Iron(II) Titanate



Request Quote

Product Code Available Product Forms Request A Quote
FE2-TAT-05-I (5N) 99.999% Iron(II) Titanate Ingot Request
FE2-TAT-05-L (5N) 99.999% Iron(II) Titanate Lump Request
FE2-TAT-05-P (5N) 99.999% Iron(II) Titanate Powder Request
FE2-TAT-05-ST (5N) 99.999% Iron(II) Titanate Sputtering Target Request


Compound Formula FeH2O3Ti
Molecular Weight 151.71
Appearance Gray to black powder
Melting Point N/A
Boiling Point N/A
Density N/A
Exact Mass 153.883278
Monoisotopic Mass 153.883278
Charge N/A

Health & Safety Info  |  MSDS / SDS

Signal Word Warning
Hazard Statements H302-H312-H315-H319-H332-H335-H351
Hazard Codes Xn
Risk Codes 20/21/22-36/37/38-40
Safety Statements 22-26-36
RTECS Number N/A
Transport Information N/A
WGK Germany 3
Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling (GHS) N/A


Iron(II) Titanate is generally immediately available in most volumes. High purity, submicron and nanopowder forms may be considered. Titanate compounds contain a form of Titanium Oxide and have various applications including electronics, ceramics, and batteries (in the case of Lithium Titanate). Researchers from the University of Illinois recently created nanofiber mats of zinc titanate that can scrub sulfur impurities from petroleum-based fuels more efficiently than existing methods, a nanotechnology-based development that may lower the cost of fuel technologies in the future. American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards. Typical and custom packaging is available. Additional technical, research and safety (MSDS) information is available as is a Reference Calculator for converting relevant units of measurement.


Iron titanium trioxide, iron titanium oxide, iron(2+) titanate

Chemical Identifiers

Formula FeTiO3
CAS 12022-71-8
Pubchem CID 3709578
MDL MFCD00064704
EC No. 234-667-6
IUPAC Name dihydroxy(oxo) titanium; iron
Beilstein Registry No. N/A
SMILES O[Ti](=O)O.[Fe]
InchI Identifier InChI=1S/Fe.2H2O.O.Ti/h;2*1H2;;/q;;;;+2/p-2

Packaging Specifications

Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.

Related Products & Element Information

See more Iron products. Iron (atomic symbol: Fe, atomic number: 26) is a Block D, Group 8, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 55.845. The number of electrons in each of Iron's shells is 2, 8, 14, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d6 4s2. Iron Bohr ModelThe iron atom has a radius of 126 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 194 pm. Iron was discovered by humans before 5000 BC. In its elemental form, iron has a lustrous grayish metallic appearance. Elemental IronIron is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust and the most common element by mass forming the earth as a whole. Iron is rarely found as a free element, since it tends to oxidize easily it is usually found in minerals such as magnetite, hematite, goethite, limonite, or siderite. Though pure iron is typically soft, the addition of carbon creates the alloy known as steel, which is significantly stronger. For more information on iron, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of iron products, visit the Iron element page. .

See more Titanium products. Titanium (atomic symbol: Ti, atomic number: 22) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 47.867. The number of electrons in each of Titanium's shells is [2, 8, 10, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d2 4s2. Titanium Bohr ModelThe titanium atom has a radius of 147 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 187 pm. Titanium was discovered by William Gregor in 1791 and first isolated by Jöns Jakob Berzelius in 1825. In its elemental form, titanium has a silvery grey-white metallic appearance. Titanium's properties are chemically and physically similar to zirconium, both of which have the same number of valence electrons and are in the same group in the periodic table. Elemental TitaniumTitanium has five naturally occurring isotopes: 46Ti through 50Ti, with 48Ti being the most abundant (73.8%). Titanium is found in igneous rocks and the sediments derived from them. It is named after the word Titanos, which is Greek for Titans.