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Zinc Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide Quantum Dots

Zn-Cd-Se/ Zn-S


Product Product Code Order or Specifications
Zinc Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide Quantum Dot -440 nm ZNCDSEZNS-QD-440 Contact American Elements
Zinc Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide Quantum Dot -480 nm ZNCDSEZNS-QD-480 Contact American Elements

American Elements is a manufacturer and supplier specializing in producing Zinc Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide (ZnCdSe/ZnS) Quantum Dots. ZnCdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots are core-shell structured inorganic nanocrystals where an inner core of Cadmium Selenide is encapsulated in an outer core of wider band gap Zinc Selenide. Zinc Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide Quantum Dots exhibit spectra emission ranges from 530 nanometers (nm) to 610 nanometers (nm) wavelengths. They are high luminosity inorganic particles soluble in various organic solutions. Zinc Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide Quantum Dots are nanoparticles of Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide semiconductor crystals with the novel property of having an extremely narrow emission spectrum (Gaussian Distribution) that is directly proportional to the particle's size. The smaller the particle the more its emission is blue shifted and conversely the larger the particle size, the more its emission is red shifted. Zinc Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide Quantum Dots have the potential to turn light emitting diodes (LED) from merely display devises to illumination devices creating the first solid state lighting sources. technical, research and safety (MSDS) information is available as is a Reference Calculator for converting relevant units of measurement. American Elements manufactures quantum dots from several semiconductor materials, including Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Lead Selenide (PbSe), Zinc Indium Phosphide/Zinc Sulfide (ZnInP/ZnS), Indium Phosphide/ Zinc Sulfide (InP/ZnS), and Graphene; for more information about uses and applications for quantum dots, please visit the Quantum Dots information center.

Zinc(Zn) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolZinc (atomic symbol: Zn, atomic number: 30) is a Block D, Group 12, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 65.38. The number of electrons in each of zinc's shells is 2, 8, 18, 2, and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d10 4s2. Zinc Bohr ModelThe zinc atom has a radius of 134 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 210 pm. Zinc was discovered by Indian metallurgists prior to 1000 BC and first recognized as a unique element by Rasaratna Samuccaya in 800. Zinc was first isolated by Andreas Marggraf in 1746.Elemental Zinc In its elemental form, zinc has a silver-gray appearance. It is brittle at ordinary temperatures but malleable at 100 °C to 150 °C. It is a fair conductor of electricity, and burns in air at high red producing white clouds of the oxide. Zinc is mined from sulfidic ore deposits. It is the 24th most abundant element in the earth's crust and the fourth most common metal in use (after iron, aluminum, and copper). The name zinc originates from the German word "zin," meaning tin. For more information on zinc, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of zinc products, visit the Zinc Information Center.

Cadmium (Cd) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolCadmium (atomic symbol: Cd, atomic number: 48) is a Block D, Group 12, Period 5 element with an atomic weight of 112.411. Cadmium Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of Cadmium's shells is 2, 8, 18, 18, 2 and its electron configuration is [Kr] 4d10 5s2. The cadmium atom has a radius of 151 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 230 pm.Cadmium was discovered and first isolated by Karl Samuel Leberecht Hermann and Friedrich Stromeyer in 1817. In its elemental form, cadmium has a silvery bluish gray metallic appearance. Cadmium makes up about 0.1 ppm of the earth's crust. Elemental CadmiumNo significant deposits of cadmium containing ores are known, however, it is sometimes found in its metallic form. It is a common impurity in zinc ores and is isolated during the production of zinc. Cadmium is a key component in battery production and particular pigments and coatings due to its distinct yellow color. Cadmium oxide is used in phosphors for television picture tubes. The name Cadmium originates from the Latin word 'cadmia' and the Greek word 'kadmeia'. For more information on cadmium, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of cadmium products, visit the Cadmium Information Center.

Selenium Bohr ModelSelenide(Se) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolSelenium (atomic symbol: Se, atomic number: 34) is a Block P, Group 16, Period 4 element with an atomic radius of 78.96. The number of electrons in each of Selenium's shells is 2, 8, 18, 6 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d10 4s2 4p4. The selenium atom has a radius of 120 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 190 pm. Selenium is a non-metal with several allotropes: a black, vitreous form with an irregular crystal structure; three red-colored forms with monoclinic crystal structures; and a gray form with a hexagonal crystal structure, the most stable and dense form of the element. Elemental Selenium One of the mose common uses for selenium is in glass production; the red tint that it lends to glass neutralizes green or yellow tints from impurities in the glass materials. Selenium was discovered and first isolated by Jöns Jakob Berzelius and Johann Gottlieb Gahn in 1817. The origin of the name Selenium comes from the Greek word "Selênê," meaning moon. For more information on selenium, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of selenium products, visit the Selenium Information Center.

Sulfur Bohr ModelSulfur (S) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolSulfur or Sulphur (atomic symbol: S, atomic number: 16) is a Block P, Group 16, Period 3 element with an atomic radius of 32.066. The number of electrons in each of Sulfur's shells is 2, 8, 6 and its electron configuration is [Ne]3s2 3p4. In its elemental form, sulfur has a light yellow appearance. The sulfur atom has a covalent radius of 105 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 180 pm. In nature, sulfur can be found in hot springs, meteorites, volcanoes, and as galena, gypsum, and epsom salts. Sulfur has been known since ancient times but was not accepted as an element until 1777 when Antoine Lavoisier helped to convince the scientific community that it was an element and not a compound. For more information on sulfur, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of sulfur products, visit the Sulfur Information Center.


CUSTOMERS FOR ZINC CADMIUM SELENIDE/ ZINC SULFIDE QUANTUM DOTS HAVE ALSO LOOKED AT
Zinc Bars Zn Cd Se Zinc Foil Tin Bismuth Zinc Alloy Zinc Nanoparticles
Zinc Nitrate Zinc Acetylacetonate Zinc Oxide Sputtering Target Zinc Powder Zinc Acetate
Zinc Oxide Zinc Metal Zinc Pellets Zinc Oxide Pellets Zinc Chloride
Show Me MORE Forms of Zinc

PACKAGING SPECIFICATIONS FOR BULK & RESEARCH QUANTITIES
Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.


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Recent Research & Development for Zinc


Recent Research & Development for Cadmium


Recent Research & Development for Selenides


Recent Research & Development for Sulfides