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Barium Strontium Cobalt Ferrite

BSCF

Linear Formula:

Ba-Sr-Co-Fe-O

ORDER

PRODUCT Product Code ORDER SAFETY DATA TECHNICAL DATA
Barium Strontium Cobalt Ferrite
BASRCO-FEIT-01-P
Pricing > SDS > Data Sheet >

Barium Strontium Cobalt Ferrite Properties (Theoretical)

Molecular Weight Varies by composition
Appearance Crystalline
Melting Point N/A
Boiling Point N/A
Density N/A
Solubility in H2O N/A
Crystal Phase / Structure perovskite

Barium Strontium Cobalt Ferrite Health & Safety Information

Signal Word N/A
Hazard Statements N/A
Hazard Codes N/A
Risk Codes N/A
Safety Statements N/A
Transport Information N/A
GHS Pictograms

View and Print SDS

SAFETY DATA SHEET

Date Created: 5/15/2015
Date Revised: 5/15/2015

SECTION 1. IDENTIFICATION

Product Name: Barium Strontium Cobalt Ferrite

Product Number: All applicable American Elements product codes, e.g. BASRCO-FEIT-01-P

Relevant identified uses of the substance: Scientific research and development


SECTION 2. HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION

Emergency Overview
OSHA Hazards
Target Organ Effect, Toxic by ingestion, Corrosive
Target Organs
Heart, Nerves., Kidney, Gastrointestinal tract, Bone marrow, Spleen., Liver
HMIS Classification
Health Hazard: 3
Chronic Health Hazard: *
Flammability: 0
Physical hazards: 0
NFPA Rating
Health Hazard: 3
Fire: 0
Reactivity Hazard: 0

Skull and Crossbones - GHS06

Potential Health Effects
Inhalation May be harmful if inhaled. Material is extremely destructive to the tissue of the mucous membranes and upper respiratory tract.
Skin May be harmful if absorbed through skin. Causes skin burns.
Eyes Causes eye burns.
Ingestion Toxic if swallowed. Causes burns.


SECTION 3. COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS

Barium Strontium Cobalt Ferrite Powder
CAS: N/A


SECTION 4. FIRST AID MEASURES

General advice
Consult a physician. Show this safety data sheet to the doctor in attendance.Move out of dangerous area.
If inhaled
If breathed in, move person into fresh air. If not breathing give artificial respiration Consult a physician.
In case of skin contact
Take off contaminated clothing and shoes immediately. Wash off with soap and plenty of water. Consult a physician.
In case of eye contact
Continue rinsing eyes during transport to hospital.Rinse thoroughly with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes and consult a physician.
If swallowed
Do NOT induce vomiting. Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious person. Rinse mouth with water. Consult a physician.


SECTION 5. FIREFIGHTING MEASURES

Flammable properties
Flash point not applicable
Ignition temperature no data available
Suitable extinguishing media
Use water spray, alcohol-resistant foam, dry chemical or carbon dioxide.
Special protective equipment for fire-fighters
Wear self contained breathing apparatus for fire fighting if necessary.


SECTION 6. ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES

Personal precautions
Use personal protective equipment. Avoid dust formation. Avoid breathing dust. Ensure adequate ventilation.
Evacuate personnel to safe areas.
Environmental precautions
Prevent further leakage or spillage if safe to do so. Do not let product enter drains.
Methods for cleaning up
Pick up and arrange disposal without creating dust. Keep in suitable, closed containers for disposal.


SECTION 7. HANDLING AND STORAGE

Handling
Avoid formation of dust and aerosols.
Provide appropriate exhaust ventilation at places where dust is formed. Normal measures for preventive fire protection.
Storage
Keep container tightly closed in a dry and well-ventilated place.
Keep in a dry place. Handle and store under inert gas. Air sensitive. Moisture sensitive.


SECTION 8. EXPOSURE CONTROLS/PERSONAL PROTECTION

Components with workplace control parameters

Value Control parameters Update Basis .
TWA 0.5 mg/m3 1993-06-30 US. Department of Labor -
Occupational Safety and Health
Administration (OSHA) Permissible
Exposure Limits (PEL) 29
CFR 1910.1000 Air Contaminants.
.
TWA 0.5 mg/m3 1989-03-01 US. Department of Labor -
Occupational Safety
and Health Administration (OSHA) 29
CFR 1910.1000 Z-1-A

TWA 0.5 mg/m3 1996-05-18 US. American Conference of
Governmental and Industrial
Hygienists Threshold Limit Values
for Chemical Substances in the Work
Environment; Annual Reports for the
Year 2004:Committees on Threshold
Limit Values (TLVs ) and Biological
Exposure Indices (BEIs)
Remarks
The agent (mixture , or exposure circumstance) is not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans . 1996 Adoption Refers to Appendix A -- Carcinogens.


SECTION 9. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

Appearance
Form powder
Safety data
pH no data available
Melting point no data available
Boiling point no data available
Flash point not applicable
Ignition temperature no data available
Lower explosion limit no data available
Upper explosion limit no data available
Density no data available
Water solubility no data available


SECTION 10. STABILITY AND REACTIVITY

Storage stability
Stable under recommended storage conditions.
Conditions to avoid
Avoid moisture.
Materials to avoid
acids, Acid chlorides, Acid anhydrides, Reducing agents
Hazardous decomposition products
Hazardous decomposition products formed under fire conditions. - Barium oxide


SECTION 11. TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Acute toxicity
LD50 Intraperitoneal - mouse - 146 mg/kg
Irritation and corrosion
no data available
Sensitisation
no data available
Chronic exposure
This product is or contains a component that is not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity based on its IARC, ACGIH, NTP, or EPA classification.
IARC: No component of this product present at levels greater than or equal to 0.1% is identified as probable, possible or confirmed human carcinogen by IARC.
NTP: No component of this product present at levels greater than or equal to 0.1% is identified as a known or anticipated carcinogen by NTP.
OSHA: No component of this product present at levels greater than or equal to 0.1% is identified as a carcinogen or potential carcinogen by OSHA.
Signs and Symptoms of Exposure
Cough, Shortness of breath, Headache, Nausea, Vomiting
Potential Health Effects
Inhalation May be harmful if inhaled. Material is extremely destructive to the tissue of the mucous membranes and upper respiratory tract.
Skin May be harmful if absorbed through skin. Causes skin burns.
Eyes Causes eye burns.
Ingestion Toxic if swallowed. Causes burns.
Target Organs Heart, Nerves., Kidney, Gastrointestinal tract, Bone marrow, Spleen., Liver,
Additional Information
RTECS: CQ9800000


SECTION 12. ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Elimination information (persistence and degradability)
no data available
Ecotoxicity effects
no data available
Further information on ecology
no data available


SECTION 13. DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS

Product
Observe all federal, state, and local environmental regulations. Contact a licensed professional waste disposal service to dispose of this material. Dissolve or mix the material with a combustible solvent and burn in a chemical incinerator equipped with an afterburner and scrubber.
Contaminated packaging
Dispose of as unused product.


SECTION 14. TRANSPORT INFORMATION

DOT (US)
UN-Number: 1884 Class: 6.1 Packing group: III
Proper shipping name: Barium oxide
Marine pollutant: No
Poison Inhalation Hazard: No
IMDG
UN-Number: 1884 Class: 6.1 Packing group: III EMS-No: F-A, S-A
Proper shipping name: BARIUM OXIDE
Marine pollutant: No
IATA
UN-Number: 1884 Class: 6.1 Packing group: III


SECTION 15. REGULATORY INFORMATION

OSHA Hazards
Target Organ Effect, Toxic by ingestion, Corrosive
DSL Status
All components of this product are on the Canadian DSL list.
SARA 302 Components
SARA 302: No chemicals in this material are subject to the reporting requirements of SARA Title III, Section 302.
SARA 313 Components
Barium oxide, obtained by calcining witherite
CAS-No.
1304-28-5
Revision Date
1989-12-01
SARA 311/312 Hazards
Acute Health Hazard, Chronic Health Hazard
Massachusetts Right To Know Components
No components are subject to the Massachusetts Right to Know Act.
Pennsylvania Right To Know Components
Barium oxide, obtained by calcining witherite
CAS-No.
1304-28-5
Revision Date
1989-12-01
New Jersey Right To Know Components
Barium oxide, obtained by calcining witherite
CAS-No.
1304-28-5
Revision Date
1989-12-01
California Prop. 65 Components
This product does not contain any chemicals known to State of California to cause cancer, birth, or any other
reproductive defects.


16. OTHER INFORMATION

Safety Data Sheet according to Regulation (EC) No. 1907/2006 (REACH). The above information is believed to be correct but does not purport to be all inclusive and shall be used only as a guide. The information in this document is based on the present state of our knowledge and is applicable to the product with regard to appropriate safety precautions. It does not represent any guarantee of the properties of the product. American Elements shall not be held liable for any damage resulting from handling or from contact with the above product. See reverse side of invoice or packing slip for additional terms and conditions of sale. COPYRIGHT 1997-2016 AMERICAN ELEMENTS. LICENSED GRANTED TO MAKE UNLIMITED PAPER COPIES FOR INTERNAL USE ONLY.

About Barium Strontium Cobalt Ferrite

Barium Strontium Cobalt Ferrite (BSCF) is a multielement oxide compound used as a cathode material for solid oxide fuel cells

Barium Strontium Cobalt Ferrite Synonyms

Barium Strontium Cobalt Iron Oxide, barium-strontium-cobalt-ferrite, BSCF, Ba1−ySryCo0.8Fe0.2O3−δ, Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.75Fe0.25O3−δ

Chemical Identifiers

Linear Formula Ba-Sr-Co-Fe-O
MDL Number N/A
EC No. N/A

Packaging Specifications

Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Safety Data Sheet (SDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes, and 36,000 lb. tanker trucks.

Related Elements

See more Barium products. Barium (atomic symbol: Ba, atomic number: 56) is a Block S, Group 2, Period 6 element with an atomic weight of 137.27. The number of electrons in each of barium's shells is [2, 8, 18, 18, 8, 2] and its electron configuration is [Xe] 6s2. Barium Bohr ModelBarium is a member of the alkaline-earth metals. The barium atom has a radius of 222 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 268 pm. Barium was discovered by Carl Wilhelm Scheele in 1772 and first isolated by Humphry Davy in 1808. Elemental BariumIn its elemental form, barium is a soft, silvery-gray metal. Industrial applications for barium include acting as a "getterer," or unwanted gas remover, for vacuum tubes, and as an additive to steel and cast iron. Barium is also alloyed with silicon and aluminum as load-bearing alloys. The main commercial source of barium is the mineral barite (BaSO4) it does not occur naturally as a free element . The name barium is derived from the Greek word "barys," meaning heavy.

See more Cobalt products. Cobalt (atomic symbol: Co, atomic number: 27) is a Block D, Group 9, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 58.933195. Cobalt Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of cobalt's shells is 2, 8, 15, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d7 4s2The cobalt atom has a radius of 125 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 192 pm. Cobalt was first discovered by George Brandt in 1732. In its elemental form, cobalt has a lustrous gray appearance. Cobalt is found in cobaltite, erythrite, glaucodot and skutterudite ores. Elemental CobaltCobalt produces brilliant blue pigments which have been used since ancient times to color paint and glass. Cobalt is a ferromagnetic metal and is used primarily in the production of magnetic and high-strength superalloys. Co-60, a commercially important radioisotope, is useful as a radioactive tracer and gamma ray source. The origin of the word Cobalt comes from the German word "Kobalt" or "Kobold," which translates as "goblin," "elf" or "evil spirit." For more information on cobalt, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of cobalt products, visit the Cobalt element page.

See more Iron products. Iron (atomic symbol: Fe, atomic number: 26) is a Block D, Group 8, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 55.845. The number of electrons in each of Iron's shells is 2, 8, 14, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d6 4s2. Iron Bohr ModelThe iron atom has a radius of 126 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 194 pm. Iron was discovered by humans before 5000 BC. In its elemental form, iron has a lustrous grayish metallic appearance. Iron is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust and the most common element by mass forming the earth as a whole. Iron is rarely found as a free element, since it tends to oxidize easily; it is usually found in minerals such as magnetite, hematite, goethite, limonite, or siderite.Elemental Iron Though pure iron is typically soft, the addition of carbon creates the alloy known as steel, which is significantly stronger.

See more Strontium products. Strontium (atomic symbol: Sr, atomic number: 38) is a Block S, Group 2, Period 5 element with an atomic weight of 87.62 . Strontium Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of Strontium's shells is [2, 8, 18, 8, 2] and its electron configuration is [Kr] 5s2. The strontium atom has a radius of 215 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 249 pm. Strontium was discovered by William Cruickshank in 1787 and first isolated by Humphry Davy in 1808. In its elemental form, strontium is a soft, silvery white metallic solid that quickly turns yellow when exposed to air. Elemental StrontiumCathode ray tubes in televisions are made of strontium, which are becoming increasingly displaced by other display technologies pyrotechnics and fireworks employ strontium salts to achhieve a bright red color. Radioactive isotopes of strontium have been used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and for certain cancer treatments. In nature, most strontium is found in celestite (as strontium sulfate) and strontianite (as strontium carbonate). Strontium was named after the Scottish town where it was discovered.

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