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Iron Phosphide

FeP
CAS 12751-22-3


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(5N) 99.999% Iron Phosphide Powder FE-P-05-P Request Quote
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(5N) 99.999% Iron Phosphide Lump FE-P-05-L Request Quote
(5N) 99.999% Iron Phosphide Sputtering Target FE-P-05-ST Request Quote
(5N) 99.999% Iron Phosphide Wafer FE-P-05-WSX Request Quote

CHEMICAL
IDENTIFIER
Formula CAS No. PubChem SID PubChem CID MDL No. EC No IUPAC Name Beilstein
Re. No.
SMILES
Identifier
InChI
Identifier
InChI
Key
FeP 12751-22-3 46234708 159456 N/A 235-798-1 iron(3+); phosphorus(3-) N/A [Fe]#P InChI=1S/Fe.P DPTATFGPDCLUTF-UHFFFAOYSA-N

PROPERTIES Compound Formula Mol. Wt. Appearance Density Exact Mass Monoisotopic Mass Charge MSDS
FeP 86.82 Gray, hexagonal needles or blue-gray powder N/A N/A 86.908707 N/A Safety Data Sheet

Phosphide IonIron Phosphide is a semiconductor used in high power, high frequency applications and in laser diodes. American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards. Typical and custom packaging is available. Additional technical, research and safety (MSDS) information is available as is a Reference Calculator for converting relevant units of measurement.

Iron (Fe) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolIron (atomic symbol: Fe, atomic number: 26) is a Block D, Group 8, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 55.845. The number of electrons in each of Iron's shells is 2, 8, 14, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d6 4s2.Iron Bohr Model The iron atom has a radius of 126 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 194 pm. Iron was discovered by humans before 5000 BC. In its elemental form, iron has a lustrous grayish metallic appearance. Elemental Iron Iron is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust and the most common element by mass forming the earth as a whole. Iron is rarely found as a free element, since it tends to oxidize easily; it is usually found in minerals such as magnetite, hematite, goethite, limonite, or siderite. Though pure iron is typically soft, the addition of carbon creates the alloy known as steel, which is significantly stronger. For more information on iron, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of iron products, visit the Iron element page.

Phosphorus(P) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolPhosphorus Bohr ModelPhosphorus (atomic symbol: P, atomic number: 15) is a Block P, Group 15, Period 3 element. The number of electrons in each of Phosphorus's shells is 2, 8, 5 and its electronic configuration is [Ne] 3s2 3p3. The phosphorus atom has a radius of 110.5.pm and its Van der Waals radius is 180.pm. Phosphorus is a highly-reactive non-metallic element (sometimes considered a metalloid) with two primary allotropes, white phosphorus and red phosphorus; its black flaky appearance is similar to graphitic carbon. Compound forms of phosphorus include phosphates and phosphides. Phosphorous was first recognized as an element by Hennig Brand in 1669; its name (phosphorus mirabilis, or "bearer of light") was inspired from the brilliant glow emitted by its distillation. For more information on phosphorus, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of phosphorus products, visit the Phosphorus element page.


HEALTH, SAFETY & TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION
Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS
Signal Word N/A
Hazard Statements N/A
Hazard Codes N/A
Risk Codes N/A
Safety Precautions N/A
RTECS Number N/A
Transport Information N/A
WGK Germany N/A
Globally Harmonized System of
Classification and Labelling (GHS)
N/A        

IRON PHOSPHIDE SYNONYMS
ferric phosphorus(-3) anion, Ferrophosphide, Triiron phosphide

CUSTOMERS FOR IRON PHOSPHIDE HAVE ALSO LOOKED AT
Iron Pellets Iron Oxide Iron Nitrate Iron Oxide Pellets Iron Nanoparticles
Iron Chloride Iron Acetylacetonate Iron Bars Iron Foil Aluminum Iron Alloy
Zirconium Scandium Iron Alloy Iron Fluoride Iron Metal Iron Acetate Iron Sputtering Target
Show Me MORE Forms of Iron

PACKAGING SPECIFICATIONS FOR BULK & RESEARCH QUANTITIES
Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.


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Recent Research & Development for Iron

  • Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exert an inhibition on hepcidin expression through an estrogen-like effect associated with disordered systemic iron homeostasis. Yi Qian, Shuping Zhang, Wenli Guo, Juan Ma, Yue Chen, Lei Wang, Meirong Zhao, and Sijin Liu. Chem. Res. Toxicol.: February 16, 2015
  • pH-Responsive Iron Manganese Silicate Nanoparticles as T1-T2* Dual-Modal Imaging Probes for Tumor Diagnosis. Jian Chen, Weijie Zhang, Zhen Guo, Haibao Wang, Dongdong Wang, Jiajia Zhou, and Qianwang Chen. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: February 16, 2015
  • Hollow Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Polymer Nanobeads as MRI Contrast Agents. Nadja C Bigall, Enrico Dilena, Dirk Dorfs, Marie-Lys Beoutis, Giammarino Pugliese, Claire Wilhelm, Florence Gazeau, Abid Ali Khan, Alexander M Bittner, Miguel Angel Garcia, Mar Garcia-Hernandez, Liberato Manna, and Teresa Pellegrino. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 16, 2015
  • Stable isotopes and iron oxide mineral products as markers of chemodenitrification. L Camille Jones, Brian Peters, Juan S. Lezama Pacheco, Karen Casciotti, and Scott Fendorf. Environ. Sci. Technol.: February 16, 2015
  • Preparation of Unsupported Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst by Simple, Novel, Solvent Deficient Precipitation (SDP) Method. Kyle M. Brunner, Grant E. Harper, Kamyar Keyvanloo, Brian F. Woodfield, Calvin H. Bartholomew, and William C. Hecker. Energy Fuels: February 15, 2015
  • Manganese Doped Iron Oxide Theranostic Nanoparticles for Combined T1 Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Photothermal Therapy. Mengxin Zhang, Yuhua Cao, Lina Wang, Yufei Ma, Xiaolong Tu, and Zhijun Zhang. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: February 12, 2015
  • Iron- and Indium-Catalyzed Reactions toward Nitrogen- and Oxygen-Containing Saturated Heterocycles. Johan Cornil, Laurine Gonnard, Charlélie Bensoussan, Anna Serra-Muns, Christian Gnamm, Claude Commandeur, Malgorzata Commandeur, Sébastien Reymond, Amandine Guérinot, and Janine Cossy. Acc. Chem. Res.: February 12, 2015
  • Unraveling the structure of Iron(III) oxalate tetrahydrate and its reversible Li insertion capability. Hania Ahouari, Gwenaelle Rousse, Juan Jose Rodriguez-Carvajal, Moulay Tahar Sougrati, Matthieu Saubanère, Matthieu Courty, Nadir Recham, and Jean-Marie Tarascon. Chem. Mater.: February 12, 2015
  • Role of Surface Chemistry and Morphology in Reactive Adsorption Of H2S on Iron (Hydr)oxides/Graphite Oxide Composites. Javier A. Arcibar-Orozco, Rajiv Wallace, Joshua K. Mitchell, and Teresa J Bandosz. Langmuir: February 12, 2015
  • Surface and Interfacial Engineering of Iron Oxide Nanoplates for Highly Efficient Magnetic Resonance Angiography. Zijian Zhou, Changqiang Wu, Hanyu Liu, Xianglong Zhu, Zhenghuan Zhao, Lirong Wang, Ye Xu, Hua Ai, and Jinhao Gao. ACS Nano: February 11, 2015