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Yttria Stabilized Zirconia Nanopowder

Y2O3 • ZrO2


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Yttria Stabilized Zirconia Nanopowder ZRO-Y08-01-NP Request Quote

High Purity, D50 = +10 nanometer (nm) by SEMYttria stabilized Zirconia or Zirconium Oxide Nanopowder or Nanoparticles (YSZ), nanodots or nanocrystals are white high surface area particles available fully stabilized (8 mol%) or partially stabilized ( 3 mol%) or doped with yttria (yttrium oxide). Nanoscale Yttria stabilized Zirconia or Zirconium Oxide is typically 5 - 100 nanometers (nm) with specific surface area (SSA) in the 25 - 50 m 2 /g range. Nano Yttria stabilized Zirconia or Zirconium Oxide Particles are also available in Ultra high purity and high purity and coated and dispersed forms. They are also available as a nanofluid through the AE Nanofluid production group. Nanofluids are generally defined as suspended nanoparticles in solution either using surfactant or surface charge technology. Nanofluid dispersion and coating selection technical guidance is also available. Other nanostructures include nanorods, nanowhiskers, nanohorns, nanopyramids and other nanocomposites. Surface functionalized nanoparticles allow for the particles to be preferentially adsorbed at the surface interface using chemically bound polymers. Development research is underway in Nano Electronics and Photonics materials, such as MEMS and NEMS, Bio Nano Materials, such as Biomarkers, Bio Diagnostics & Bio Sensors, and Related Nano Materials, for use in Polymers, Textiles, Fuel Cell Layers, Composites and Solar Energy materials. Nanopowders are analyzed for chemical composition by ICP, particle size distribution (PSD) by laser diffraction, and for Specific Surface Area (SSA) by BET multi-point correlation techniques. Novel nanotechnology applications also include Quantum Dots. High surface areas can also be achieved using solutions and using thin film by sputtering targets and evaporation technology using pellets, rod and foil.. Applications for Yttria stabilized Zirconia or Zirconium Oxide nanocrystals include as in micro-ceramics, in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrolyte microlayers or films, and in coatings, thermal coatings, plastics, nanowire, nanofiber and textiles and in certain advanced ceramic applications. Yttria stabilized Zirconia or Zirconium Oxide Nano Particles are generally immediately available in most volumes. American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards. Typical and custom packaging is available. Additional technical, research and safety (MSDS) information is available as is a Reference Calculator for converting relevant units of measurement.

Yttrium Bohr ModelYttrium (Y) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolYttrium (atomic symbol: Y, atomic number: 39) is a Block D, Group 3, Period 5 element with an atomic weight of 88.90585. The number of electrons in each of yttrium's shells is [2, 8, 18, 9, 2] and its electron configuration is [Kr] 4d1 5s2. The yttrium atom has a radius of 180 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 219 pm. Yttrium was discovered by Johann Gadolin in 1794 and first isolated by Carl Gustav Mosander in 1840. Elemental Yttrium In its elemental form, Yttrium has a silvery white metallic appearance. Yttrium has the highest thermodynamic affinity for oxygen of any element. Yttrium is not found in nature as a free element and is almost always found combined with the lanthanides in rare earth minerals. While not part of the rare earth series, it resembles the heavy rare earths which are sometimes referred to as the "yttrics" for this reason. Another unique characteristic derives from its ability to form crystals with useful properties. The name yttrium originated from a Swedish village near Vaxholm called Yttbery where it was discovered. For more information on yttrium, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of yttrium products, visit the Yttrium element page.

Zirconium (Zr) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbol Zirconium (atomic symbol: Zr, atomic number: 40) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 5 element with an atomic weight of 91.224. Zirconium Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of Zirconium's shells is 2, 8, 18, 10, 2 and its electron configuration is [Kr] 4d2 5s2. The zirconium atom has a radius of 160 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 186 pm. Zirconium was discovered by Martin Heinrich Klaproth in 1789 and first isolated by Jöns Jakob Berzelius in 1824. Elemental ZirconiumIn its elemental form, zirconium has a silvery white appearance that is similar to titanium. Zirconium's principal mineral is zircon (zirconium silicate). Zirconium is commercially produced as a byproduct of titanium and tin mining and has many applications as a opacifier and a refractory material. It is not found in nature as a free element. The name of zirconium comes from the mineral zircon, the most important source of zirconium, and from the Persian wordzargun, meaning gold-like. For more information on zirconium, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of zirconium products, visit the Zirconium element page.


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PACKAGING SPECIFICATIONS FOR BULK & RESEARCH QUANTITIES
Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.


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Recent Research & Development for Yttrium

  • Introduction of an yttrium-manganese binary composite that has extremely high adsorption capacity for arsenate uptake in different water conditions. Yang Yu, Ling Yu, and J. Paul Chen. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.: February 9, 2015
  • Rich Structural Chemistry in New Alkali Metal Yttrium Tellurites: Three-Dimensional Frameworks of NaYTe4O10, KY(TeO3)2, RbY(TeO3)2, and a Novel Variant of Hexagonal Tungsten Bronze, CsYTe3O8. Youngkwon Kim, Dong Woo Lee, and Kang Min Ok. Inorg. Chem.: December 17, 2014
  • Versatile Reactivity of Diketiminato-Supported Yttrium Dialkyl Complex toward Aromatic N-Heterocycles. Yin Zhang, Jie Zhang, Jianquan Hong, Fangjun Zhang, Linhong Weng, and Xigeng Zhou. Organometallics: December 2, 2014
  • Unprecedented 3,4-Isoprene and cis-1,4-Butadiene Copolymers with Controlled Sequence Distribution by Single Yttrium Cationic Species. Bo Liu, Xingbao Wang, Yupeng Pan, Fei Lin, Chunji Wu, Jingping Qu, Yi Luo, and Dongmei Cui. Macromolecules: December 1, 2014
  • Synthesis and Characterization of Amine-Bridged Bis(phenolate) Yttrium Guanidinates and Their Application in the Ring-Opening Polymerization of 1,4-Dioxan-2-one. Tinghua Zeng, Yaorong Wang, Qi Shen, Yingming Yao, Yunjie Luo, and Dongmei Cui. Organometallics: November 19, 2014
  • Versatile 2-Methoxyethylaminobis(phenolate)yttrium Catalysts: Catalytic Precision Polymerization of Polar Monomers via Rare Earth Metal-Mediated Group Transfer Polymerization. Peter T. Altenbuchner, Benedikt S. Soller, Stefan Kissling, Thomas Bachmann, Alexander Kronast, Sergei I. Vagin, and Bernhard Rieger. Macromolecules: November 10, 2014
  • Thermochromism in Yttrium Iron Garnet Compounds. Hélène Serier-Brault, Lucile Thibault, Magalie Legrain, Philippe Deniard, Xavier Rocquefelte, Philippe Leone, Jean-Luc Perillon, Stéphanie Le Bris, Jean Waku, and Stéphane Jobic. Inorg. Chem.: November 10, 2014
  • Solvothermal Synthesis and Luminescence Properties of Yttrium Aluminum Garnet Monodispersed Crystallites with Well-Developed Faces. Meng M. Xu, Zhi J. Zhang, Jun J. Zhu, Jing T. Zhao, and Xiang Y. Chen. J. Phys. Chem. C: October 31, 2014
  • Oxygen Vacancy Effect on Photoluminescence Properties of Self-Activated Yttrium Tungstate. Bangfu Ding, Haijiao Qian, Chao Han, Junying Zhang, Sten-Eric Lindquist, Bin Wei, and Zilong Tang. J. Phys. Chem. C: October 10, 2014
  • Structural and Spectroscopic Characterization of Nd3+-Doped YVO4 Yttrium Orthovanadate Nanocrystallites. Rafal J. Wiglusz, Lukasz Marciniak, Robert Pazik, and Wieslaw Strek. Crystal Growth & Design: October 3, 2014

Recent Research & Development for Zirconium

  • Electrochemical Film Deposition of the Zirconium Metal-Organic Framework UiO-66 and Application in Miniaturized Sorbent Trap. Ivo Stassen, Mark J Styles, Tom R.C. Van Assche, Nicolo Campagnol, Jan Fransaer, Joeri F.M. Denayer, Jin-Chong Tan, Paolo Falcaro, Dirk E. De Vos, and Rob Paolo Ameloot. Chem. Mater.: February 16, 2015
  • Ceria Doped with Zirconium and Lanthanide oxides to Enhance Solar Thermochemical Production of Fuels. Friedemann Call, Martin Roeb, Martin Schmuecker, Christian Sattler, and Robert Pitz-Paal. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 10, 2015
  • Strain-Tunable One Dimensional Photonic Crystals Based on Zirconium Dioxide/Slide-Ring Elastomer Nanocomposites for Mechanochromic Sensing. Irene R. Howell, Cheng Li, Nicholas S. Colella, Kohzo Ito, and James J. Watkins. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 26, 2015
  • Probing Reactive Platinum Sites in UiO-67 Zirconium Metal–Organic Frameworks. Sigurd Øien, Giovanni Agostini, Stian Svelle, Elisa Borfecchia, Kirill A. Lomachenko, Lorenzo Mino, Erik Gallo, Silvia Bordiga, Unni Olsbye, Karl Petter Lillerud, and Carlo Lamberti. Chem. Mater.: January 7, 2015
  • Zirconium-Catalyzed Desymmetrization of Aminodialkenes and Aminodialkynes through Enantioselective Hydroamination. Kuntal Manna, Naresh Eedugurala, and Aaron D. Sadow. J. Am. Chem. Soc.: January 2, 2015
  • Trinuclear Zirconium Polyhydride ({Cp*Zr(BH3CH3)}(?-H)2{Cp*Zr(BH3CH3)}(?-H){Cp*Zr(BH3CH3)})(?-?2C,H:?1C:?2C,H-CHBH3) and Its Derivatives: Compounds Containing a Pentacoordinated Carbon Atom. Fu-Chen Liu, Heng-Guang Chen, and Gene-Hsiang Lee. Organometallics: December 19, 2014
  • Topology-Guided Design and Syntheses of Highly Stable Mesoporous Porphyrinic Zirconium Metal–Organic Frameworks with High Surface Area. Tian-Fu Liu, Dawei Feng, Ying-Pin Chen, Lanfang Zou, Mathieu Bosch, Shuai Yuan, Zhangwen Wei, Stephen Fordham, Kecheng Wang, and Hong-Cai Zhou. J. Am. Chem. Soc.: December 12, 2014
  • A Layered Mixed Zirconium Phosphate/Phosphonate with Exposed Carboxylic and Phosphonic Groups: X-ray Powder Structure and Proton Conductivity Properties. Anna Donnadio, Morena Nocchetti, Ferdinando Costantino, Marco Taddei, Mario Casciola, Fábio da Silva Lisboa, and Riccardo Vivani. Inorg. Chem.: November 26, 2014
  • Design and Optimization of a Phosphopeptide Anchor for Specific Immobilization of a Capture Protein on Zirconium Phosphonate Modified Supports. Hao Liu, Clémence Queffélec, Cathy Charlier, Alain Defontaine, Amina Fateh, Charles Tellier, Daniel R. Talham, and Bruno Bujoli. Langmuir: November 3, 2014
  • Neutral and Cationic Zirconium Hydrides Supported by a Dianionic (NNNN)-Type Macrocycle Ligand. Heiko Kulinna, Thomas P. Spaniol, and Jun Okuda. Organometallics: October 3, 2014