Skip to Page Content

Platinum Chunk

High Purity Pt Chunk
CAS 7440-06-4


Product Product Code Request Quote
(2N) 99% Platinum Chunk PT-M-02-CK Request Quote
(3N) 99.9% Platinum Chunk PT-M-03-CK Request Quote
(4N) 99.99% Platinum Chunk PT-M-04-CK Request Quote
(5N) 99.999% Platinum Chunk PT-M-05-CK Request Quote

CHEMICAL
IDENTIFIER
Formula CAS No. PubChem SID PubChem CID MDL No. EC No Beilstein
Re. No.
SMILES
Identifier
InChI
Identifier
InChI
Key
Pt 7440-06-4 24868136 23939 MFCD00011179 231-116-1 N/A [Pt] InChI=1S/Pt BASFCYQUMIYNBI-UHFFFAOYSA-N

PROPERTIES Mol. Wt. Appearance Density Tensile Strength Melting Point Boiling Point Thermal Conductivity Electrical Resistivity Eletronegativity Specific Heat Heat of Vaporization Heat of Fusion MSDS
195.08 Gray Chunk 21.45 gm/cc N/A 1772°C 3827 °C 0.716 W/cm/K @ 298.2 K 10.6 microhm-cm @ 20°C 2.2 Paulings 0.0317 Cal/g/K @ 25°C 122 K-Cal/gm atom at 3827°C 4.70 Cal/gm mole Safety Data Sheet


High Purity ChunkAmerican Elements specializes in producing high purity Platinum Chunks are produced using crystallization, solid state and other ultra high purification processes such as sublimation. Standard Chunk pieces are amorphous uniform pieces ranging in size from 5-15 mm. American Elements specializes in producing custom compositions for commercial and research applications and for new proprietary technologies. American Elements also casts any of the rare earth metals and most other advanced materials into granules, rod, bar or plate form, as well as other machined shapes and through other processes such as nanoparticles and in the form of solutions and organometallics. We also produce Platinum as rod, pellets, powder, pieces, disc, ingot, wire, and in compound forms, such as oxide. Other shapes are available by request.

Platinum (Pt) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolPlatinum (atomic symbol: Pt, atomic number: 78) is a Block D, Group 10, Period 6 element with an atomic weight of 195.084. Platinum Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of platinum's shells is [2, 8, 18, 32, 17, 1] and its electron configuration is [Xe] 4f14 5d9 6s1. The platinum atom has a radius of 139 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 175 pm. Platinum was discovered and first isolated by Antonio de Ulloa in 1735. Elemental PlatinumIt is one of the rarest elements in the earth's crust, occurring at a concentration of only 0.005 ppm. Platinum is found uncombined as a free element and alloyed with iridium as platiniridium. In its elemental form, platinum has a grayish white appearance. It is highly resistant to corrosion: the metal does not oxidize in air at any temperature. It is generally non-reactive, even at high temperatures. The origin of the name "platinum" comes from the Spanish word platina, meaning silver. For more information on platinum, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of platinum products, visit the Platinum element page.



HEALTH, SAFETY & TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
TP2160000
N/A
nwg
N/A        

CUSTOMERS FOR PLATINUM CHUNK HAVE ALSO LOOKED AT
Platinum Fluoride Platinum Acetylacetonate Platinum Metal Platinum Chloride Platinum Foil
Platinum Rhodium Alloy Platinum Acetate Solution Platinum Oxide Nanopowder Platinum Pellets Platinum Powder
Platinum Sputtering Target Platinum Oxide Platinum Oxide Pellets Platinum Wire Platinum Iridium Alloy
Show Me MORE Forms of Platinum

PACKAGING SPECIFICATIONS FOR BULK & RESEARCH QUANTITIES
Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.


Have a Question? Ask a Chemical Engineer or Material Scientist
Request an MSDS or Certificate of Analysis

Recent Research & Development for Platinum

  • Catalytically Activated Palladium-Platinum Nanowires for Accelerated Hydrogen Gas Detection. Xiaowei Li, Yu Liu, John C. Hemminger, and Reginald M. Penner. ACS Nano: February 13, 2015
  • Platinum-Catalyzed Asymmetric Ring-Opening Reactions of Oxabenzonorbornadienes with Phenols. Ling Meng, Wen Yang, Xuejing Pan, Meng Tao, Guo Cheng, Sanyong Wang, Heping Zeng, Yuhua Long, and Dingqiao Yang. J. Org. Chem.: February 13, 2015
  • Investigating the Interfacial Properties of Electrochemically-Roughened Platinum Electrodes for Neural Stimulation. Alexander Weremfo, Paul Carter, David Brynn Hibbert, and Chuan Zhao. Langmuir: February 10, 2015
  • Atomic Layer-by-Layer Deposition of Platinum on Palladium Octahedra for Enhanced Catalysts toward the Oxygen Reduction Reaction. Jinho Park, Lei Zhang, Sang-Il Choi, Luke T. Roling, Ning Lu, Jeffrey A. Herron, Shuifen Xie, Jinguo Wang, Moon J. Kim, Manos Mavrikakis, and Younan Xia. ACS Nano: February 8, 2015
  • Platinum-Ruthenium Heterogeneous Catalytic Anodes Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition for Use in Direct Methanol Solid Oxide Fuel Cells. Heon Jae Jeong, Jun Woo Kim, Kiho Bae, Hojean Jung, and Joon Hyung Shim. ACS Catal.: February 6, 2015
  • Dual-Funcaitional Analogous cis-platinum Complex with High Antitumor Activities and Two-photon Bioimaging. Qiong Zhang, Xiaohe Tian, Guiju Hu, Pengfei Shi, Jieying Wu, Shengli Li, Hongping Zhou, Bao-Kang Jin, Jiaxiang Yang, Shengyi Zhang, and Yupeng Tian. Biochemistry: 42039
  • Platinum-Doped Ceria Based Biosensor for in Vitro and in Vivo Monitoring of Lactate during Hypoxia. Naimish P. Sardesai, Mallikarjunarao Ganesana, Anahita Karimi, James C. Leiter, and Silvana Andreescu. Anal. Chem.: January 28, 2015
  • Fast-Response Room Temperature Hydrogen Gas Sensors Using Platinum-Coated Spin-Capable Carbon Nanotubes. Daewoong Jung, Maeum Han, and Gil S. Lee. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 26, 2015
  • Global Mining Risk Footprint of Critical Metals Necessary for Low-Carbon Technologies: The Case of Neodymium, Cobalt, and Platinum in Japan. Keisuke Nansai, Kenichi Nakajima, Shigemi Kagawa, Yasushi Kondo, Yosuke Shigetomi, and Sangwon Suh. Environ. Sci. Technol.: 42030