CAS #:

Linear Formula:

CoS

MDL Number:

MFCD00016032

EC No.:

215-273-3

ORDER

PRODUCT Product Code ORDER SAFETY DATA TECHNICAL DATA
(2N) 99% Cobalt(II) Sulfide Sputtering Target
CO2-S-02-ST
Pricing > SDS > Data Sheet >
(3N) 99.9% Cobalt(II) Sulfide Sputtering Target
CO2-S-03-ST
Pricing > SDS > Data Sheet >
(4N) 99.99% Cobalt(II) Sulfide Sputtering Target
CO2-S-04-ST
Pricing > SDS > Data Sheet >
(5N) 99.999% Cobalt(II) Sulfide Sputtering Target
CO2-S-05-ST
Pricing > SDS > Data Sheet >

Cobalt(II) Sulfide Sputtering Target Properties (Theoretical)

Compound Formula CoS
Molecular Weight 90.9982
Appearance Black solid
Melting Point 1,195° C
Boiling Point 1425 °C
Density 5.45 g/cm3
Solubility in H2O Insoluble
Exact Mass 90.905271
Monoisotopic Mass 90.905273 Da

Cobalt(II) Sulfide Sputtering Target Health & Safety Information

Signal Word Danger
Hazard Statements H317-H350
Hazard Codes Xn
Precautionary Statements P201-P202-P261-P272-P280-P281-P302+P352-P308+P313-P333+P313-P363-P501
RTECS Number GG3325000
Harmonized Tariff Code 2830.90
Transport Information UN 3077 9/PG III
GHS Pictograms
MSDS / SDS

About Cobalt(II) Sulfide Sputtering Target

American Elements specializes in producing high purity Cobalt(II) Sulfide Sputtering Targets with the highest possible density High Purity (99.99%) Cobalt(II) Sulfide Sputtering Targetand smallest possible average grain sizes for use in semiconductor, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) display and optical applications. Our standard sputtering targets for thin film deposition are available monoblock or bonded with planar target dimensions and configurations up to 820 mm with hole drill locations and threading, beveling, grooves and backing designed to work with both older sputtering devices as well as the latest process equipment, such as large area coating for solar energy or fuel cells and flip-chip applications. Rotary (cylindrical), round, rectangular, square, ring, annular, oval, "dog-bone" and other shaped targets are available in standard, custom, and research sized dimensions. All targets are analyzed using best demonstrated techniques including X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry (GDMS), and Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP). Materials are produced using crystallization, solid state and other ultra high purification processes such as sublimation. American Elements specializes in producing custom compositions for commercial and research applications and for new proprietary technologies. Please request a quote above for more information on lead time and pricing.

Cobalt(II) Sulfide Sputtering Target Synonyms

Cobalt(II) sulphide; Cobalt monosulfide; cobalt(2+) sulfide; sulfanylidenecobalt; Cobalt sulfide (amorphous); Cobalt sulphide; Sycoporite; cobaltous sulfide; Co8.4S8; Co6S5; Co4S3; CoxSy

Chemical Identifiers

Linear Formula CoS
MDL Number MFCD00016032
EC No. 215-273-3
Beilstein/Reaxys No. N/A
Pubchem CID 14832
IUPAC Name sulfanylidenecobalt
SMILES [Co+2].[S-2]
InchI Identifier InChI=1S/Co.S/q+2;-2
InchI Key INPLXZPZQSLHBR-UHFFFAOYSA-N

Packaging Specifications

Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Safety Data Sheet (SDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes, and 36,000 lb. tanker trucks.

Payment Methods

American Elements accepts checks, wire transfers, ACH, most major credit and debit cards (Visa, MasterCard, AMEX, Discover) and Paypal.

For the convenience of our international customers, American Elements offers the following additional payment methods:

SOFORT bank tranfer payment for Austria, Belgium, Germany and SwitzerlandJCB cards for Japan and WorldwideBoleto Bancario for BraziliDeal payments for the Netherlands, Germany, Austria, Belgium, Italy, Poland, Spain, Switzerland, and the United KingdomGiroPay for GermanyDankort cards for DenmarkElo cards for BrazileNETS for SingaporeCartaSi for ItalyCarte-Bleue cards for FranceChina UnionPayHipercard cards for BrazilTROY cards for TurkeyBC cards for South KoreaRuPay for India

Related Elements

Cobalt

See more Cobalt products. Cobalt (atomic symbol: Co, atomic number: 27) is a Block D, Group 9, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 58.933195. Cobalt Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of cobalt's shells is 2, 8, 15, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d7 4s2The cobalt atom has a radius of 125 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 192 pm. Cobalt was first discovered by George Brandt in 1732. In its elemental form, cobalt has a lustrous gray appearance. Cobalt is found in cobaltite, erythrite, glaucodot and skutterudite ores. Elemental CobaltCobalt produces brilliant blue pigments which have been used since ancient times to color paint and glass. Cobalt is a ferromagnetic metal and is used primarily in the production of magnetic and high-strength superalloys. Co-60, a commercially important radioisotope, is useful as a radioactive tracer and gamma ray source. The origin of the word Cobalt comes from the German word "Kobalt" or "Kobold," which translates as "goblin," "elf" or "evil spirit." For more information on cobalt, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of cobalt products, visit the Cobalt element page.

Sulfur

See more Sulfur products. Sulfur (or Sulphur) (atomic symbol: S, atomic number: 16) is a Block P, Group 16, Period 3 element with an atomic radius of 32.066. Sulfur Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of Sulfur's shells is 2, 8, 6 and its electron configuration is [Ne] 3s2 3p4. In its elemental form, sulfur has a light yellow appearance. The sulfur atom has a covalent radius of 105 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 180 pm. In nature, sulfur can be found in hot springs, meteorites, volcanoes, and as galena, gypsum, and epsom salts. Sulfur has been known since ancient times but was not accepted as an element until 1777, when Antoine Lavoisier helped to convince the scientific community that it was an element and not a compound.

TODAY'S SCIENCE POST!

September 29, 2020
Los Angeles, CA
Each business day American Elements' scientists & engineers post their choice for the most exciting materials science news of the day
3-D camera earns its stripes

3-D camera earns its stripes