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Copper Iron Alloy

Cu-Fe Alloy


Product Product Code Request Quote
Cu-96% Fe-4% CU-FE-01-P.04FE Request Quote
Cu-70% Fe-30% CU-FE-01-P.30FE Request Quote

Copper Iron is one of numerous metal alloys sold by American Elements under the tradename AE Alloys™. Generally immediately available in most volumes, AE Alloys™ are available as bar, ingot, ribbon, wire, shot, sheet, and foil. Ultra high purity and high purity forms also include metal powder, submicron powder and nanoscale, targets for thin film deposition, and pellets for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) applications. American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards. Typical and custom packaging is available. Primary applications include bearing assembly, ballast, casting, step soldering, and radiation shielding.

Copper Bohr ModelCopper (Cu) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolCopper (atomic symbol: Cu, atomic number: 29) is a Block D, Group 11, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 63.546. The number of electrons in each of copper's shells is 2, 8, 18, 1 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d10 4s1. The copper atom has a radius of 128 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 186 pm. Copper was first discovered by Early Man prior to 9000 BC. In its elemental form, copper has a red-orange metallic luster appearance. Elemental Copper Of all pure metals, only silver has a higher electrical conductivity.The origin of the word copper comes from the Latin word 'cuprium' which translates as "metal of Cyprus." Cyprus, a Mediterranean island, was known as an ancient source of mined copper. For more information on copper, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of copper products, visit the Copper element page.

Iron (Fe) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolIron (atomic symbol: Fe, atomic number: 26) is a Block D, Group 8, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 55.845. The number of electrons in each of Iron's shells is 2, 8, 14, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d6 4s2.Iron Bohr Model The iron atom has a radius of 126 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 194 pm. Iron was discovered by humans before 5000 BC. In its elemental form, iron has a lustrous grayish metallic appearance. Elemental Iron Iron is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust and the most common element by mass forming the earth as a whole. Iron is rarely found as a free element, since it tends to oxidize easily; it is usually found in minerals such as magnetite, hematite, goethite, limonite, or siderite. Though pure iron is typically soft, the addition of carbon creates the alloy known as steel, which is significantly stronger. For more information on iron, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of iron products, visit the Iron element page.


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PACKAGING SPECIFICATIONS FOR BULK & RESEARCH QUANTITIES
Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.


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Recent Research & Development for Copper

  • The Environmental Legacy of Copper Metallurgy and Mongol Silver Smelting Recorded in Yunnan Lake Sediments. Aubrey L. Hillman, Mark B. Abbott, JunQing Yu, Daniel J. Bain, and TzeHuey Chiou-Peng. Environ. Sci. Technol.: February 16, 2015
  • Highly dispersed copper oxide clusters as active species in copper-ceria catalyst for preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide. Wei-Wei Wang, Pei-Pei Du, Shi-Hui Zou, Huan-Yu He, Rui-Xing Wang, Zhao Jin, Shuo Shi, Yuying Huang, Rui Si, Qi-Sheng Song, Chun-Jiang Jia, and Chun-Hua Yan. ACS Catal.: February 13, 2015
  • NO Decomposition Activated by Preadsorption of O2 onto Copper Cluster Anions. Shinichi Hirabayashi and Masahiko Ichihashi. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 12, 2015
  • Synthesis of Vinyl Trifluoromethyl Thioethers via Copper-Mediated Trifluoromethylthiolation of Vinyl Bromides. Yangjie Huang, Jianping Ding, Chuyi Wu, Huidong Zheng, and Zhiqiang Weng. J. Org. Chem.: 42047
  • Renal Clearance and Degradation of Glutathione-coated Copper Nanoparticles. Jie Zheng, Shengyang Yang, Shasha Sun, Chen Zhou, Guiyang Hao, Jinbin Liu, Saleh Ramezani, Mengxiao Yu, and Xiankai Sun. Bioconjugate Chem.: February 12, 2015
  • Copper-Catalyzed N-Cyanation of Sulfoximines by AIBN. Fan Teng, Jin-Tao Yu, Zhou Zhou, Haoke Chu, and Jiang Cheng. J. Org. Chem.: 42045
  • Aggregation, dissolution and transformation of copper nanoparticles in natural waters. Jon Robert Conway, Adeyemi S. Adeleye, Jorge L Gardea-Torresdey, and Arturo A. Keller. Environ. Sci. Technol.: February 9, 2015
  • Lewis Acid-Induced Change from Four- to Two-Electron Reduction of Dioxygen Catalyzed by Copper Complexes Using Scandium Triflate. Saya Kakuda, Clarence Rolle, Kei Ohkubo, Maxime A. Siegler, Kenneth D. Karlin, and Shunichi Fukuzumi. J. Am. Chem. Soc.: February 7, 2015
  • Tris(2,2'-azobispyridine) Complexes of Copper(II): X-ray Structures, Reactivities, and the Radical Nonradical Bis(ligand) Analogues. Suvendu Maity, Suman Kundu, Thomas Weyhermüller, and Prasanta Ghosh. Inorg. Chem.: February 4, 2015
  • Proton Conduction and Long-Range Ferrimagnetic Ordering in Two Isostructural Copper(II) Mesoxalate Metal–Organic Frameworks. Beatriz Gil-Hernández, Stanislav Savvin, Gamall Makhloufi, Pedro Núñez, Christoph Janiak, and Joaquín Sanchiz. Inorg. Chem.: February 4, 2015

Recent Research & Development for Iron

  • Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exert an inhibition on hepcidin expression through an estrogen-like effect associated with disordered systemic iron homeostasis. Yi Qian, Shuping Zhang, Wenli Guo, Juan Ma, Yue Chen, Lei Wang, Meirong Zhao, and Sijin Liu. Chem. Res. Toxicol.: February 16, 2015
  • pH-Responsive Iron Manganese Silicate Nanoparticles as T1-T2* Dual-Modal Imaging Probes for Tumor Diagnosis. Jian Chen, Weijie Zhang, Zhen Guo, Haibao Wang, Dongdong Wang, Jiajia Zhou, and Qianwang Chen. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: February 16, 2015
  • Hollow Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Polymer Nanobeads as MRI Contrast Agents. Nadja C Bigall, Enrico Dilena, Dirk Dorfs, Marie-Lys Beoutis, Giammarino Pugliese, Claire Wilhelm, Florence Gazeau, Abid Ali Khan, Alexander M Bittner, Miguel Angel Garcia, Mar Garcia-Hernandez, Liberato Manna, and Teresa Pellegrino. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 16, 2015
  • Stable isotopes and iron oxide mineral products as markers of chemodenitrification. L Camille Jones, Brian Peters, Juan S. Lezama Pacheco, Karen Casciotti, and Scott Fendorf. Environ. Sci. Technol.: February 16, 2015
  • Preparation of Unsupported Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst by Simple, Novel, Solvent Deficient Precipitation (SDP) Method. Kyle M. Brunner, Grant E. Harper, Kamyar Keyvanloo, Brian F. Woodfield, Calvin H. Bartholomew, and William C. Hecker. Energy Fuels: February 15, 2015
  • Manganese Doped Iron Oxide Theranostic Nanoparticles for Combined T1 Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Photothermal Therapy. Mengxin Zhang, Yuhua Cao, Lina Wang, Yufei Ma, Xiaolong Tu, and Zhijun Zhang. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: February 12, 2015
  • Iron- and Indium-Catalyzed Reactions toward Nitrogen- and Oxygen-Containing Saturated Heterocycles. Johan Cornil, Laurine Gonnard, Charlélie Bensoussan, Anna Serra-Muns, Christian Gnamm, Claude Commandeur, Malgorzata Commandeur, Sébastien Reymond, Amandine Guérinot, and Janine Cossy. Acc. Chem. Res.: February 12, 2015
  • Unraveling the structure of Iron(III)oxalate tetrahydrate and its reversible Li insertion capability. Hania Ahouari, Gwenaelle Rousse, Juan Jose Rodriguez-Carvajal, Moulay Tahar Sougrati, Matthieu Saubanère, Matthieu Courty, Nadir Recham, and Jean-Marie Tarascon. Chem. Mater.: February 12, 2015
  • Role of Surface Chemistry and Morphology in Reactive Adsorption Of H2S on Iron (Hydr)oxides/Graphite Oxide Composites. Javier A. Arcibar-Orozco, Rajiv Wallace, Joshua K. Mitchell, and Teresa J Bandosz. Langmuir: February 12, 2015
  • Surface and Interfacial Engineering of Iron Oxide Nanoplates for Highly Efficient Magnetic Resonance Angiography. Zijian Zhou, Changqiang Wu, Hanyu Liu, Xianglong Zhu, Zhenghuan Zhao, Lirong Wang, Ye Xu, Hua Ai, and Jinhao Gao. ACS Nano: February 11, 2015