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Cobalt Nickel Chromium Iron Molybdenum Titanium Alloy

Linear Formula:

Co Ni Cr Fe Mo Ti

ORDER

PRODUCT Product Code ORDER SAFETY DATA TECHNICAL DATA
Co- Ni-26% Cr-19% Fe-0.9% Mo-0.7% Ti-0.3%
CONICR-FEMOTI-01-P.03TI
Pricing > SDS > Data Sheet >

Properties

Appearance

Solid

Health & Safety Info  |  MSDS / SDS

Signal Word N/A
Hazard Statements N/A
Hazard Codes N/A
Transport Information N/A
MSDS / SDS

About

Cobalt Nickel Chromium Iron Molybdenum Titanium is one of numerous metal alloys sold by American Elements under the trade name AE Alloys™. Generally immediately available in most volumes, AE Alloys™ are available as bar, ingot, ribbon, wire, shot, sheet, and foil. Ultra high purity and high purity forms also include metal powder, submicron powder and nanoscale, targets for thin film deposition, and pellets for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) applications. American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards. Typical and custom packaging is available. Primary applications include bearing assembly, ballast, casting, step soldering, and radiation shielding.

Synonyms

N/A

Chemical Identifiers

Linear Formula

Co Ni Cr Fe Mo Ti

Packaging Specifications

Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Safety Data Sheet (SDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes, and 36,000 lb. tanker trucks.

Related Elements

See more Cobalt products. Cobalt (atomic symbol: Co, atomic number: 27) is a Block D, Group 9, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 58.933195. Cobalt Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of cobalt's shells is 2, 8, 15, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d7 4s2The cobalt atom has a radius of 125 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 192 pm. Cobalt was first discovered by George Brandt in 1732. In its elemental form, cobalt has a lustrous gray appearance. Cobalt is found in cobaltite, erythrite, glaucodot and skutterudite ores. Elemental CobaltCobalt produces brilliant blue pigments which have been used since ancient times to color paint and glass. Cobalt is a ferromagnetic metal and is used primarily in the production of magnetic and high-strength superalloys. Co-60, a commercially important radioisotope, is useful as a radioactive tracer and gamma ray source. The origin of the word Cobalt comes from the German word "Kobalt" or "Kobold," which translates as "goblin," "elf" or "evil spirit." For more information on cobalt, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of cobalt products, visit the Cobalt element page.

See more Nickel products. Nickel (atomic symbol: Ni, atomic number: 28) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 58.6934. Nickel Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of nickel's shells is [2, 8, 16, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar]3d8 4s2. Nickel was first discovered by Alex Constedt in 1751. The nickel atom has a radius of 124 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 184 pm. In its elemental form, nickel has a lustrous metallic silver appearance. Nickel is a hard and ductile transition metal that is considered corrosion-resistant because of its slow rate of oxidation. Elemental NickelIt is one of four elements that are ferromagnetic and is used in the production of various type of magnets for commercial use. Nickel is sometimes found free in nature but is more commonly found in ores. The bulk of mined nickel comes from laterite and magmatic sulfide ores. The name originates from the German word kupfernickel, which means "false copper" from the illusory copper color of the ore.

See more Chromium products. Chromium (atomic symbol: Cr, atomic number: 24) is a Block D, Group 6, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 51.9961. Chromium Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of Chromium's shells is 2, 8, 13, 1 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d5 4s1. Chromium was first discovered by Louis Nicolas Vauquelin in 1797. It was first isolated in 1798, also by Louis Nicolas Vauquelin. The chromium atom has a radius of 128 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 189 pm. In its elemental form, chromium has a lustrous steel-gray appearance. Elemental ChromiumChromium is the hardest metal element in the periodic table and the only element that exhibits antiferromagnetic ordering at room temperature, above which it tranforms into a paramagnetic solid. The most common source of chromium is chromite ore (FeCr2O4). Due to its various colorful compounds, Chromium was named after the Greek word 'chroma' meaning color.

See more Iron products. Iron (atomic symbol: Fe, atomic number: 26) is a Block D, Group 8, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 55.845. The number of electrons in each of Iron's shells is 2, 8, 14, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d6 4s2. Iron Bohr ModelThe iron atom has a radius of 126 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 194 pm. Iron was discovered by humans before 5000 BC. In its elemental form, iron has a lustrous grayish metallic appearance. Iron is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust and the most common element by mass forming the earth as a whole. Iron is rarely found as a free element, since it tends to oxidize easily; it is usually found in minerals such as magnetite, hematite, goethite, limonite, or siderite.Elemental Iron Though pure iron is typically soft, the addition of carbon creates the alloy known as steel, which is significantly stronger.

See more Molybdenum products. Molybdenum (atomic symbol: Mo, atomic number: 42) is a Block D, Group 6, Period 5 element with an atomic weight of 95.96. Molybdenum Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of molybdenum's shells is [2, 8, 18, 13, 1] and its electron configuration is [Kr] 4d5 5s1. The molybdenum atom has a radius of 139 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 209 pm. In its elemental form, molybdenum has a gray metallic appearance. Molybdenum was discovered by Carl Wilhelm in 1778 and first isolated by Peter Jacob Hjelm in 1781. Molybdenum is the 54th most abundant element in the earth's crust. Elemental MolybdenumIt has the third highest melting point of any element, exceeded only by tungsten and tantalum. Molybdenum does not occur naturally as a free metal, it is found in various oxidation states in minerals. The primary commercial source of molybdenum is molybdenite, although it is also recovered as a byproduct of copper and tungsten mining. The origin of the name Molybdenum comes from the Greek word molubdos meaning lead.

See more Titanium products. Titanium (atomic symbol: Ti, atomic number: 22) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 47.867. The number of electrons in each of Titanium's shells is [2, 8, 10, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d2 4s2. Titanium Bohr ModelThe titanium atom has a radius of 147 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 187 pm. Titanium was discovered by William Gregor in 1791 and first isolated by Jöns Jakob Berzelius in 1825. In its elemental form, titanium has a silvery grey-white metallic appearance. Titanium's properties are chemically and physically similar to zirconium, both of which have the same number of valence electrons and are in the same group in the periodic table. Elemental TitaniumTitanium has five naturally occurring isotopes: 46Ti through 50Ti, with 48Ti being the most abundant (73.8%). Titanium is found in igneous rocks and the sediments derived from them. It is named after the word Titanos, which is Greek for Titans.

Recent Research

A bioinspired ionic liquid tagged cobalt-salophen complex for nonenzymatic detection of glucose., Benjamin, Michael, Manoj Devaraj, Thenmozhi Kathavarayan, Bhagat Pundlik Rambhau, Saravanakumar Duraisamy, and Senthilkumar Sellappan , Biosens Bioelectron, 2017 May 15, Volume 91, p.380-387, (2017)

In-situ growth of ultrathin cobalt monoxide nanocrystals on reduced graphene oxide substrates: an efficient electrocatalyst for aprotic Li-O2 batteries., Yuan, Mengwei, Lin Liu, Yang Yan, Nan Caiyun, Ma Shulan, Sun Genban, and Li Huifeng , Nanotechnology, 2017 May 05, Volume 28, Issue 18, p.185401, (2017)

The enhanced spin-polarized transport behaviors through cobalt benzene-porphyrin-benzene molecular junctions: the effect of functional groups., Cheng, Jue-Fei, Zhou Liping, Wen Zhongqian, Yan Qiang, Han Qin, and Gao Lei , J Phys Condens Matter, 2017 May 04, Volume 29, Issue 17, p.175201, (2017)

Sensitive kinetic-catalytic spectrophotometric method for cobalt determination using a chip coupled to a multisyringe flow injection analysis system., Abouhiat, Fatima Zohra, Henríquez Camelia, Yousfi Farida El, and Cerdà Victor , Talanta, 2017 May 01, Volume 166, p.405-411, (2017)

Surfactant-cobalt(III) complexes: The impact of hydrophobicity on interaction with HSA and DNA - insights from experimental and theoretical approach., Veeralakshmi, Selvakumar, Sabapathi Gopal, Nehru Selvan, Venuvanalingam Ponnambalam, and Arunachalam Sankaralingam , Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces, 2017 May 01, Volume 153, p.85-94, (2017)

Sonochemical oxidation of vanillyl alcohol to vanillin in the presence of a cobalt oxide catalyst under mild conditions., Behling, Ronan, Chatel Gregory, and Valange Sabine , Ultrason Sonochem, 2017 May, Volume 36, p.27-35, (2017)

Alleviating effects of calcium on cobalt toxicity in two barley genotypes differing in cobalt tolerance., Lwalaba, Jonas Lwalaba Wa, Zvobgo Gerald, Fu Liangbo, Zhang Xuelei, Mwamba Theodore Mulembo, Muhammad Noor, Mundende Robert Prince Muk, and Zhang Guoping , Ecotoxicol Environ Saf, 2017 May, Volume 139, p.488-495, (2017)

Toxicity assessment of arsenic and cobalt in the presence of aquatic humic substances of different molecular sizes., Watanabe, Cláudia Hitomi, Monteiro Adnivia Santos Cos, Gontijo Erik Sartori Je, Lira Vivian Silva, Bueno Carolina de Castro, Kumar Nirmal Tej, Fracácio Renata, and Rosa André Henrique , Ecotoxicol Environ Saf, 2017 May, Volume 139, p.1-8, (2017)

Simple synthesis of cobalt sulfide nanorods for efficient electrocatalytic oxidation of vanillin in food samples., Sivakumar, Mani, Sakthivel Mani, and Chen Shen-Ming , J Colloid Interface Sci, 2017 Mar 15, Volume 490, p.719-726, (2017)

Cobalt nanoparticles/nitrogen-doped graphene with high nitrogen doping efficiency as noble metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction., Liang, Jingwen, Hassan Mehboob, Zhu Dongsheng, Guo Liping, and Bo Xiangjie , J Colloid Interface Sci, 2017 Mar 15, Volume 490, p.576-586, (2017)

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April 24, 2017
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