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Nickel Sulfide

NiS
CAS 16812-54-7


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(5N) 99.999% Nickel Sulfide Powder NI-S-05-P Request Quote
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(5N) 99.999% Nickel Sulfide Chunk NI-S-05-CK Request Quote
(5N) 99.999% Nickel Sulfide Lump NI-S-05-L Request Quote
(5N) 99.999% Nickel Sulfide Sputtering Target NI-S-05-ST Request Quote
(5N) 99.999% Nickel Sulfide Wafer NI-S-05-WSX Request Quote

CHEMICAL
IDENTIFIER
Formula CAS No. PubChem SID PubChem CID MDL No. EC No IUPAC Name Beilstein
Re. No.
SMILES
Identifier
InChI
Identifier
InChI
Key
NiS 16812-54-7 34670564 28094 N/A 240-841-2 sulfanylidenenickel N/A [Ni+2].[S-2] InChI=1S/Ni.S/q+2;-2 ADGNAMGSVYAHHD-UHFFFAOYSA-N

PROPERTIES Compound Formula Mol. Wt. Appearance Melting Point Boiling Point Density Exact Mass Monoisotopic Mass Charge MSDS
NiS 90.7584 Crystalline solid 797 °C
(1467 °F)
N/A 5.8 g/cm3 89.907419 89.907417 Da 0 Safety Data Sheet

Sulfide IonNickel Sulfide is a moderately water and acid soluble Nickel source for uses compatible with sulfates. Sulfate compounds are salts or esters of sulfuric acid formed by replacing one or both of the hydrogens with a metal. Most metal sulfate compounds are readily soluble in water for uses such as water treatment, unlike fluorides and oxides which tend to be insoluble. Organometallic forms are soluble in organic solutions and sometimes in both aqueous and organic solutions. Metallic ions can also be dispersed utilizing suspended or coated nanoparticles () and deposited utilizing sputtering targets and evaporation materials for uses such as solar energy materials and fuel cells. Nickel Sulfide is generally immediately available in most volumes. Ultra high purity and high purity compositions improve both optical quality and usefulness as scientific standards. Nanoscale elemental powders and suspensions, as alternative high surface area forms, may be considered. American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards. Typical and custom packaging is available. Additional technical, research and safety (MSDS) information is available as is a Reference Calculator for converting relevant units of measurement.

Nickel (Ni) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolNickel (atomic symbol: Ni, atomic number: 28) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 58.6934. Nickel Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of nickel's shells is [2, 8, 16, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar]3d8 4s2. Nickel was first discovered by Alex Constedt in 1751. The nickel atom has a radius of 124 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 184 pm. In its elemental form, nickel has a lustrous metallic silver appearance. Elemental Nickel Nickel is a hard and ductile transition metal that is considered corrosion-resistant because of its slow rate of oxidation. It is one of four elements that are ferromagnetic and is used in the production of various type of magnets for commercial use. Nickel is sometimes found free in nature but is more commonly found in ores. The bulk of mined nickel comes from laterite and magmatic sulfide ores. The name originates from the German word kupfernickel, which means "false copper" from the illusory copper color of the ore. For more information on nickel, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of nickel products, visit the Nickel element page.

Sulfur Bohr ModelSulfur (S) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolSulfur or Sulphur (atomic symbol: S, atomic number: 16) is a Block P, Group 16, Period 3 element with an atomic radius of 32.066. The number of electrons in each of Sulfur's shells is 2, 8, 6 and its electron configuration is [Ne] 3s2 3p4. In its elemental form, sulfur has a light yellow appearance. The sulfur atom has a covalent radius of 105 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 180 pm. In nature, sulfur can be found in hot springs, meteorites, volcanoes, and as galena, gypsum, and epsom salts. Sulfur has been known since ancient times but was not accepted as an element until 1777, when Antoine Lavoisier helped to convince the scientific community that it was an element and not a compound. For more information on sulfur, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of sulfur products, visit the Sulfur element page.


HEALTH, SAFETY & TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION
Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS
Signal Word N/A
Hazard Statements N/A
Hazard Codes N/A
Risk Codes N/A
Safety Precautions N/A
RTECS Number N/A
Transport Information N/A
WGK Germany N/A
Globally Harmonized System of
Classification and Labelling (GHS)
N/A        

NICKEL SULFIDE SYNONYMS
Mononickel monosulfide; Nickelous sulfide; Nickel sulfide [Nickel and nickel compounds]; Nickel monosulfide; beta Nickel sulfide; thioxonickel; Nickel(2+) sulfide; Nickel sulfide (NiS); 1-iodopyrrolidine-2,5-dione; sulfanylidenenickel; Millerite; Nickelous sulfide; nickel subsulfide; nickel; thioxonickel; nickel; sulfanylidenenickel

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Nickel Copper Iron Alloy Nickel Foil Nickel Nanoparticles Nickel Molybdenum Alloy Nickel Pellets
Nickel Oxide Pellets Nickel Powder Nickel Oxide Nickel Sputtering Target Nickel Acetylacetonate
Nickel Sulfate Nickel Metal Nickel Chloride Nickel Acetate Nickel Rod
Show Me MORE Forms of Nickel

PACKAGING SPECIFICATIONS FOR BULK & RESEARCH QUANTITIES
Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.


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Recent Research & Development for Nickel

  • Association Model for Nickel and Vanadium with Asphaltene during Solvent Deasphalting. Chuanbo Yu, Linzhou Zhang, Xiuying Guo, Zhiming Xu, Xuewen Sun, Chunming Xu, and Suoqi Zhao. Energy Fuels: February 12, 2015
  • Coke Minimization during Conversion of Biogas to Syngas by Bimetallic Tungsten-Nickel Incorporated Mesoporous Alumina Synthesized by the One-Pot Route. Huseyin Arbag, Sena Yasyerli, Nail Yasyerli, Gulsen Dogu, Timur Dogu, Ilja Gasan Osojnik Crnivec, and Albin Pintar. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.: February 12, 2015
  • Cleavage of lignin-derived 4-O-5 aryl ethers over nickel nanoparticles supported on niobic acid-activated carbon composites. Shaohua Jin, Zihui Xiao, Xiao Chen, Lei Wang, Jin Guo, Miao Zhang, and Changhai Liang. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.: February 10, 2015
  • Visible Light Mediated Cyclization of Tertiary Anilines with Maleimides Using Nickel(II) Oxide Surface-Modified Titanium Dioxide Catalyst. Jian Tang, Günter Grampp, Yun Liu, Bing-Xiang Wang, Fei-Fei Tao, Li-Jun Wang, Xue-Zheng Liang, Hui-Quan Xiao, and Yong-Miao Shen. J. Org. Chem.: February 2, 2015
  • Enhancement of Nitrite and Nitrate Electrocatalytic Reduction through the Employment of Self-Assembled Layers of Nickel- and Copper-Substituted Crown-Type Heteropolyanions. Shahzad Imar, Chiara Maccato, Calum Dickinson, et. al. Langmuir: February 2, 2015
  • Selective N-Methylation of Aliphatic Amines with CO2 and Hydrosilanes Using Nickel-Phosphine Catalysts. Lucero González-Sebastián, Marcos Flores-Alamo, and Juventino J. García. Organometallics: January 30, 2015
  • Structural and Chemical Evolution of Amorphous Nickel Iron Complex Hydroxide upon Lithiation/Delithiation. Kai-Yang Niu, Feng Lin, Liang Fang, Dennis Nordlund, Runzhe Tao, Tsu-Chien Weng, Marca Doeff, and Haimei Zheng. Chem. Mater.: January 27, 2015
  • Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Ethylene Reaction on Nickel (111) Surface. Rizal Arifin, Yasushi Shibuta, Kohei Shimamura, Fuyuki Shimojo, and Shu Yamaguchi. J. Phys. Chem. C: January 23, 2015
  • Synthesis, Structure, and Solution Dynamic Behavior of Nickel Complexes Bearing a 1,3-Diallyl-Substituted NHC Ligand. Agata Wodarska, Andrzej Kozio, Maciej Dranka, Adam Gryff-Keller, Przemysaw Szczeciski, Jakub Jurkowski, and Antoni Pietrzykowski. Organometallics: January 22, 2015
  • Synthesis and Characterization of Ferrocene-Chelating Heteroscorpionate Complexes of Nickel(II) and Zinc(II). Mark Abubekerov and Paula L. Diaconescu. Inorg. Chem.: January 21, 2015

Recent Research & Development for Sulfides

  • Intermolecular Interaction in the Formaldehyde – Dimethyl Ether and Formaldehyde – Dimethyl Sulfide Complexes Investigated by Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy and Ab Initio Calculations. Yoshio Tatamitani, Yoshiyuki Kawashima, Yoshihiro Osamura, and Eizi Hirota. J. Phys. Chem. A: February 13, 2015
  • Pyridine-Biquinoline-Metal Complexes for Sensing Pyrophosphate and Hydrogen Sulfide in Aqueous Buffer and in Cells. Zijuan Hai, Yajie Bao, Qingqing Miao, Xiaoyi Yi, and Gaolin Liang. Anal. Chem.: February 12, 2015
  • Design of Lead Telluride Based Thermoelectric Materials through Incorporation of Lead Sulfide Inclusions or Ligand Stripping of Nano-Sized Building Blocks. Derak James, Xu Lu, Alexander Chi Nguyen, Donald T. Morelli, and Stephanie L. Brock. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 11, 2015
  • Reduction of Nitroaromatics Sorbed to Black Carbon by Direct Reaction with Sorbed Sulfides. Wenqing Xu, Joseph J. Pignatello, and William Armistead Mitch. Environ. Sci. Technol.: February 11, 2015
  • Classification of Zinc Sulfide Quantum Dots by Size: Insights into the Particle Surface–Solvent Interaction of Colloids. Doris Segets, Christian Lutz, Kyoko Yamamoto, So Komada, Sebastian Süß, Yasushige Mori, and Wolfgang Peukert. J. Phys. Chem. C: January 29, 2015
  • Double Metal Ions Synergistic Effect in Hierarchical Multiple Sulfide Microflowers for Enhanced Supercapacitor Performance. Yang Gao, Liwei Mi, Wutao Wei, Shizhong Cui, Zhi Zheng, Hongwei Hou, and Weihua Chen. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 27, 2015
  • Reductive Transformation of Tetrachloroethene Catalyzed by Sulfide–Cobalamin in Nano-Mackinawite Suspension. Daeseung Kyung, Amnorzahira Amir, Kyunghoon Choi, and Woojin Lee. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.: January 26, 2015
  • Molecularly Engineered Quantum Dots for Visualization of Hydrogen Sulfide. Yehan Yan, Huan Yu, Yajiao Zhang, Kui Zhang, Houjuan Zhu, Tao Yu, Hui Jiang, and Suhua Wang. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 23, 2015
  • Plasmonic Copper Sulfide Nanocrystals Exhibiting Near-Infrared Photothermal and Photodynamic Therapeutic Effects. Shunhao Wang, Andreas Riedinger, Hongbo Li, Changhui Fu, Huiyu Liu, Linlin Li, Tianlong Liu, Longfei Tan, Markus J. Barthel, Giammarino Pugliese, Francesco De Donato, Marco Scotto D’Abbusco, Xianwei Meng, Liberato Manna, Huan Meng, and Teresa Pellegrino. ACS Nano: January 20, 2015
  • Photoinduced Carrier Dynamics of Nearly Stoichiometric Oleylamine-Protected Copper Indium Sulfide Nanoparticles and Nanodisks. Masanori Sakamoto, Lihui Chen, Makoto Okano, David M. Tex, Yoshihiko Kanemitsu, and Toshiharu Teranishi. J. Phys. Chem. C: January 19, 2015