Iron Nickel Copper Nanoparticles

Fe-Ni-Cu Nanoparticles/Nanopowder


Product Product Code Order or Specifications
(2N) 99% Iron Nickel Copper Nanoparticles FE-NICU-02-NP Contact American Elements
(3N) 99.9% Iron Nickel Copper Nanoparticles FE-NICU-03-NP Contact American Elements
(4N) 99.99% Iron Nickel Copper Nanoparticles FE-NICU-04-NP Contact American Elements
(5N) 99.999% Iron Nickel Copper Nanoparticles FE-NICU-05-NP Contact American Elements

High Purity, D50 = +10 nanometer (nm) by SEMIron Nickel Copper (FeNiCu) Nanoparticles, nanodots or nanopowder are spherical or faceted high surface area metal particles. Nanoscale Tin Particles are typically 10-20 nanometers (nm) with specific surface area (SSA) in the 30 - 60 m 2 /g range and also available in with an average particle size of 80 nm range with a specific surface area of approximately 12 m 2 /g. Nano Tin Particles are also available in Ultra high purity and high purity and coated and dispersed forms. They are also available as a nanofluid through the AE Nanofluid production group. Nanofluids are generally defined as suspended nanoparticles in solution either using surfactant or surface charge technology. Nanofluid dispersion and coating selection technical guidance is also available. Other nanostructures include nanorods, nanowhiskers, nanohorns, nanopyramids and other nanocomposites. Surface functionalized nanoparticles allow for the particles to be preferentially adsorbed at the surface interface using chemically bound polymers.

Development research is underway in Nano Electronics and Photonics materials, such as MEMS and NEMS, Bio Nano Materials, such as Biomarkers, Bio Diagnostics & Bio Sensors, and Related Nano Materials, for use in Polymers, Textiles, Fuel Cell Layers, Composites and Solar Energy materials. Nanopowders are analyzed for chemical composition by ICP, particle size distribution (PSD) by laser diffraction, and for Specific Surface Area (SSA) by BET multi-point correlation techniques. Novel nanotechnology applications also include Quantum Dots. High surface areas can also be achieved using solutions and using thin film by sputtering targets and evaporation technology using pellets, rod and foil.. Applications for Tin nanocrystals include in transparent ant-static film, as an anti-microbial, anti-biotic and anti-fungal agent when doped with silver and incorporated in coatings, plastics, nanofiber, bandages and textiles. Further research is being done for their potential as confined acoustic and optic phonons and for their electrical, biomedical and bioscience properties.Nanoparticles are generally immediately available in most volumes. Additional technical, research and safety (MSDS) information is available.

Iron (Fe) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolIron (atomic symbol: Fe, atomic number: 26) is a Block D, Group 8, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 55.845. The number of electrons in each of Iron's shells is 2, 8, 14, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d6 4s2.Iron Bohr Model The iron atom has a radius of 126 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 194 pm. Iron was discovered by humans before 5000 BC. In its elemental form, iron has a lustrous grayish metallic appearance. Elemental Iron Iron is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust and the most common element by mass forming the earth as a whole. Iron is rarely found as a free element, since it tends to oxidize easily; it is usually found in minerals such as magnetite , hematite, goethite, limonite, or siderite. Though pure iron is typically soft, the addition of carbon creates the alloy known as steel, which is significantly stronger. For more information on iron, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of iron products, visit the Iron Information Center.

Nickel (Ni) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolNickel (atomic symbol: Ni, atomic number: 28) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 58.6934. Nickel Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of nickel's shells is [2, 8, 16, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar]3d8 4s2. Nickel was first discovered by Alex Constedt in 1751. The nickel atom has a radius of 124 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 184 pm. In its elemental form, nickel has a lustrous metallic silver appearance. Elemental Nickel Nickel is a hard and ductile transition metal that is considered corrosion-resistant because of its slow rate of oxidation. It is one of four elements that are ferromagnetic and is used in the production of various type of magnets for commercial use. Nickel is sometimes found free in nature but is more commonly found in ores. The bulk of mined nickel comes from laterite and magmatic sulfide ores. The name originates from the German word "kupfernickel," which means "false copper" from the illusory copper color of the ore. For more information on nickel, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of nickel products, visit the Nickel Information Center.

Copper Bohr ModelCopper (Cu) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolCopper (atomic symbol: Cu, atomic number: 29) is a Block D, Group 11, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 63.546. The number of electrons in each of copper's shells is 2, 8, 18, 1 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d10 4s1. The copper atom has a radius of 128 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 186 pm. Copper was first discovered by Early Man prior to 9000 BC.In its elemental form, copper has a red-orange metallic luster appearance. Elemental Copper Of all pure metals, only silver has a higher electrical conductivity.The origin of the word copper comes from the Latin word 'cuprium' which translates as "metal of Cyprus." Cyprus, a Mediterranean island, was known as an ancient source of mined copper. For more information on copper, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of copper products, visit the Copper Information Center.


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PACKAGING SPECIFICATIONS FOR BULK & RESEARCH QUANTITIES
Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.


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Recent Research & Development for Iron

  • Zhi-kai Chen, Shu-chao Lu, Xi-bin Song, Haifeng Zhang, Wan-shi Yang, Hong Zhou, Effects of bionic units on the fatigue wear of gray cast iron surface with different shapes and distributions, Optics & Laser Technology, Volume 66, March 2015
  • Z. Karoly, J. Szepvolgyi, W. Kaszuwara, O. Łabędź, M. Bystrzejewski, Influence of ferrite stabilizing elements and Co on structure and magnetic properties of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles synthesized in thermal plasma jet, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 619, 15 January 2015
  • Fei Liu, Yehua Jiang, Han Xiao, Jun Tan, Study on fragmentation and dissolution behavior of carbide in a hot-rolled hypereutectic high chromium cast iron, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 618, 5 January 2015
  • J. O’Flynn, S.F. Corbin, The influence of iron powder size on pore formation, densification and homogenization during blended elemental sintering of Ti–2.5Fe, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 618, 5 January 2015
  • V.S. Rudnev, M.V. Adigamova, I.V. Lukiyanchuk, I.A. Tkachenko, V.P. Morozova, Structure and magnetic characteristics of iron-modified titania layers on titanium, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 618, 5 January 2015
  • L. Yang, F. Gao, R.J. Kurtz, X.T. Zu, Atomistic simulations of helium clustering and grain boundary reconstruction in alpha-iron, Acta Materialia, Volume 82, 1 January 2015
  • Jin Gi Hong, Yongsheng Chen, Evaluation of electrochemical properties and reverse electrodialysis performance for porous cation exchange membranes with sulfate-functionalized iron oxide, Journal of Membrane Science, Volume 473, 1 January 2015
  • Q.C. Fan, X.Q. Jiang, Z.H. Zhou, W. Ji, H.Q. Cao, Constitutive relationship and hot deformation behavior of Armco-type pure iron for a wide range of temperature, Materials & Design, Volume 65, January 2015
  • Uğur Çavdar, Bekir Sadık Ünlü, Ahmet Murat Pinar, Enver Atik, Mechanical properties of heat treated iron based compacts, Materials & Design, Volume 65, January 2015
  • Adrian H.A. Lutey, Alessandro Fortunato, Alessandro Ascari, Simone Carmignato, Claudio Leone, Laser cutting of lithium iron phosphate battery electrodes: Characterization of process efficiency and quality, Optics & Laser Technology, Volume 65, January 2015

Recent Research & Development for Nickel

  • Peng-Fei Yin, Chao Zhou, Xiang-Yu Han, Zheng-Ren Zhang, Chuan-Hui Xia, Li-Li Sun, Shape and phase evolution of nickel sulfide nano/microcrystallines via a facile way, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 620, 25 January 2015
  • F.F. Han, J.X. Chang, H. Li, L.H. Lou, J. Zhang, Influence of Ta content on hot corrosion behaviour of a directionally solidified nickel base superalloy, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 619, 15 January 2015
  • Zhen Li, Jiesheng Han, Jinjun Lu, Jianmin Chen, Cavitation erosion behavior of Hastelloy C-276 nickel-based alloy, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 619, 15 January 2015
  • Rosa Carballo, Berta Covelo, Ana B. Lago, Arantxa Pino-Cuevas, Ezequiel M. Vázquez-López, Exploration of the solid state metallosupramolecular chemistry of mononuclear nickel(II) complexes with α-hydroxycarboxylates and 2,2′-dipyridylamine, Polyhedron, Volume 85, 8 January 2015
  • Sohail Saeed, Khuram Shahzad Ahmed, Naghmana Rashid, Mohammad Azad Malik, Paul O’Brien, Masood Akhtar, Rizwan Hussain, Wing-Tak Wong, Symmetrical and unsymmetrical nickel(II) complexes of N-(dialkylcarbamothioyl)-nitro substituted benzamide as single-source precursors for deposition of nickel sulfide nanostructured thin films by AACVD, Polyhedron, Volume 85, 8 January 2015
  • Xu-Feng Liu, Xie Li, Jing Yan, Synthetic and structural studies of the mononuclear nickel(II) ethanedithiolate complexes with chelating N-substituted bis(diphenylphosphanyl)amine, Polyhedron, Volume 85, 8 January 2015
  • Ali Hossein Kianfar, Mroteza Dostani, Wan Ahmad Kamil Mahmood, An unprecedented DDQ–nickel(II)Salen complex interaction and X-ray crystal structure of nickel(II)Salen.DDH co-crystal, Polyhedron, Volume 85, 8 January 2015
  • Kihun Jang, Seongil Yu, Sung-Hyeon Park, Hak-Sung Kim, Heejoon Ahn, Intense pulsed light-assisted facile and agile fabrication of cobalt oxide/nickel cobaltite nanoflakes on nickel-foam for high performance supercapacitor applications, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 618, 5 January 2015
  • Qiaoqiao Yin, Ru Qiao, Zhengquan Li, Xiao Li Zhang, Lanlan Zhu, Hierarchical nanostructures of nickel-doped zinc oxide: Morphology controlled synthesis and enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 618, 5 January 2015
  • Fei Sun, Jianxin Zhang, Shengcheng Mao, Ying Jiang, Qiang Feng, Zhenju Shen, Jixue Li, Ze Zhang, Xiaodong Han, Kink structures induced in nickel-based single crystal superalloys by high-Z element migration, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 618, 5 January 2015

Recent Research & Development for Copper

  • Wen-Tong Chen, Qiu-Yan Luo, Ya-Ping Xu, Yan-Kang Dai, Shan-Lin Huang, Pei-Yu Guo, Hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structure and properties of a thermally stable dysprosium porphyrin with a three-dimensional porous open framework, Inorganic Chemistry Communications, Volume 49, November 2014
  • Yingjie Zhang, Mohan Bhadbhade, Nicholas Scales, Inna Karatchevtseva, Jason R. Price, Kim Lu, Gregory R. Lumpkin, Dysprosium complexes with mono-/di-carboxylate ligands—From simple dimers to 2D and 3D frameworks, Journal of Solid State Chemistry, Volume 219, November 2014
  • Yan Sui, Xiao-Niu Fang, Rong-Hua Hu, Jia Li, Dong-Sheng Liu, A new type of multifunctional single ionic dysprosium complex based on chiral salen-type Schiff base ligand, Inorganica Chimica Acta, Volume 423, Part A, 1 November 2014
  • Yan Wang, Bin Cui, Lulu Zhang, Zhenyu Hu, Yaoyu Wang, Phase composition, microstructure, and dielectric properties of dysprosium-doped Ba(Zr0.1Ti0.9)O3-based Y5V ceramics with high permittivity, Ceramics International, Volume 40, Issue 8, Part A, September 2014
  • M.F. Al-Kuhaili, S.M.A. Durrani, Structural and optical properties of dysprosium oxide thin films, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 591, 5 April 2014
  • Huijie Zhang, Ruiqing Fan, Wei Chen, Xubin Zheng, Kai Li, Ping Wang, Yulin Yang, Two new dysprosium–organic frameworks contaning rigid dicarboxylate ligands: Synthesis and effect of solvents on the luminescent properties, Journal of Luminescence, Volume 143, November 2013
  • Stuart K. Langley, Boujemaa Moubaraki, Keith S. Murray, Trinuclear, octanuclear and decanuclear dysprosium(III) complexes: Synthesis, structural and magnetic studies, Polyhedron, Volume 64, 12 November 2013
  • Mengsi Yang, Jianhua Jin, Guiqing Xu, Fengling Cui, Hongxia Luo, A naproxen complex of dysprosium intercalates into calf thymus DNA base pairs, Chemical Physics, Volume 428, 15 January 2014
  • Zhi-Gang Wang, Jing Lu, Chun-Yan Gao, Chao Wang, Jin-Lei Tian, Wen Gu, Xin Liu, Shi-Ping Yan, Single-ion magnet behavior of a new mononuclear dysprosium complex, Inorganic Chemistry Communications, Volume 27, January 2013
  • Brian J. Jaques, Daniel D. Osterberg, Gordon A. Alanko, Sumit Tamrakar, Cole R. Smith, Michael F. Hurley, Darryl P. Butt, In situ characterization of the nitridation of dysprosium during mechanochemical processing, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 619, 15 January 201