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Iron Nickel Copper Nanoparticles

Fe-Ni-Cu Nanoparticles/Nanopowder


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(2N) 99% Iron Nickel Copper Nanoparticles FE-NICU-02-NP Request Quote
(3N) 99.9% Iron Nickel Copper Nanoparticles FE-NICU-03-NP Request Quote
(4N) 99.99% Iron Nickel Copper Nanoparticles FE-NICU-04-NP Request Quote
(5N) 99.999% Iron Nickel Copper Nanoparticles FE-NICU-05-NP Request Quote

High Purity, D50 = +10 nanometer (nm) by SEMIron Nickel Copper (FeNiCu) Nanoparticles, nanodots or nanopowder are spherical or faceted high surface area metal particles. Nanoscale Tin Particles are typically 10-20 nanometers (nm) with specific surface area (SSA) in the 30 - 60 m 2 /g range and also available in with an average particle size of 80 nm range with a specific surface area of approximately 12 m 2 /g. Nano Tin Particles are also available in Ultra high purity and high purity and coated and dispersed forms. They are also available as a nanofluid through the AE Nanofluid production group. Nanofluids are generally defined as suspended nanoparticles in solution either using surfactant or surface charge technology. Nanofluid dispersion and coating selection technical guidance is also available. Other nanostructures include nanorods, nanowhiskers, nanohorns, nanopyramids and other nanocomposites. Surface functionalized nanoparticles allow for the particles to be preferentially adsorbed at the surface interface using chemically bound polymers.

Development research is underway in Nano Electronics and Photonics materials, such as MEMS and NEMS, Bio Nano Materials, such as Biomarkers, Bio Diagnostics & Bio Sensors, and Related Nano Materials, for use in Polymers, Textiles, Fuel Cell Layers, Composites and Solar Energy materials. Nanopowders are analyzed for chemical composition by ICP, particle size distribution (PSD) by laser diffraction, and for Specific Surface Area (SSA) by BET multi-point correlation techniques. Novel nanotechnology applications also include Quantum Dots. High surface areas can also be achieved using solutions and using thin film by sputtering targets and evaporation technology using pellets, rod and foil.. Applications for Tin nanocrystals include in transparent ant-static film, as an anti-microbial, anti-biotic and anti-fungal agent when doped with silver and incorporated in coatings, plastics, nanofiber, bandages and textiles. Further research is being done for their potential as confined acoustic and optic phonons and for their electrical, biomedical and bioscience properties.Nanoparticles are generally immediately available in most volumes. Additional technical, research and safety (MSDS) information is available.

Iron (Fe) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolIron (atomic symbol: Fe, atomic number: 26) is a Block D, Group 8, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 55.845. The number of electrons in each of Iron's shells is 2, 8, 14, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d6 4s2.Iron Bohr Model The iron atom has a radius of 126 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 194 pm. Iron was discovered by humans before 5000 BC. In its elemental form, iron has a lustrous grayish metallic appearance. Elemental Iron Iron is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust and the most common element by mass forming the earth as a whole. Iron is rarely found as a free element, since it tends to oxidize easily; it is usually found in minerals such as magnetite, hematite, goethite, limonite, or siderite. Though pure iron is typically soft, the addition of carbon creates the alloy known as steel, which is significantly stronger. For more information on iron, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of iron products, visit the Iron element page.

Nickel (Ni) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolNickel (atomic symbol: Ni, atomic number: 28) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 58.6934. Nickel Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of nickel's shells is [2, 8, 16, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar]3d8 4s2. Nickel was first discovered by Alex Constedt in 1751. The nickel atom has a radius of 124 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 184 pm. In its elemental form, nickel has a lustrous metallic silver appearance. Elemental Nickel Nickel is a hard and ductile transition metal that is considered corrosion-resistant because of its slow rate of oxidation. It is one of four elements that are ferromagnetic and is used in the production of various type of magnets for commercial use. Nickel is sometimes found free in nature but is more commonly found in ores. The bulk of mined nickel comes from laterite and magmatic sulfide ores. The name originates from the German word kupfernickel, which means "false copper" from the illusory copper color of the ore. For more information on nickel, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of nickel products, visit the Nickel element page.

Copper Bohr ModelCopper (Cu) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolCopper (atomic symbol: Cu, atomic number: 29) is a Block D, Group 11, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 63.546. The number of electrons in each of copper's shells is 2, 8, 18, 1 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d10 4s1. The copper atom has a radius of 128 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 186 pm. Copper was first discovered by Early Man prior to 9000 BC. In its elemental form, copper has a red-orange metallic luster appearance. Elemental Copper Of all pure metals, only silver has a higher electrical conductivity.The origin of the word copper comes from the Latin word 'cuprium' which translates as "metal of Cyprus." Cyprus, a Mediterranean island, was known as an ancient source of mined copper. For more information on copper, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of copper products, visit the Copper element page.


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PACKAGING SPECIFICATIONS FOR BULK & RESEARCH QUANTITIES
Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.


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Recent Research & Development for Iron

  • Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exert an inhibition on hepcidin expression through an estrogen-like effect associated with disordered systemic iron homeostasis. Yi Qian, Shuping Zhang, Wenli Guo, Juan Ma, Yue Chen, Lei Wang, Meirong Zhao, and Sijin Liu. Chem. Res. Toxicol.: February 16, 2015
  • pH-Responsive Iron Manganese Silicate Nanoparticles as T1-T2* Dual-Modal Imaging Probes for Tumor Diagnosis. Jian Chen, Weijie Zhang, Zhen Guo, Haibao Wang, Dongdong Wang, Jiajia Zhou, and Qianwang Chen. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: February 16, 2015
  • Hollow Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Polymer Nanobeads as MRI Contrast Agents. Nadja C Bigall, Enrico Dilena, Dirk Dorfs, Marie-Lys Beoutis, Giammarino Pugliese, Claire Wilhelm, Florence Gazeau, Abid Ali Khan, Alexander M Bittner, Miguel Angel Garcia, Mar Garcia-Hernandez, Liberato Manna, and Teresa Pellegrino. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 16, 2015
  • Stable isotopes and iron oxide mineral products as markers of chemodenitrification. L Camille Jones, Brian Peters, Juan S. Lezama Pacheco, Karen Casciotti, and Scott Fendorf. Environ. Sci. Technol.: February 16, 2015
  • Preparation of Unsupported Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst by Simple, Novel, Solvent Deficient Precipitation (SDP) Method. Kyle M. Brunner, Grant E. Harper, Kamyar Keyvanloo, Brian F. Woodfield, Calvin H. Bartholomew, and William C. Hecker. Energy Fuels: February 15, 2015
  • Manganese Doped Iron Oxide Theranostic Nanoparticles for Combined T1 Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Photothermal Therapy. Mengxin Zhang, Yuhua Cao, Lina Wang, Yufei Ma, Xiaolong Tu, and Zhijun Zhang. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: February 12, 2015
  • Iron- and Indium-Catalyzed Reactions toward Nitrogen- and Oxygen-Containing Saturated Heterocycles. Johan Cornil, Laurine Gonnard, Charlélie Bensoussan, Anna Serra-Muns, Christian Gnamm, Claude Commandeur, Malgorzata Commandeur, Sébastien Reymond, Amandine Guérinot, and Janine Cossy. Acc. Chem. Res.: February 12, 2015
  • Unraveling the structure of Iron(III)oxalate tetrahydrate and its reversible Li insertion capability. Hania Ahouari, Gwenaelle Rousse, Juan Jose Rodriguez-Carvajal, Moulay Tahar Sougrati, Matthieu Saubanère, Matthieu Courty, Nadir Recham, and Jean-Marie Tarascon. Chem. Mater.: February 12, 2015
  • Role of Surface Chemistry and Morphology in Reactive Adsorption Of H2S on Iron (Hydr)oxides/Graphite Oxide Composites. Javier A. Arcibar-Orozco, Rajiv Wallace, Joshua K. Mitchell, and Teresa J Bandosz. Langmuir: February 12, 2015
  • Surface and Interfacial Engineering of Iron Oxide Nanoplates for Highly Efficient Magnetic Resonance Angiography. Zijian Zhou, Changqiang Wu, Hanyu Liu, Xianglong Zhu, Zhenghuan Zhao, Lirong Wang, Ye Xu, Hua Ai, and Jinhao Gao. ACS Nano: February 11, 2015

Recent Research & Development for Nickel

  • Association Model for Nickel and Vanadium with Asphaltene during Solvent Deasphalting. Chuanbo Yu, Linzhou Zhang, Xiuying Guo, Zhiming Xu, Xuewen Sun, Chunming Xu, and Suoqi Zhao. Energy Fuels: February 12, 2015
  • Coke Minimization during Conversion of Biogas to Syngas by Bimetallic Tungsten-Nickel Incorporated Mesoporous Alumina Synthesized by the One-Pot Route. Huseyin Arbag, Sena Yasyerli, Nail Yasyerli, Gulsen Dogu, Timur Dogu, Ilja Gasan Osojnik Crnivec, and Albin Pintar. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.: February 12, 2015
  • Cleavage of lignin-derived 4-O-5 aryl ethers over nickel nanoparticles supported on niobic acid-activated carbon composites. Shaohua Jin, Zihui Xiao, Xiao Chen, Lei Wang, Jin Guo, Miao Zhang, and Changhai Liang. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.: February 10, 2015
  • Visible Light Mediated Cyclization of Tertiary Anilines with Maleimides Using Nickel(II) Oxide Surface-Modified Titanium Dioxide Catalyst. Jian Tang, Günter Grampp, Yun Liu, Bing-Xiang Wang, Fei-Fei Tao, Li-Jun Wang, Xue-Zheng Liang, Hui-Quan Xiao, and Yong-Miao Shen. J. Org. Chem.: February 2, 2015
  • Enhancement of Nitrite and Nitrate Electrocatalytic Reduction through the Employment of Self-Assembled Layers of Nickel- and Copper-Substituted Crown-Type Heteropolyanions. Shahzad Imar, Chiara Maccato, Calum Dickinson, et. al. Langmuir: February 2, 2015
  • Selective N-Methylation of Aliphatic Amines with CO2 and Hydrosilanes Using Nickel-Phosphine Catalysts. Lucero González-Sebastián, Marcos Flores-Alamo, and Juventino J. García. Organometallics: January 30, 2015
  • Structural and Chemical Evolution of Amorphous Nickel Iron Complex Hydroxide upon Lithiation/Delithiation. Kai-Yang Niu, Feng Lin, Liang Fang, Dennis Nordlund, Runzhe Tao, Tsu-Chien Weng, Marca Doeff, and Haimei Zheng. Chem. Mater.: January 27, 2015
  • Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Ethylene Reaction on Nickel (111) Surface. Rizal Arifin, Yasushi Shibuta, Kohei Shimamura, Fuyuki Shimojo, and Shu Yamaguchi. J. Phys. Chem. C: January 23, 2015
  • Synthesis, Structure, and Solution Dynamic Behavior of Nickel Complexes Bearing a 1,3-Diallyl-Substituted NHC Ligand. Agata Wodarska, Andrzej Kozio, Maciej Dranka, Adam Gryff-Keller, Przemysaw Szczeciski, Jakub Jurkowski, and Antoni Pietrzykowski. Organometallics: January 22, 2015
  • Synthesis and Characterization of Ferrocene-Chelating Heteroscorpionate Complexes of Nickel(II) and Zinc(II). Mark Abubekerov and Paula L. Diaconescu. Inorg. Chem.: January 21, 2015

Recent Research & Development for Copper

  • The Environmental Legacy of Copper Metallurgy and Mongol Silver Smelting Recorded in Yunnan Lake Sediments. Aubrey L. Hillman, Mark B. Abbott, JunQing Yu, Daniel J. Bain, and TzeHuey Chiou-Peng. Environ. Sci. Technol.: February 16, 2015
  • Highly dispersed copper oxide clusters as active species in copper-ceria catalyst for preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide. Wei-Wei Wang, Pei-Pei Du, Shi-Hui Zou, Huan-Yu He, Rui-Xing Wang, Zhao Jin, Shuo Shi, Yuying Huang, Rui Si, Qi-Sheng Song, Chun-Jiang Jia, and Chun-Hua Yan. ACS Catal.: February 13, 2015
  • NO Decomposition Activated by Preadsorption of O2 onto Copper Cluster Anions. Shinichi Hirabayashi and Masahiko Ichihashi. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 12, 2015
  • Synthesis of Vinyl Trifluoromethyl Thioethers via Copper-Mediated Trifluoromethylthiolation of Vinyl Bromides. Yangjie Huang, Jianping Ding, Chuyi Wu, Huidong Zheng, and Zhiqiang Weng. J. Org. Chem.: 42047
  • Renal Clearance and Degradation of Glutathione-coated Copper Nanoparticles. Jie Zheng, Shengyang Yang, Shasha Sun, Chen Zhou, Guiyang Hao, Jinbin Liu, Saleh Ramezani, Mengxiao Yu, and Xiankai Sun. Bioconjugate Chem.: February 12, 2015
  • Copper-Catalyzed N-Cyanation of Sulfoximines by AIBN. Fan Teng, Jin-Tao Yu, Zhou Zhou, Haoke Chu, and Jiang Cheng. J. Org. Chem.: 42045
  • Aggregation, dissolution and transformation of copper nanoparticles in natural waters. Jon Robert Conway, Adeyemi S. Adeleye, Jorge L Gardea-Torresdey, and Arturo A. Keller. Environ. Sci. Technol.: February 9, 2015
  • Lewis Acid-Induced Change from Four- to Two-Electron Reduction of Dioxygen Catalyzed by Copper Complexes Using Scandium Triflate. Saya Kakuda, Clarence Rolle, Kei Ohkubo, Maxime A. Siegler, Kenneth D. Karlin, and Shunichi Fukuzumi. J. Am. Chem. Soc.: February 7, 2015
  • Tris(2,2'-azobispyridine) Complexes of Copper(II): X-ray Structures, Reactivities, and the Radical Nonradical Bis(ligand) Analogues. Suvendu Maity, Suman Kundu, Thomas Weyhermüller, and Prasanta Ghosh. Inorg. Chem.: February 4, 2015
  • Proton Conduction and Long-Range Ferrimagnetic Ordering in Two Isostructural Copper(II) Mesoxalate Metal–Organic Frameworks. Beatriz Gil-Hernández, Stanislav Savvin, Gamall Makhloufi, Pedro Núñez, Christoph Janiak, and Joaquín Sanchiz. Inorg. Chem.: February 4, 2015