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Zinc Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide Quantum Dots

Zn-Cd-Se/ Zn-S


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Zinc Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide Quantum Dot -440 nm ZNCDSEZNS-QD-440 Request Quote
Zinc Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide Quantum Dot -480 nm ZNCDSEZNS-QD-480 Request Quote

American Elements is a manufacturer and supplier specializing in producing Zinc Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide (ZnCdSe/ZnS) Quantum Dots. ZnCdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots are core-shell structured inorganic nanocrystals where an inner core of Cadmium Selenide is encapsulated in an outer core of wider band gap Zinc Selenide. Zinc Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide Quantum Dots exhibit spectra emission ranges from 530 nanometers (nm) to 610 nanometers (nm) wavelengths. They are high luminosity inorganic particles soluble in various organic solutions. Zinc Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide Quantum Dots are nanoparticles of Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide semiconductor crystals with the novel property of having an extremely narrow emission spectrum (Gaussian Distribution) that is directly proportional to the particle's size. The smaller the particle the more its emission is blue shifted and conversely the larger the particle size, the more its emission is red shifted. Zinc Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide Quantum Dots have the potential to turn light emitting diodes (LED) from merely display devises to illumination devices creating the first solid state lighting sources. technical, research and safety (MSDS) information is available as is a Reference Calculator for converting relevant units of measurement. American Elements manufactures quantum dots from several semiconductor materials, including Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Lead Selenide (PbSe), Zinc Indium Phosphide/Zinc Sulfide (ZnInP/ZnS), Indium Phosphide/ Zinc Sulfide (InP/ZnS), and Graphene; for more information about uses and applications for quantum dots, please visit the Quantum Dots information center.

Zinc (Zn) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolZinc (atomic symbol: Zn, atomic number: 30) is a Block D, Group 12, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 65.38. The number of electrons in each of zinc's shells is 2, 8, 18, 2, and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d10 4s2. Zinc Bohr ModelThe zinc atom has a radius of 134 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 210 pm. Zinc was discovered by Indian metallurgists prior to 1000 BC and first recognized as a unique element by Rasaratna Samuccaya in 800. Zinc was first isolated by Andreas Marggraf in 1746.Elemental Zinc In its elemental form, zinc has a silver-gray appearance. It is brittle at ordinary temperatures but malleable at 100 °C to 150 °C. It is a fair conductor of electricity, and burns in air at high red producing white clouds of the oxide. Zinc is mined from sulfidic ore deposits. It is the 24th most abundant element in the earth's crust and the fourth most common metal in use (after iron, aluminum, and copper). The name zinc originates from the German word "zin," meaning tin. For more information on zinc, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of zinc products, visit the Zinc element page.

Cadmium (Cd) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolCadmium (atomic symbol: Cd, atomic number: 48) is a Block D, Group 12, Period 5 element with an atomic weight of 112.411. Cadmium Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of Cadmium's shells is 2, 8, 18, 18, 2 and its electron configuration is [Kr] 4d10 5s2. The cadmium atom has a radius of 151 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 230 pm.Cadmium was discovered and first isolated by Karl Samuel Leberecht Hermann and Friedrich Stromeyer in 1817. In its elemental form, cadmium has a silvery bluish gray metallic appearance. Cadmium makes up about 0.1 ppm of the earth's crust. Elemental CadmiumNo significant deposits of cadmium containing ores are known, however, it is sometimes found in its metallic form. It is a common impurity in zinc ores and is isolated during the production of zinc. Cadmium is a key component in battery production and particular pigments and coatings due to its distinct yellow color. Cadmium oxide is used in phosphors for television picture tubes. The name Cadmium originates from the Latin word 'cadmia' and the Greek word 'kadmeia'. For more information on cadmium, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of cadmium products, visit the Cadmium element page.

Selenium Bohr ModelSelenide(Se) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolSelenium (atomic symbol: Se, atomic number: 34) is a Block P, Group 16, Period 4 element with an atomic radius of 78.96. The number of electrons in each of Selenium's shells is 2, 8, 18, 6 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d10 4s2 4p4. The selenium atom has a radius of 120 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 190 pm. Selenium is a non-metal with several allotropes: a black, vitreous form with an irregular crystal structure; three red-colored forms with monoclinic crystal structures; and a gray form with a hexagonal crystal structure, the most stable and dense form of the element. Elemental Selenium One of the mose common uses for selenium is in glass production; the red tint that it lends to glass neutralizes green or yellow tints from impurities in the glass materials. Selenium was discovered and first isolated by Jöns Jakob Berzelius and Johann Gottlieb Gahn in 1817. The origin of the name Selenium comes from the Greek word "Selênê," meaning moon. For more information on selenium, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of selenium products, visit the Selenium element page.

Sulfur Bohr ModelSulfur (S) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolSulfur or Sulphur (atomic symbol: S, atomic number: 16) is a Block P, Group 16, Period 3 element with an atomic radius of 32.066. The number of electrons in each of Sulfur's shells is 2, 8, 6 and its electron configuration is [Ne] 3s2 3p4. In its elemental form, sulfur has a light yellow appearance. The sulfur atom has a covalent radius of 105 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 180 pm. In nature, sulfur can be found in hot springs, meteorites, volcanoes, and as galena, gypsum, and epsom salts. Sulfur has been known since ancient times but was not accepted as an element until 1777, when Antoine Lavoisier helped to convince the scientific community that it was an element and not a compound. For more information on sulfur, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of sulfur products, visit the Sulfur element page.


CUSTOMERS FOR ZINC CADMIUM SELENIDE/ ZINC SULFIDE QUANTUM DOTS HAVE ALSO LOOKED AT
Zinc Bars ZnCdSe Zinc Foil Tin Bismuth Zinc Alloy Zinc Nanoparticles
Zinc Nitrate Zinc Acetylacetonate Zinc Oxide Sputtering Target Zinc Powder Zinc Acetate
Zinc Oxide Nanopowder Zinc Metal Zinc Pellets Zinc Oxide Pellets Zinc Chloride
Show Me MORE Forms of Zinc

PACKAGING SPECIFICATIONS FOR BULK & RESEARCH QUANTITIES
Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.


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Recent Research & Development for Zinc

  • Structural Correlations between Luminescent Properties and Excited State Internal Proton Transfer in some Zinc(II) N,N’-bis(Salicylidenes). Cristina Aparecida Barboza, José Carlos Germino, Anderson Martinez Santana, Fernando Júnior Quites, Pedro Antônio Muniz Vazquez, and Teresa Dib Zambon Atvars. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 16, 2015
  • Enhancement of the Yield of Photoinduced Charge Separation in Zinc Porphyrin-Quantum Dot Complexes by a bis-Dithiocarbamate Linkage. Shengye Jin, Mario Tagliazucchi, Ho-Jin Son, Rachel Harris, Kenneth Aruda, David J. Weinberg, Alexander B Nepomnyashchii, Omar K. Farha, Joseph T. Hupp, and Emily A. Weiss. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 12, 2015
  • Macrocyclic Platforms for the Construction of Tetranuclear Oxo and Hydroxo Zinc Clusters. Thomas Cadenbach, James R. Pankhurst, Tommy A. Hofmann, Massimiliano Curcio, Polly L. Arnold, and Jason B. Love. Organometallics: February 10, 2015
  • New insight into mercury emissions from zinc smelters using mass flow analysis. Qingru Wu, Shuxiao Wang, Mulin Hui, Fengyang Wang, Lei Zhang, Lei Duan, and Yao Luo. Environ. Sci. Technol.: February 8, 2015
  • Nitrogen-Rich Salts Based on the Energetic [Monoaquabis(N,N-bis(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)amine)-zinc(II)] Anion: A Promising Design in the Development of New Energetic Materials. Fugang Li, Yangang Bi, Wenyuan Zhao, Tonglai Zhang, Zunning Zhou, and Li Yang. Inorg. Chem.: February 5, 2015
  • Tailoring Native Defects and Zinc Impurities in Li4Ti5O12: Insights from First-Principles Study. Huan Duan, Jia Li, Hongda Du, Sum Wai Chiang, Chengjun Xu, Wenhui Duan, and Feiyu Kang. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 5, 2015
  • Aggregation-Induced Structure Transition of Protein-Stabilized Zinc Copper Nanoclusters for Amplified Chemiluminescence. Hui Chen, Ling Lin, Haifang Li, Jianzhang Li, and Jin-Ming Lin. ACS Nano: February 3, 2015
  • Zinc oxide supported trans-CoD(p-Cl)PPCl type Metalloporphyrins catalyst for cyclohexane oxidation to cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone with high yield. Yujia Xie, Fengyong Zhang, Pingle Liu, Fang Hao, and Hean Luo. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.: February 2, 2015
  • Additive Effects in the Formation of Fluorescent Zinc Metal–Organic Frameworks with 5-Hydroxyisophthalate. Matthew D. Hill, Samir El-Hankari, Mauro Chiacchia, Graham J. Tizzard, Simon J. Coles, Darren Bradshaw, Jonathan A. Kitchen, and Tony D. Keene. Crystal Growth & Design: January 29, 2015
  • Classification of Zinc Sulfide Quantum Dots by Size: Insights into the Particle Surface–Solvent Interaction of Colloids. Doris Segets, Christian Lutz, Kyoko Yamamoto, So Komada, Sebastian Süß, Yasushige Mori, and Wolfgang Peukert. J. Phys. Chem. C: January 29, 2015

Recent Research & Development for Cadmium

  • Controlling the Trap State Landscape of Colloidal CdSe Nanocrystals with Cadmium Halide Ligands. Matthew J. Greaney, Elsa Couderc, Jing Zhao, Benjamin A. Nail, Matthew Mecklenburg, William Thornbury, Frank E. Osterloh, Stephen E. Bradforth, and Richard L. Brutchey. Chem. Mater.: January 12, 2015
  • Microarray-Based Analysis of Gene Expression in Lycopersicon esculentum Seedling Roots in Response to Cadmium, Chromium, Mercury, and Lead. Jing Hou, Xinhui Liu, Juan Wang, Shengnan Zhao, and Baoshan Cui. Environ. Sci. Technol.: January 6, 2015
  • Efficient and Ultrafast Formation of Long-Lived Charge-Transfer Exciton State in Atomically Thin Cadmium Selenide/Cadmium Telluride Type-II Heteronanosheets. Kaifeng Wu, Qiuyang Li, Yanyan Jia, James R. McBride, Zhao-xiong Xie, and Tianquan Lian. ACS Nano: December 30, 2014
  • Bioaccumulation Kinetics and Organ Distribution of Cadmium and Zinc in the Freshwater Decapod Crustacean Macrobrachium australiense. Tom Cresswell, Stuart L. Simpson, Debashish Mazumder, Paul D. Callaghan, and An P. Nguyen. Environ. Sci. Technol.: December 24, 2014
  • Single Drop Solution Electrode Glow Discharge for Plasma Assisted-Chemical Vapor Generation: Sensitive Detection of Zinc and Cadmium in Limited Amounts of Samples. Zhi-ang Li, Qing Tan, Xiandeng Hou, Kailai Xu, and Chengbin Zheng. Anal. Chem.: November 19, 2014
  • Biosorption of Cadmium by Waste Shell Dust of Fresh Water Mussel Lamellidens marginalis: Implications for Metal Bioremediation. Asif Hossain, Satya Ranjan Bhattacharyya, and Gautam Aditya. ACS Sustainable Chem. Eng.: November 17, 2014
  • Tailoring the Exciton Fine Structure of Cadmium Selenide Nanocrystals with Shape Anisotropy and Magnetic Field. Chiara Sinito, Mark J. Fernée, Serguei V. Goupalov, Paul Mulvaney, Philippe Tamarat, and Brahim Lounis. ACS Nano: October 20, 2014
  • Evidence of Common Cadmium and Copper Uptake Routes in Zebrafish Danio rerio. I. Komjarova and N.R. Bury. Environ. Sci. Technol.: October 7, 2014
  • Ratiometric Electrochemical Sensor for Selective Monitoring of Cadmium Ions Using Biomolecular Recognition. Xiaolan Chai, Limin Zhang, and Yang Tian. Anal. Chem.: October 1, 2014
  • Uptake and Subcellular Distributions of Cadmium and Selenium in Transplanted Aquatic Insect Larvae. Maikel Rosabal, Dominic E. Ponton, Peter G. C. Campbell, and Landis Hare. Environ. Sci. Technol.: September 30, 2014

Recent Research & Development for Selenides

  • Lifetime, Mobility, and Diffusion of Photoexcited Carriers in Ligand-Exchanged Lead Selenide Nanocrystal Films Measured by Time-Resolved Terahertz Spectroscopy. Glenn W. Guglietta, Benjamin T. Diroll, E. Ashley Gaulding, Julia L. Fordham, Siming Li, Christopher B. Murray, and Jason B. Baxter. ACS Nano: February 2, 2015
  • Soft Chemical Control of Superconductivity in Lithium Iron Selenide Hydroxides Li1–xFex(OH)Fe1–ySe. Hualei Sun, Daniel N. Woodruff, Simon J. Cassidy, Genevieve M. Allcroft, Stefan J. Sedlmaier, Amber L. Thompson, Paul A. Bingham, Susan D. Forder, Simon Cartenet, Nicolas Mary, Silvia Ramos, Francesca R. Foronda, Benjamin H. Williams, Xiaodong Li, Stephen J. Blundell, and Simon J. Clarke. Inorg. Chem.: January 23, 2015
  • Efficient and Ultrafast Formation of Long-Lived Charge-Transfer Exciton State in Atomically Thin Cadmium Selenide/Cadmium Telluride Type-II Heteronanosheets. Kaifeng Wu, Qiuyang Li, Yanyan Jia, James R. McBride, Zhao-xiong Xie, and Tianquan Lian. ACS Nano: December 30, 2014
  • Tailoring the Exciton Fine Structure of Cadmium Selenide Nanocrystals with Shape Anisotropy and Magnetic Field. Chiara Sinito, Mark J. Fernée, Serguei V. Goupalov, Paul Mulvaney, Philippe Tamarat, and Brahim Lounis. ACS Nano: October 20, 2014
  • Thin-Film Copper Indium Gallium Selenide Solar Cell Based on Low-Temperature All-Printing Process. Manjeet Singh, Jinting Jiu, Tohru Sugahara, and Katsuaki Suganuma. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: September 2, 2014
  • Germanium and Tin Selenide Nanocrystals for High-Capacity Lithium Ion Batteries: Comparative Phase Conversion of Germanium and Tin. Hyung Soon Im, Young Rok Lim, Yong Jae Cho, Jeunghee Park, Eun Hee Cha, and Hong Seok Kang. J. Phys. Chem. C: September 1, 2014
  • Dynamic Observation of Phase Transformation Behaviors in Indium(III) Selenide Nanowire Based Phase Change Memory. Yu-Ting Huang, Chun-Wei Huang, Jui-Yuan Chen, Yi-Hsin Ting, Kuo-Chang Lu, Yu-Lun Chueh, and Wen-Wei Wu. ACS Nano: August 18, 2014
  • Electrical Transport and Grain Growth in Solution-Cast, Chloride-Terminated Cadmium Selenide Nanocrystal Thin Films. Zachariah M. Norman, Nicholas C. Anderson, and Jonathan S. Owen. ACS Nano: June 24, 2014
  • Fluorescence Enhancement of Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots Assembled on Silver Nanoparticles and Its Application to Glucose Detection. Yecang Tang, Qian Yang, Ting Wu, Li Liu, Yi Ding, and Bo Yu. Langmuir: May 19, 2014
  • Wide Range Photodetector Based on Catalyst Free Grown Indium Selenide Microwires. Zulfiqar Ali, Misbah Mirza, Chuanbao Cao, Faheem K. Butt, M. Tanveer, Muhammad Tahir, Imran Aslam, Faryal Idrees, and Muhammad Safdar. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: May 17, 2014

Recent Research & Development for Sulfides

  • Intermolecular Interaction in the Formaldehyde – Dimethyl Ether and Formaldehyde – Dimethyl Sulfide Complexes Investigated by Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy and Ab Initio Calculations. Yoshio Tatamitani, Yoshiyuki Kawashima, Yoshihiro Osamura, and Eizi Hirota. J. Phys. Chem. A: February 13, 2015
  • Pyridine-Biquinoline-Metal Complexes for Sensing Pyrophosphate and Hydrogen Sulfide in Aqueous Buffer and in Cells. Zijuan Hai, Yajie Bao, Qingqing Miao, Xiaoyi Yi, and Gaolin Liang. Anal. Chem.: February 12, 2015
  • Design of Lead Telluride Based Thermoelectric Materials through Incorporation of Lead Sulfide Inclusions or Ligand Stripping of Nano-Sized Building Blocks. Derak James, Xu Lu, Alexander Chi Nguyen, Donald T. Morelli, and Stephanie L. Brock. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 11, 2015
  • Reduction of Nitroaromatics Sorbed to Black Carbon by Direct Reaction with Sorbed Sulfides. Wenqing Xu, Joseph J. Pignatello, and William Armistead Mitch. Environ. Sci. Technol.: February 11, 2015
  • Classification of Zinc Sulfide Quantum Dots by Size: Insights into the Particle Surface–Solvent Interaction of Colloids. Doris Segets, Christian Lutz, Kyoko Yamamoto, So Komada, Sebastian Süß, Yasushige Mori, and Wolfgang Peukert. J. Phys. Chem. C: January 29, 2015
  • Double Metal Ions Synergistic Effect in Hierarchical Multiple Sulfide Microflowers for Enhanced Supercapacitor Performance. Yang Gao, Liwei Mi, Wutao Wei, Shizhong Cui, Zhi Zheng, Hongwei Hou, and Weihua Chen. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 27, 2015
  • Reductive Transformation of Tetrachloroethene Catalyzed by Sulfide–Cobalamin in Nano-Mackinawite Suspension. Daeseung Kyung, Amnorzahira Amir, Kyunghoon Choi, and Woojin Lee. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.: January 26, 2015
  • Molecularly Engineered Quantum Dots for Visualization of Hydrogen Sulfide. Yehan Yan, Huan Yu, Yajiao Zhang, Kui Zhang, Houjuan Zhu, Tao Yu, Hui Jiang, and Suhua Wang. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 23, 2015
  • Plasmonic Copper Sulfide Nanocrystals Exhibiting Near-Infrared Photothermal and Photodynamic Therapeutic Effects. Shunhao Wang, Andreas Riedinger, Hongbo Li, Changhui Fu, Huiyu Liu, Linlin Li, Tianlong Liu, Longfei Tan, Markus J. Barthel, Giammarino Pugliese, Francesco De Donato, Marco Scotto D’Abbusco, Xianwei Meng, Liberato Manna, Huan Meng, and Teresa Pellegrino. ACS Nano: January 20, 2015
  • Photoinduced Carrier Dynamics of Nearly Stoichiometric Oleylamine-Protected Copper Indium Sulfide Nanoparticles and Nanodisks. Masanori Sakamoto, Lihui Chen, Makoto Okano, David M. Tex, Yoshihiko Kanemitsu, and Toshiharu Teranishi. J. Phys. Chem. C: January 19, 2015