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Nickel Titanium Bars

High Purity Ni Ti Bars


Product Product Code Request Quote
(2N) 99% Nickel Titanium Bars NITI-M-02-BBR Request Quote
(3N) 99.9% Nickel Titanium Bars NITI-M-03-BBR Request Quote
(4N) 99.99% Nickel Titanium Bars NITI-M-04-BBR Request Quote
(5N) 99.999% Nickel Titanium Bars NITI-M-05-BBR Request Quote

High   Purity Metal Bars in Secure StorageAmerican Elements' AE Bullion™ group mints certified high purity Nickel Titanium Bars for short and long term physical possession and to allow for exposure and controlled risk to industrial demand fluctuations reflected in the global nickel price. Bars are manufactured and minted under written SOPs (standard operating procedures) to assure quality and consistency by American Elements' AE Metals™ custom synthesis and refining group. Besides nickel titanium bars, nickel titanium coins and nickel titanium Ingots may be purchased by funds, currency reserves, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), private investors, collectors and hobbyists to take direct physical title and possession of the metal with risk exposure from shortages or chemical/physical technology changes, such as in solar energy, and fuel cell developments, equivalent to movements in the industrial application price of Nickel Titanium. American Elements offers bonded short and long term warehouse inventory services for AE Bullion™ coins to investors, funds and collectors who do not wish to take physical custody of the metal or lack secure storage or warehouse capabilities. The lowest possible bar unit price to Nickel Titanium melt value ratio is maintained through state of the art mint and die systems and analytically certified blanks (planchet or flan) refined and pressed to exacting purity and weight. We also produce Nickel Titanium as disc, granules, ingot, pellets, powder, rod, wire, foil, and sputtering target.. Other shapes are available by request. Nickel Titanium Bars may be purchased in bulk or small quantity. Portfolios of different elemental metal bars or coins may also be structured and purchased from the AE Bullion™ group allowing for strategic risk allocation and indexing across a basket of metals.

Nickel (Ni) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolNickel (atomic symbol: Ni, atomic number: 28) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 58.6934. Nickel Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of nickel's shells is [2, 8, 16, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar]3d8 4s2. Nickel was first discovered by Alex Constedt in 1751. The nickel atom has a radius of 124 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 184 pm. In its elemental form, nickel has a lustrous metallic silver appearance. Elemental Nickel Nickel is a hard and ductile transition metal that is considered corrosion-resistant because of its slow rate of oxidation. It is one of four elements that are ferromagnetic and is used in the production of various type of magnets for commercial use. Nickel is sometimes found free in nature but is more commonly found in ores. The bulk of mined nickel comes from laterite and magmatic sulfide ores. The name originates from the German word kupfernickel, which means "false copper" from the illusory copper color of the ore. For more information on nickel, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of nickel products, visit the Nickel element page.

Titanium (Ti) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolTitanium (atomic symbol: Ti, atomic number: 22) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 47.867. The number of electrons in each of Titanium's shells is [2, 8, 10, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d2 4s2. Titanium Bohr ModelThe titanium atom has a radius of 147 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 187 pm. Titanium was discovered by William Gregor in 1791 and first isolated by Jöns Jakob Berzelius in 1825. In its elemental form, titanium has a silvery grey-white metallic appearance. Titanium's properties are chemically and physically similar to zirconium, both of which have the same number of valence electrons and are in the same group in the periodic table.Elemental Titanium Titanium has five naturally occurring isotopes: 46Ti through 50Ti, with 48Ti being the most abundant (73.8%). Titanium is found in igneous rocks and the sediments derived from them. It is named after the word Titanos, which is Greek for Titans. For more information on titanium, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of titanium products, visit the Titanium element page.



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PACKAGING SPECIFICATIONS FOR BULK & RESEARCH QUANTITIES
Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.


Have a Question? Ask a Chemical Engineer or Material Scientist
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Recent Research & Development for Nickel

  • Association Model for Nickel and Vanadium with Asphaltene during Solvent Deasphalting. Chuanbo Yu, Linzhou Zhang, Xiuying Guo, Zhiming Xu, Xuewen Sun, Chunming Xu, and Suoqi Zhao. Energy Fuels: February 12, 2015
  • Coke Minimization during Conversion of Biogas to Syngas by Bimetallic Tungsten-Nickel Incorporated Mesoporous Alumina Synthesized by the One-Pot Route. Huseyin Arbag, Sena Yasyerli, Nail Yasyerli, Gulsen Dogu, Timur Dogu, Ilja Gasan Osojnik Crnivec, and Albin Pintar. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.: February 12, 2015
  • Cleavage of lignin-derived 4-O-5 aryl ethers over nickel nanoparticles supported on niobic acid-activated carbon composites. Shaohua Jin, Zihui Xiao, Xiao Chen, Lei Wang, Jin Guo, Miao Zhang, and Changhai Liang. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.: February 10, 2015
  • Visible Light Mediated Cyclization of Tertiary Anilines with Maleimides Using Nickel(II) Oxide Surface-Modified Titanium Dioxide Catalyst. Jian Tang, Günter Grampp, Yun Liu, Bing-Xiang Wang, Fei-Fei Tao, Li-Jun Wang, Xue-Zheng Liang, Hui-Quan Xiao, and Yong-Miao Shen. J. Org. Chem.: February 2, 2015
  • Enhancement of Nitrite and Nitrate Electrocatalytic Reduction through the Employment of Self-Assembled Layers of Nickel- and Copper-Substituted Crown-Type Heteropolyanions. Shahzad Imar, Chiara Maccato, Calum Dickinson, et. al. Langmuir: February 2, 2015
  • Selective N-Methylation of Aliphatic Amines with CO2 and Hydrosilanes Using Nickel-Phosphine Catalysts. Lucero González-Sebastián, Marcos Flores-Alamo, and Juventino J. García. Organometallics: January 30, 2015
  • Structural and Chemical Evolution of Amorphous Nickel Iron Complex Hydroxide upon Lithiation/Delithiation. Kai-Yang Niu, Feng Lin, Liang Fang, Dennis Nordlund, Runzhe Tao, Tsu-Chien Weng, Marca Doeff, and Haimei Zheng. Chem. Mater.: January 27, 2015
  • Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Ethylene Reaction on Nickel (111) Surface. Rizal Arifin, Yasushi Shibuta, Kohei Shimamura, Fuyuki Shimojo, and Shu Yamaguchi. J. Phys. Chem. C: January 23, 2015
  • Synthesis, Structure, and Solution Dynamic Behavior of Nickel Complexes Bearing a 1,3-Diallyl-Substituted NHC Ligand. Agata Wodarska, Andrzej Kozio, Maciej Dranka, Adam Gryff-Keller, Przemysaw Szczeciski, Jakub Jurkowski, and Antoni Pietrzykowski. Organometallics: January 22, 2015
  • Synthesis and Characterization of Ferrocene-Chelating Heteroscorpionate Complexes of Nickel(II) and Zinc(II). Mark Abubekerov and Paula L. Diaconescu. Inorg. Chem.: January 21, 2015

Recent Research & Development for Titanium

  • Bottom-up synthesis of titanate nanosheets and their morphology change by the addition of organic ligands and dialysis. Takayuki Ban, Takuya Nakagawa, and Yutaka Ohya. Crystal Growth & Design: February 16, 2015
  • Effect of the Duration of UV Irradiation on the Anticoagulant Properties of Titanium Dioxide Films. Jiang Chen, Ping Yang, Yuzhen Liao, Jinbiao Wang, Huiqing Chen, Hong Sun, and Nan Huang. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: February 13, 2015
  • Macroporous Titanate Nanotube/TiO2 Monolith for Fast and Large-Capacity Cation Exchange. Kenji Okada, Genki Asakura, Yasuaki Tokudome, Atsushi Nakahira, and Masahide Takahashi. Chem. Mater.: February 9, 2015
  • Titanium-defected undoped anatase TiO2 with p-type conductivity, room-temperature ferromagnetism and remarkable photocatalytic performance. Songbo Wang, Lun Pan, Jia-Jia Song, Wenbo Mi, Ji-Jun Zou, Li Wang, and Xiangwen Zhang. J. Am. Chem. Soc.: February 6, 2015
  • Synergistic Effect of Titanate-Anatase Heterostructure and Hydrogenation-Induced Surface Disorder on Photocatalytic Water Splitting. Jinmeng Cai, Yingming Zhu, Dongsheng Liu, Ming Meng, Zhenpeng Hu, and Zheng Jiang. ACS Catal.: February 6, 2015
  • Nitrogen Doped 3D Titanium Dioxide Nanorods Architecture with Significantly Enhanced Visible Light Photoactivity. Zhaodong Li, Fei Wang, Alexander Kvit, and Xudong Wang. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 3, 2015
  • Visible Light Mediated Cyclization of Tertiary Anilines with Maleimides Using Nickel(II) Oxide Surface-Modified Titanium Dioxide Catalyst. Jian Tang, Günter Grampp, Yun Liu, Bing-Xiang Wang, Fei-Fei Tao, Li-Jun Wang, Xue-Zheng Liang, Hui-Quan Xiao, and Yong-Miao Shen. J. Org. Chem.: February 2, 2015
  • Modulation of Pore Sizes of Titanium Dioxide Photocatalysts by a Facile Template Free Hydrothermal Synthesis Method: Implications for Photocatalytic Degradation of Rhodamine B. Shivatharsiny Rasalingam, Chia-Ming Wu, and Ranjit T. Koodali. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 29, 2015
  • The Electrorheological Behavior of Suspensions Based on Molten-Salt Synthesized Lithium Titanate Nanoparticles and Their Core–Shell Titanate/Urea Analogues. T. Plachy, M. Mrlik, Z. Kozakova, P. Suly, M. Sedlacik, V. Pavlinek, and I. Kuritka. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 29, 2015
  • Pulsed Laser-Assisted Focused Electron-Beam-Induced Etching of Titanium with XeF2: Enhanced Reaction Rate and Precursor Transport. J. H. Noh, J. D. Fowlkes, R. Timilsina, M. G. Stanford, B. B. Lewis, and P. D. Rack. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 28, 2015