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Aluminum Iron Alloy

Al-Fe Metal Alloy


Product Product Code Request Quote
Al-80% Fe-20% AL-FE-01-P.20FE Request Quote
Al-50% Fe-50% AL-FE-01-P.50FE Request Quote
Al-46% Fe-25% AL-FE-01-P.25FE Request Quote


Aluminum Iron is one of numerous metal alloys sold by American Elements under the tradename AE Alloys™. Aluminum Iron is available as bar, Ingot, ribbon, wire, shot, sheet, and foil. Ultra high purity and high purity forms also include metal powder, submicron powder and nanoscale, targets for thin film deposition, and pellets for evaporation. Aluminum Iron is generally immediately available in most volumes. American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards. Typical and custom packaging is available. Primary applications include bearing assembly, ballast, casting, step soldering, and radiation shielding.

Aluminum (Al) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolAluminum, also known as Aluminium, (atomic symbol: Al, atomic number: 13) is a Block P, Group 13, Period 3 element with an atomic weight of 26.9815386. It is the third most abundant element in the earth's crust and the most abundant metallic element.Aluminum Bohr ModelAluminum's name is derived from alumina, the mineral from which Sir Humphrey Davy attempted to refine it from in 1812. It wasn't until 1825 that Aluminum was first isolated by Hans Christian Oersted. Aluminum is a silvery gray metal that possesses many desirable characteristics. It is light, nonmagnetic and non-sparking. It stands second among metals in the scale of malleability, and sixth in ductility. It is extensively used in many industrial applications where a strong, light, easily constructed material is needed. Elemental Aluminum Although it has only 60% of the electrical conductivity of copper, it is used in electrical transmission lines because of its light weight. Pure aluminum is soft and lacks strength, but alloyed with small amounts of copper, magnesium, silicon, manganese, or other elements it imparts a variety of useful properties. Aluminum was first predicted by Antoine Lavoisierin 1787 and first isolated by Friedrich Wöhler in 1827. For more information on aluminum, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of aluminum products, visit the Aluminum element page.

Iron (Fe) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolIron (atomic symbol: Fe, atomic number: 26) is a Block D, Group 8, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 55.845. The number of electrons in each of Iron's shells is 2, 8, 14, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d6 4s2.Iron Bohr Model The iron atom has a radius of 126 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 194 pm. Iron was discovered by humans before 5000 BC. In its elemental form, iron has a lustrous grayish metallic appearance. Elemental Iron Iron is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust and the most common element by mass forming the earth as a whole. Iron is rarely found as a free element, since it tends to oxidize easily; it is usually found in minerals such as magnetite, hematite, goethite, limonite, or siderite. Though pure iron is typically soft, the addition of carbon creates the alloy known as steel, which is significantly stronger. For more information on iron, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of iron products, visit the Iron element page.



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PACKAGING SPECIFICATIONS FOR BULK & RESEARCH QUANTITIES
Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.


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Recent Research & Development for Aluminum

  • Facile and environmentally friendly solution-processed aluminum oxide dielectric for low-temperature, high-performance oxide thin-film transistors. Wangying Xu, Han Wang, Fangyan Xie, Jian Chen, Hong Tao Cao, and Jianbin Xu. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: February 13, 2015
  • Effect of the Polymer Concentration on the Rayleigh-Instability-Type Transformation in Polymer Thin Films Coated in the Nanopores of Anodic Aluminum Oxide Templates. Chia-Chan Tsai and Jiun-Tai Chen. Langmuir: February 5, 2015
  • Structural Origin of Unusual CO2 Adsorption Behavior of a Small-Pore Aluminum Bisphosphonate MOF. Philip L. Llewellyn, Miquel Garcia-Rates, Lucia Gaberová, Stuart R. Miller, Thomas Devic, Jean-Claude Lavalley, Sandrine Bourrelly, Emily Bloch, Yaroslav Filinchuk, Paul A. Wright, Christian Serre, Alexandre Vimont, and Guillaume Maurin. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 4, 2015
  • Engineered Therapeutic-Releasing Nanoporous Anodic Alumina-Aluminum Wires with Extended Release of Therapeutics. Cheryl Suwen Law, Abel Santos, Tushar Kumeria, and Dusan Losic. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 27, 2015
  • Proton and Aluminum Binding Properties of Organic Acids in Surface Waters of the Northeastern U.S.. Habibollah Fakhraei and Charles T. Driscoll. Environ. Sci. Technol.: January 27, 2015
  • Anchoring and Bending of Pentacene on Aluminum. Anu Baby, Guido Fratesi, Shital R. Vaidya, Laerte L. Patera, Cristina Africh, Luca Floreano, and Gianpaolo Brivio. J. Phys. Chem. C: January 27, 2015
  • Insertion of Benzonitrile into Al–N and Ga–N Bonds: Formation of Fused Carbatriaza-Gallanes/Alanes and Their Subsequent Synthesis from Amidines and Trimethyl-Gallium/Aluminum. K. Maheswari, A. Ramakrishna Rao, and N. Dastagiri Reddy. Inorg. Chem.: January 26, 2015
  • Mild Dehydrogenation of Ammonia Borane Complexed with Aluminum Borohydride. Iurii Dovgaliuk, Cécile S. Le Duff, Koen Robeyns, Michel Devillers, and Yaroslav Filinchuk. Chem. Mater.: January 15, 2015
  • The Formation Mechanism of 3D Porous Anodized Aluminum Oxide Templates from an Aluminum Film with Copper Impurities. Johannes Vanpaemel, Alaa M. Abd-Elnaiem, Stefan De Gendt, and Philippe M. Vereecken. J. Phys. Chem. C: January 7, 2015
  • Hydrothermal Synthesis and Characterization of Aluminum-Free Mn- Zeolite: A Catalyst for Phenol Hydroxylation. Zhen He, Juan Wu, Bingying Gao, and Hongyun He. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 3, 2015

Recent Research & Development for Iron

  • Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exert an inhibition on hepcidin expression through an estrogen-like effect associated with disordered systemic iron homeostasis. Yi Qian, Shuping Zhang, Wenli Guo, Juan Ma, Yue Chen, Lei Wang, Meirong Zhao, and Sijin Liu. Chem. Res. Toxicol.: February 16, 2015
  • pH-Responsive Iron Manganese Silicate Nanoparticles as T1-T2* Dual-Modal Imaging Probes for Tumor Diagnosis. Jian Chen, Weijie Zhang, Zhen Guo, Haibao Wang, Dongdong Wang, Jiajia Zhou, and Qianwang Chen. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: February 16, 2015
  • Hollow Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Polymer Nanobeads as MRI Contrast Agents. Nadja C Bigall, Enrico Dilena, Dirk Dorfs, Marie-Lys Beoutis, Giammarino Pugliese, Claire Wilhelm, Florence Gazeau, Abid Ali Khan, Alexander M Bittner, Miguel Angel Garcia, Mar Garcia-Hernandez, Liberato Manna, and Teresa Pellegrino. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 16, 2015
  • Stable isotopes and iron oxide mineral products as markers of chemodenitrification. L Camille Jones, Brian Peters, Juan S. Lezama Pacheco, Karen Casciotti, and Scott Fendorf. Environ. Sci. Technol.: February 16, 2015
  • Preparation of Unsupported Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst by Simple, Novel, Solvent Deficient Precipitation (SDP) Method. Kyle M. Brunner, Grant E. Harper, Kamyar Keyvanloo, Brian F. Woodfield, Calvin H. Bartholomew, and William C. Hecker. Energy Fuels: February 15, 2015
  • Manganese Doped Iron Oxide Theranostic Nanoparticles for Combined T1 Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Photothermal Therapy. Mengxin Zhang, Yuhua Cao, Lina Wang, Yufei Ma, Xiaolong Tu, and Zhijun Zhang. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: February 12, 2015
  • Iron- and Indium-Catalyzed Reactions toward Nitrogen- and Oxygen-Containing Saturated Heterocycles. Johan Cornil, Laurine Gonnard, Charlélie Bensoussan, Anna Serra-Muns, Christian Gnamm, Claude Commandeur, Malgorzata Commandeur, Sébastien Reymond, Amandine Guérinot, and Janine Cossy. Acc. Chem. Res.: February 12, 2015
  • Unraveling the structure of Iron(III)oxalate tetrahydrate and its reversible Li insertion capability. Hania Ahouari, Gwenaelle Rousse, Juan Jose Rodriguez-Carvajal, Moulay Tahar Sougrati, Matthieu Saubanère, Matthieu Courty, Nadir Recham, and Jean-Marie Tarascon. Chem. Mater.: February 12, 2015
  • Role of Surface Chemistry and Morphology in Reactive Adsorption Of H2S on Iron (Hydr)oxides/Graphite Oxide Composites. Javier A. Arcibar-Orozco, Rajiv Wallace, Joshua K. Mitchell, and Teresa J Bandosz. Langmuir: February 12, 2015
  • Surface and Interfacial Engineering of Iron Oxide Nanoplates for Highly Efficient Magnetic Resonance Angiography. Zijian Zhou, Changqiang Wu, Hanyu Liu, Xianglong Zhu, Zhenghuan Zhao, Lirong Wang, Ye Xu, Hua Ai, and Jinhao Gao. ACS Nano: February 11, 2015