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Bismuth Telluride

Bi2Te3
CAS 1304-82-1


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(5N) 99.999% Bismuth Telluride Powder BI-TE-05-P Request Quote
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(5N) 99.999% Bismuth Telluride Lump BI-TE-05-L Request Quote
(5N) 99.999% Bismuth Telluride Disc BI-TE-05-D Request Quote
(5N) 99.999% Bismuth Telluride Sputtering Target BI-TE-05-ST Request Quote
(5N) 99.999% Bismuth Telluride Plate BI-TE-05-PL Request Quote
(5N) 99.999% Bismuth Telluride Wafer BI-TE-05-WSX Request Quote

CHEMICAL
IDENTIFIER
Formula CAS No. PubChem CID MDL No. EC No IUPAC Name Beilstein
Re. No.
SMILES
Identifier
InChI
Identifier
InChI
Key
Bi2Te3 1304-82-1 6379155 MFCD00014201 215-135-2 tellanylidenebismuth; tellurium N/A [Te].[Te]=
[Bi].[Te]=[Bi]
InChI=1S/2Bi.3Te GUYIRKJSQUOSJV-UHFFFAOYSA-N

PROPERTIES Compound Formula Mol. Wt. Appearance Melting Point Boiling Point Density Exact Mass Monoisotopic Mass Charge MSDS
Bi2Te3 800.76 Gray or black solid 585 °C
(1085 °F)
N/A 7.64-7.74 g/cm3 801.674797 807.679471 0 Safety Data Sheet

Telluride IonBismuth Telluride is a narrow gap layered semiconductor with high thermal conductivity. Recent research has confirmed that bismuth telluride may significantly increase the speed of microchips and be the basis for the emerging next generation technology know as "Spintronics". American Elements Bismuth Telluride products are generally available in most volumes and can be purchased in bulk quantites. American Elements can produce most materials in high purity and ultra high purity (up to 99.99999%) forms and follows applicable ASTM testing standards; a range of grades are available including Mil Spec (military grade), ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade, Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade, Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia). We can also produce materials to custom specifications by request, in addition to custom compositions for commercial and research applications and new proprietary technologies. Typical and custom packaging is available, as is additional research, technical and safety (MSDS) data. Please contact us above for information on specifications, lead time and pricing.

Bismuth (Bi) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbol Bismuth (atomic symbol: Bi, atomic number: 83) is a Block P, Group 15, Period 6 element with an atomic radius of 208.98040. The number of electrons in each of Bismuth's shells is 2, 8, 18, 32, 18, 5 and its electron configuration is [Xe] 4f14 5d10 6s2 6p3. Bismuth Bohr ModelThe bismuth atom has a radius of 156 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 207 pm. In its elemental form, bismuth is a silvery white brittle metal. Bismuth is the most diamagnetic of all metals and, with the exception of mercury, its thermal conductivity is lower than any other metal. Elemental Bismuth Bismuth has a high electrical resistance, and has the highest Hall Effect of any metal (i.e., greatest increase in electrical resistance when placed in a magnetic field). Bismuth is found in bismuthinite and bismite It is also produced as a byproduct of lead, copper, tin, molybdenum and tungsten extraction. Bismuth was first discovered by Early Man. The name Bismuth originates from the German word 'wissmuth,' meaning white mass. For more information on bismuth, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of bismuth products, visit the Bismuth element page.

Tellurium Bohr ModelTellurium (Te) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolTellurium (atomic symbol: Te, atomic number: 52) is a Block P, Group 16, Period 5 element with an atomic radius of 127.60. The number of electrons in each of tellurium's shells is 2, 8, 18, 18, 6 and its electron configuration is [Kr] 4d10 5s2 5p4. Tellurium was discovered by Franz Muller von Reichenstein in 1782 and first isolated by Martin Heinrich Klaproth in 1798. In its elemental form, tellurium has a silvery lustrous gray appearance.Elemental Tellurium The tellurium atom has a radius of 140 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 206 pm. Tellurium is most commonly sourced from the anode sludges produced as a byproduct of copper refining. The name Tellurium originates from the Greek word Tellus, meaning Earth. For more information on tellurium, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of tellurium products, visit the Tellurium element page.


HEALTH, SAFETY & TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION
Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS
Signal Word Warning
Hazard Statements H302-H312-H315-H319-H332-H335
Hazard Codes N/A
Risk Codes N/A
Safety Precautions N/A
RTECS Number N/A
Transport Information N/A
WGK Germany 3
Globally Harmonized System of
Classification and Labelling (GHS)
Exclamation Mark-Acute Toxicity        

BISMUTH TELLURIDE SYNONYMS
Dibismuth tritelluride, Bismuth(III) telluride, Bismuth sesquitelluride, Bismuth tritelluride

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PACKAGING SPECIFICATIONS FOR BULK & RESEARCH QUANTITIES
Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.


Have a Question? Ask a Chemical Engineer or Material Scientist
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Recent Research & Development for Bismuth

  • Thermal Decomposition of Bismuth Oxysulfide from Photoelectric Bi2O2S to Superconducting Bi4O4S3. Xian Zhang, Yufeng Liu, Ganghua Zhang, Yingqi Wang, Hui Zhang, and Fuqiang Huang. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: February 3, 2015
  • Electrospun Bismuth Ferrite Nanofibers for Potential Applications in Ferroelectric Photovoltaic Devices. Linfeng Fei, Yongming Hu, Xing Li, Ruobing Song, Li Sun, Haitao Huang, Haoshuang Gu, Helen L. W. Chan, and Yu Wang. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 26, 2015
  • Indirect Bandgap and Optical Properties of Monoclinic Bismuth Vanadate. Jason K. Cooper, Sheraz Gul, Francesca M. Toma, Le Chen, Yi-Sheng Liu, Jinghua Guo, Joel W. Ager, Junko Yano, and Ian D. Sharp. J. Phys. Chem. C: January 15, 2015
  • Reactivity of N,C,N-Chelated Antimony(III) and Bismuth(III) Chlorides with Lithium Reagents: Addition vs Substitution. Iva Vránová, Roman Jambor, Aleš R?ži?ka, Robert Jirásko, and Libor Dostál. Organometallics: January 6, 2015
  • Bismuth Sulfide Nanorods as a Precision Nanomedicine for in Vivo Multimodal Imaging-Guided Photothermal Therapy of Tumor. Jing Liu, Xiaopeng Zheng, Liang Yan, Liangjun Zhou, Gan Tian, Wenyan Yin, Liming Wang, Ying Liu, Zhongbo Hu, Zhanjun Gu, Chunying Chen, and Yuliang Zhao. ACS Nano: January 5, 2015
  • Oxygen Vacancy Induced Bismuth Oxyiodide with Remarkably Increased Visible-Light Absorption and Superior Photocatalytic Performance. Yongchao Huang, Haibo Li, Muhammad-Sadeeq Balogun, Wenyue Liu, Yexiang Tong, Xihong Lu, and Hongbing Ji. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: December 1, 2014
  • Investigation of New Alkali Bismuth OxoSulfates and OxoPhosphates with Original Topologies of Oxo-Centered Units. Minfeng Lü, Marie Colmont, Marielle Huvé, Isabelle De Waele, Christine Terryn, Almaz Aliev, and Olivier Mentré. Inorg. Chem.: October 31, 2014
  • Low-Lying Electronic States in Bismuth Trimer Bi3 As Revealed by Laser-Induced NIR Emission Spectroscopy in Solid Ne. Tomonari Wakabayashi, Yoriko Wada, Kyo Nakajima, Yusuke Morisawa, Susumu Kuma, Yuki Miyamoto, Noboru Sasao, Motohiko Yoshimura, Tohru Sato, and Kentarou Kawaguchi. J. Phys. Chem. A: October 30, 2014
  • Pulsed Laser Deposition of Epitaxial and Polycrystalline Bismuth Vanadate Thin Films. Alexander J. E. Rettie, Shirin Mozaffari, Martin D. McDaniel, Kristen N. Pearson, John G. Ekerdt, John T. Markert, and C. Buddie Mullins. J. Phys. Chem. C: October 29, 2014
  • Gravimetric Analysis of Bismuth in Bismuth Subsalicylate Tablets: A Versatile Quantitative Experiment for Undergraduate Laboratories. Eric Davis, Ken Cheung, Steve Pauls, Jonathan Dick, Elijah Roth, Nicole Zalewski, Christopher Veldhuizen, and Joel Coeler. J. Chem. Educ.: 41935

Recent Research & Development for Tellurides

  • Design of Lead Telluride Based Thermoelectric Materials through Incorporation of Lead Sulfide Inclusions or Ligand Stripping of Nano-Sized Building Blocks. Derak James, Xu Lu, Alexander Chi Nguyen, Donald T. Morelli, and Stephanie L. Brock. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 11, 2015
  • Efficient and Ultrafast Formation of Long-Lived Charge-Transfer Exciton State in Atomically Thin Cadmium Selenide/Cadmium Telluride Type-II Heteronanosheets. Kaifeng Wu, Qiuyang Li, Yanyan Jia, James R. McBride, Zhao-xiong Xie, and Tianquan Lian. ACS Nano: December 30, 2014
  • Quantitative Analysis of Free Fatty Acids in Human Serum Using Biexciton Auger Recombination in Cadmium Telluride Nanoparticles Loaded on Zeolite. Mengrui Yang and Tatsuya Fujino. Anal. Chem.: September 15, 2014
  • Mercury Telluride Colloidal Quantum Dots: Electronic Structure, Size-Dependent Spectra, and Photocurrent Detection up to 12 ?m. Sean E. Keuleyan, Philippe Guyot-Sionnest, Christophe Delerue, and Guy Allan. ACS Nano: August 12, 2014
  • Electron-Deficient Telluride Cs3Cu20Te13 with Sodalite-Type Network: Syntheses, Structures, and Physical Properties. Wen-Juan Huai, Jin-Ni Shen, Hua Lin, Ling Chen, and Li-Ming Wu. Inorg. Chem.: May 13, 2014
  • Thermoelectric Properties of Silver TellurideBismuth Telluride Nanowire Heterostructure Synthesized by Site-Selective Conversion. Haiyu Fang, Haoran Yang, and Yue Wu. Chem. Mater.: May 8, 2014
  • n-Type Carbon Nanotubes/Silver Telluride Nanohybrid Buckypaper with a High-Thermoelectric Figure of Merit. Weiyun Zhao, Hui Teng Tan, Li Ping Tan, Shufen Fan, Huey Hoon Hng, Yin Chiang Freddy Boey, Igor Beloborodov, and Qingyu Yan. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: March 19, 2014
  • Intense Pulsed Light Treatment of Cadmium Telluride Nanoparticle-Based Thin Films. Ruvini Dharmadasa, Brandon Lavery, I. M. Dharmadasa, and Thad Druffel. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: March 17, 2014
  • Generalized One-Pot Synthesis of Copper Sulfide, Selenide-Sulfide, and Telluride-Sulfide Nanoparticles. Pearl L. Saldanha, Rosaria Brescia, Mirko Prato, Hongbo Li, Mauro Povia, Liberato Manna, and Vladimir Lesnyak. Chem. Mater.: January 9, 2014
  • Synthesis of Uniform Disk-Shaped Copper Telluride Nanocrystals and Cation Exchange to Cadmium Telluride Quantum Disks with Stable Red Emission. Hongbo Li, Rosaria Brescia, Mauro Povia, Mirko Prato, Giovanni Bertoni, Liberato Manna, and Iwan Moreels. J. Am. Chem. Soc.: July 18, 2013