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Titanium Chromium Sputtering Target

High Purity Ti-Cr Sputtering Target


Product Product Code Request Quote
(2N) 99% Titanium Chromium Sputtering Target TI-CR-02-ST Request Quote
(2N5) 99.5% Titanium Chromium Sputtering Target TI-CR-025-ST Request Quote
(3N) 99.9% Titanium Chromium Sputtering Target TI-CR-03-ST Request Quote
(3N5) 99.95% Titanium Chromium Sputtering Target TI-CR-035-ST Request Quote
(4N) 99.99% Titanium Chromium Sputtering Target TI-CR-04-ST Request Quote
(5N) 99.999% Titanium Chromium Sputtering Target TI-CR-05-ST Request Quote

American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopeia/British Pharmacopeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards.See safety data and research below and pricing/lead time above. American Elements specializes in producing high purity Titanium Chromium Sputtering Targets with the highest possible density High Purity (99.99%) Metallic Sputtering Targetand smallest possible average grain sizes for use in semiconductor, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) display and optical applications. Our standard Sputtering Targets for thin film are available monoblock or bonded with dimensions and configurations up to 820 mm with hole drill locations and threading, beveling, grooves and backing designed to work with both older sputtering devices as well as the latest process equipment, such as large area coating for solar energy or fuel cells and flip-chip applications. Research sized targets are also produced as well as custom sizes and alloys. All targets are analyzed using best demonstrated techniques including X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry (GDMS), and Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP). "Sputtering" allows for thin film deposition of an ultra high purity sputtering metallic or oxide material onto another solid substrate by the controlled removal and conversion of the target material into a directed gaseous/plasma phase through ionic bombardment. We can also provide targets outside this range in addition to just about any size rectangular, annular, or oval target. Materials are produced using crystallization, solid state and other ultra high purification processes such as sublimation. American Elements specializes in producing custom compositions for commercial and research applications and for new proprietary technologies. American Elements also casts any of the rare earth metals and most other advanced materials into rod, bar, or plate form, as well as other machined shapes and through other processes nanoparticles. We also produce Titanium as rods, powder and plates. Other shapes are available by request.

Titanium (Ti) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolTitanium (atomic symbol: Ti, atomic number: 22) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 47.867. The number of electrons in each of Titanium's shells is [2, 8, 10, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d2 4s2. Titanium Bohr ModelThe titanium atom has a radius of 147 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 187 pm. Titanium was discovered by William Gregor in 1791 and first isolated by Jöns Jakob Berzelius in 1825. In its elemental form, titanium has a silvery grey-white metallic appearance. Titanium's properties are chemically and physically similar to zirconium, both of which have the same number of valence electrons and are in the same group in the periodic table.Elemental Titanium Titanium has five naturally occurring isotopes: 46Ti through 50Ti, with 48Ti being the most abundant (73.8%). Titanium is found in igneous rocks and the sediments derived from them. It is named after the word Titanos, which is Greek for Titans. For more information on titanium, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of titanium products, visit the Titanium element page.

Chromium (Cr) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolChromium (atomic symbol: Cr, atomic number: 24) is a Block D, Group 6, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 51.9961. Chromium Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of Chromium's shells is 2, 8, 13, 1 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d5 4s1. Chromium was first discovered by Louis Nicolas Vauquelin in 1797. It was first isolated in 1798, also by Louis Nicolas Vauquelin. The chromium atom has a radius of 128 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 189 pm. In its elemental form, chromium has a lustrous steel-gray appearance. Elemental ChromiumChromium is the hardest metal element in the periodic table and the only element that exhibits antiferromagnetic ordering at room temperature, above which it tranforms into a paramagnetic solid. The most common source of chromium is chromite ore (FeCr2O4). Due to its various colorful compounds, Chromium was named after the Greek word 'chroma' meaning color. For more information on chromium, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of chromium products, visit the Chromium element page.


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PACKAGING SPECIFICATIONS FOR BULK & RESEARCH QUANTITIES
Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.


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Recent Research & Development for Titanium

  • Bottom-up synthesis of titanate nanosheets and their morphology change by the addition of organic ligands and dialysis. Takayuki Ban, Takuya Nakagawa, and Yutaka Ohya. Crystal Growth & Design: February 16, 2015
  • Effect of the Duration of UV Irradiation on the Anticoagulant Properties of Titanium Dioxide Films. Jiang Chen, Ping Yang, Yuzhen Liao, Jinbiao Wang, Huiqing Chen, Hong Sun, and Nan Huang. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: February 13, 2015
  • Macroporous Titanate Nanotube/TiO2 Monolith for Fast and Large-Capacity Cation Exchange. Kenji Okada, Genki Asakura, Yasuaki Tokudome, Atsushi Nakahira, and Masahide Takahashi. Chem. Mater.: February 9, 2015
  • Titanium-defected undoped anatase TiO2 with p-type conductivity, room-temperature ferromagnetism and remarkable photocatalytic performance. Songbo Wang, Lun Pan, Jia-Jia Song, Wenbo Mi, Ji-Jun Zou, Li Wang, and Xiangwen Zhang. J. Am. Chem. Soc.: February 6, 2015
  • Synergistic Effect of Titanate-Anatase Heterostructure and Hydrogenation-Induced Surface Disorder on Photocatalytic Water Splitting. Jinmeng Cai, Yingming Zhu, Dongsheng Liu, Ming Meng, Zhenpeng Hu, and Zheng Jiang. ACS Catal.: February 6, 2015
  • Nitrogen Doped 3D Titanium Dioxide Nanorods Architecture with Significantly Enhanced Visible Light Photoactivity. Zhaodong Li, Fei Wang, Alexander Kvit, and Xudong Wang. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 3, 2015
  • Visible Light Mediated Cyclization of Tertiary Anilines with Maleimides Using Nickel(II) Oxide Surface-Modified Titanium Dioxide Catalyst. Jian Tang, Günter Grampp, Yun Liu, Bing-Xiang Wang, Fei-Fei Tao, Li-Jun Wang, Xue-Zheng Liang, Hui-Quan Xiao, and Yong-Miao Shen. J. Org. Chem.: February 2, 2015
  • Modulation of Pore Sizes of Titanium Dioxide Photocatalysts by a Facile Template Free Hydrothermal Synthesis Method: Implications for Photocatalytic Degradation of Rhodamine B. Shivatharsiny Rasalingam, Chia-Ming Wu, and Ranjit T. Koodali. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 29, 2015
  • The Electrorheological Behavior of Suspensions Based on Molten-Salt Synthesized Lithium Titanate Nanoparticles and Their Core–Shell Titanate/Urea Analogues. T. Plachy, M. Mrlik, Z. Kozakova, P. Suly, M. Sedlacik, V. Pavlinek, and I. Kuritka. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 29, 2015
  • Pulsed Laser-Assisted Focused Electron-Beam-Induced Etching of Titanium with XeF2: Enhanced Reaction Rate and Precursor Transport. J. H. Noh, J. D. Fowlkes, R. Timilsina, M. G. Stanford, B. B. Lewis, and P. D. Rack. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 28, 2015

Recent Research & Development for Chromium

  • Synthesis and Catalytic Hydrogenation Reactivity of a Chromium Catecholate Porous Organic Polymer. Jeffrey Camacho-Bunquin, Nathan A. Siladke, Guanghui Zhang, Jens Niklas, Oleg G. Poluektov, SonBinh T. Nguyen, Jeffrey T. Miller, and Adam S. Hock. Organometallics: February 16, 2015
  • Thin Films of Molybdenum Disulfide Doped with Chromium by Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (AACVD). David J. Lewis, Aleksander A. Tedstone, Xiang Li Zhong, Edward A. Lewis, Aidan Rooney, Nicky Savjani, Jack R. Brent, Sarah J. Haigh, M. Grace Burke, Christopher A. Muryn, James M. Raftery, Chris Warrens, Kevin West, Sander Gaemers, and Paul O’Brien. Chem. Mater.: January 31, 2015
  • Combined Effect of Sunflower Stem Carbon–Calcium Alginate Beads for the Removal and Recovery of Chromium from Contaminated Water in Column Mode. Monika Jain, V.K. Garg, Krishna Kadirvelu, and Mika Sillanpää. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.: January 14, 2015
  • Preparation of Mesoporous Chromium Promoted Magnetite Based Catalysts for High Temperature Water Gas Shift Reaction. Fereshteh Meshkani , Mehran Rezaei. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.: January 14, 2015
  • Microarray-Based Analysis of Gene Expression in Lycopersicon esculentum Seedling Roots in Response to Cadmium, Chromium, Mercury, and Lead. Jing Hou, Xinhui Liu, Juan Wang, Shengnan Zhao, and Baoshan Cui. Environ. Sci. Technol.: January 6, 2015
  • Two-Dimensional Titanium Carbide for Efficiently Reductive Removal of Highly Toxic Chromium(VI) from Water. Yulong Ying, Yu Liu, Xinyu Wang, Yiyin Mao, Wei Cao, Pan Hu, and Xinsheng Peng. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 5, 2015
  • Temperature Dependent EXAFS Study of Chromium-Doped GaFeO3 at Gallium and Iron Edges. S. Basu, Ripandeep Singh, A. Das, T. Roy, A. Chakrabarti, A. K. Nigam, S. N. Jha, and D. Bhattacharyya. J. Phys. Chem. C: December 24, 2014
  • Formation of an Endoperoxide upon Chromium-Catalyzed Allylic Oxidation of a Triterpene by Oxygen. Abbie Chung, Matthew R. Miner, Kathleen J. Richert, Curtis J. Rieder, and K. A. Woerpel. J. Org. Chem.: November 13, 2014
  • From Chromium–ChromiumQuintuple Bonds to Molecular Squares and Porous Coordination Polymers. Awal Noor, Emmanuel Sobgwi Tamne, Benjamin Oelkers, Tobias Bauer, Serhiy Demeshko, Franc Meyer, Frank W. Heinemann, and Rhett Kempe. Inorg. Chem.: November 10, 2014
  • Chemical Bonding in a Linear Chromium Metal String Complex. Lai-Chin Wu, Maja K. Thomsen, Solveig R. Madsen, Mette Schmoekel, Mads R. V. Jørgensen, Ming-Chuan Cheng, Shie-Ming Peng, Yu-Sheng Chen, Jacob Overgaard, and Bo B. Iversen. Inorg. Chem.: November 10, 2014