Tin Sulfate Solution

AE Solutions™ SnSO4
CAS 7488-55-3


Product Product Code Order or Specifications
(2N) 99% Tin Sulfate Solution SN-SAT-02-SOL Contact American Elements
(3N) 99.9% Tin Sulfate Solution SN-SAT-03-SOL Contact American Elements
(4N) 99.99% Tin Sulfate Solution SN-SAT-04-SOL Contact American Elements
(5N) 99.999% Tin Sulfate Solution SN-SAT-05-SOL Contact American Elements

CHEMICAL
IDENTIFIER
Formula CAS No. PubChem SID PubChem CID MDL No. EC No IUPAC Name Beilstein
Re. No.
SMILES
Identifier
InChI
Identifier
InChI
Key
SnSO4 7488-55-3 24854690 62643 MFCD00011246 N/A Tin(+2) cation sulfate N/A [O-]S(=O)(=O)[O-].[Sn+2] InChI=1S/H2O4S.Sn/c1-5(2,3)4;/h(H2,1,2,3,4);/q;+2/p-2 OBBXFSIWZVFYJR-UHFFFAOYSA-L

PROPERTIES Compound Formula Mol. Wt. Appearance Melting Point Boiling Point Density

Exact Mass

Monoisotopic Mass Charge MSDS
O4SSn 214.75 White-Yellowish Crystalline Solid 378° C
(712.4° F)
decomposes to SnO2 and SO2 4.15 g/cm3 N/A N/A 0 Safety Data Sheet

Sulfate IonTin Sulfate Solutions are moderate to highly concentrated liquid solutions of Tin Sulfate. They are an excellent source of Tin Sulfate for applications requiring solubilized Compound Solutions Packaging, Bulk Quantity materials. American Elements can prepare dissolved homogenous solutions at customer specified concentrations or to the maximum stoichiometric concentration. Packaging is available in 55 gallon drums, smaller units and larger liquid totes. American Elements maintains solution production facilities in the United States, Northern Europe (Liverpool, UK), Southern Europe (Milan, Italy), Australia and China to allow for lower freight costs and quicker delivery to our customers. .American Elements metal and rare earth compound solutions have numerous applications, but are commonly used in petrochemical cracking and automotive catalysts, water treatment, plating, textiles, research and in optic, laser, crystal and glass applications. Ultra high purity and high purity compositions improve both optical quality and usefulness as scientific standards. Nanoscale (See also Nanotechnology Information and Quantum Dots) elemental powders and suspensions, as alternative high surface area forms, may be considered. We also produce Tin Sulfate Powder.Sulfate compounds are salts or esters of sulfuric acid formed by replacing one or both of the hydrogens with a metal. Most metal sulfate compounds are readily soluble in water for uses such as water treatment, unlike fluorides and oxides which tend to be insoluble. Organometallic forms are soluble in organic solutions and sometimes in both aqueous and organic solutions. Metallic ions can also be dispersed utilizing suspended or coated nanoparticles (See also application discussion at Nanotechnology Information and at Quantum Dots) and deposited utilizing sputtering targets and evaporation materials for uses such as solar energy materials and fuel cells. American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards. Typical and custom packaging is available. Additional technical, research and safety (MSDS) information is available as is a Reference Calculator for converting relevant units of measurement.

Tin Bohr ModelTin (Sn) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolTin (atomic symbol: Sn, atomic number: 50) is a Block P, Group 14, Period 5 element with an atomic weight of 118.710. The number of electrons in each of tin's shells is 2, 8, 18, 18, 4 and its electron configuration is [Kr] 4d10 5s2 5p2. The tin atom has a radius of 140.5 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 217 pm.In its elemental form, tin has a silvery-gray metallic appearance. It is malleable, ductile and highly crystalline. High Purity (99.9999%) Tin (Sn) MetalTin has nine stable isotopes and 18 unstable isotopes. Under 3.72 degrees Kelvin, Tin becomes a superconductor. Applications for tin include soldering, plating, and such alloys as pewter. The first uses of tin can be dated to the Bronze Age around 3000 BC in which tin and copper were combined to make the alloy bronze. The origin of the word tin comes from the Latin word Stannum which translates to the Anglo-Saxon word tin. For more information on tin, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of tin products, visit the Tin Information Center.

Sulfur Bohr ModelSulfur (S) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolSulfur or Sulphur (atomic symbol: S, atomic number: 16) is a Block P, Group 16, Period 3 element with an atomic radius of 32.066. The number of electrons in each of Sulfur's shells is 2, 8, 6 and its electron configuration is [Ne]3s2 3p4. In its elemental form, sulfur has a light yellow appearance. The sulfur atom has a covalent radius of 105 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 180 pm. In nature, sulfur can be found in hot springs, meteorites, volcanoes, and as galena, gypsum, and epsom salts. Sulfur has been known since ancient times but was not accepted as an element until 1777 when Antoine Lavoisier helped to convince the scientific community that it was an element and not a compound. For more information on sulfur, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of sulfur products, visit the Sulfur Information Center.

HEALTH, SAFETY & TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION
Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS
Signal Word Warning
Hazard Statements H315-H319-H335
Hazard Codes Xi
Risk Codes 36/37/38
Safety Precautions 26-36
RTECS Number N/A
Transport Information N/A
WGK Germany nwg
Globally Harmonized System of
Classification and Labelling (GHS)
Exclamation Mark-Acute Toxicity        

TIN SULFATE SYNONYMS
Tin(4+) disulfate, Tin(+2) cation sulfate, Tin(II) sulfate, Stannous sulfate

CUSTOMERS FOR TIN SULFATE SOLUTION HAVE ALSO LOOKED AT
Bismuth Indium Tin Alloy Tin Acetate Tin Metal Tin Oxide Tin Chloride
Tin Pellets Tin Oxide Pellets Gold Tin Alloy Tin Nitrate Tin Acetylacetonate
Tin Foil Tin Rod Tin Nanoparticles Tin Powder Tin Sputtering Target
Show Me MORE Forms of Tin

PACKAGING SPECIFICATIONS FOR BULK & RESEARCH QUANTITIES
Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.


Have a Question? Ask a Chemical Engineer or Material Scientist
Request an MSDS or Certificate of Analysis





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Recent Research & Development for Tin

  • K. Jeyadheepan, M. Thamilselvan, Kyunghae Kim, Junsin Yi, C. Sanjeeviraja, Optoelectronic properties of R-F magnetron sputtered Cadmium Tin Oxide (Cd2SnO4) thin films for CdS/CdTe thin film solar cell applications, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 620, 25 January 2015
  • Abdullah M. Al-Hamdi, Mika Sillanpää, Joydeep Dutta, Photocatalytic degradation of phenol by iodine doped tin oxide nanoparticles under UV and sunlight irradiation, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 618, 5 January 2015
  • A.D. Pogrebnjak, D. Eyidi, G. Abadias, O.V. Bondar, V.M. Beresnev, O.V. Sobol, Structure and properties of arc evaporated nanoscale TiN/MoN multilayered systems, International Journal of Refractory Metals and Hard Materials, Volume 48, January 2015
  • M. Popovic, M. Novakovic, M. Mitric, K. Zhang, N. Bibic, Structural, optical and electrical properties of argon implanted TiN thin films, International Journal of Refractory Metals and Hard Materials, Volume 48, January 2015
  • Shuang Ma Andersen, Casper Frydendal Nørgaard, Mikkel Juul Larsen, Eivind Skou, Tin Dioxide as an Effective Antioxidant for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells, Journal of Power Sources, Volume 273, 1 January 2015
  • Dongsheng Guan, Jianyang Li, Xianfeng Gao, Chris Yuan, A comparative study of enhanced electrochemical stability of tin–nickel alloy anode for high-performance lithium ion battery, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 617, 25 December 2014
  • Xiaowei Liu, Donghua Teng, Ting Li, Yunhua Yu, Xiaohong Shao, Xiaoping Yang, Phosphorus-doped tin oxides/carbon nanofibers webs as lithium-ion battery anodes with enhanced reversible capacity, Journal of Power Sources, Volume 272, 25 December 2014
  • Lulu Chen, Xiaodong Li, Youqing Wang, Caitian Gao, Hang Zhang, Bo Zhao, Feng Teng, Jinyuan Zhou, Zhenxing Zhang, Xiaojun Pan, Erqing Xie, Low-temperature synthesis of tin dioxide hollow nanospheres and their potential applications in dye-sensitized solar cells and photoelectrochemical type self-powered ultraviolet photodetectors, Journal of Power Sources, Volume 272, 25 December 2014
  • Qinian Wang, Heng Dong, Hongbing Yu, Development of rolling tin gas diffusion electrode for carbon dioxide electrochemical reduction to produce formate in aqueous electrolyte, Journal of Power Sources, Volume 271, 20 December 2014
  • C.S. Ferreira, R.R. Passos, L.A. Pocrifka, Synthesis and properties of ternary mixture of nickel/cobalt/tin oxides for supercapacitors, Journal of Power Sources, Volume 271, 20 December 2014

Recent Research & Development for Sulfates

  • Marta García-Maté, Angeles G. De la Torre, Laura León-Reina, Enrique R. Losilla, Miguel A.G. Aranda, Isabel Santacruz, Effect of calcium sulfate source on the hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate eco-cement, Cement and Concrete Composites, Volume 55, January 2015
  • Jin Gi Hong, Yongsheng Chen, Evaluation of electrochemical properties and reverse electrodialysis performance for porous cation exchange membranes with sulfate-functionalized iron oxide, Journal of Membrane Science, Volume 473, 1 January 2015
  • Jie-Cen Zhong, Fang Wan, Yan-Qiong Sun, Yi-Ping Chen, Luminescent hybrid lanthanide sulfates and lanthanide sulfonate-carboxylates with 1,10-phenanthroline involving in-situ oxidation of 2-mercaptonbenzoic acid, Journal of Solid State Chemistry, Volume 221, January 2015
  • Haihan Zhou, Gaoyi Han, Dongying Fu, Yunzhen Chang, Yaoming Xiao, Hua-Jin Zhai, Petal-shaped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/sodium dodecyl sulfate-graphene oxide intercalation composites for high-performance electrochemical energy storage, Journal of Power Sources, Volume 272, 25 December 2014
  • Edgar Ventosa, Marcel Skoumal, Francisco Javier Vázquez, Cristina Flox, Joan Ramon Morante, Operando studies of all-vanadium flow batteries: Easy-to-make reference electrode based on silver–silver sulfate, Journal of Power Sources, Volume 271, 20 December 2014
  • Xiaoshi Lang, Dianlong Wang, Chiyu Hu, Shenzhi Tang, Junsheng Zhu, Chenfeng Guo, The use of nanometer tetrabasic lead sulfate as positive active material additive for valve regulated lead-acid battery, Journal of Power Sources, Volume 270, 15 December 2014
  • L. Liu, J.P. Cheng, J. Zhang, F. Liu, X.B. Zhang, Effects of dodecyl sulfate and nitrate anions on the supercapacitive properties of α-Co(OH)2, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, Volume 615, 5 December 2014
  • J. Stroh, M.-C. Schlegel, E.F. Irassar, B. Meng, F. Emmerling, Applying high resolution SyXRD analysis on sulfate attacked concrete field samples, Cement and Concrete Research, Volume 66, December 2014
  • Neda Mobasher, Susan A. Bernal, Oday H. Hussain, David C. Apperley, Hajime Kinoshita, John L. Provis, Characterisation of Ba(OH)2–Na2SO4–blast furnace slag cement-like composites for the immobilisation of sulfate bearing nuclear wastes, Cement and Concrete Research, Volume 66, December 2014
  • Mark Whittaker, Maciej Zajac, Mohsen Ben Haha, Frank Bullerjahn, Leon Black, The role of the alumina content of slag, plus the presence of additional sulfate on the hydration and microstructure of Portland cement-slag blends, Cement and Concrete Research, Volume 66, December 2014