Iron(II) Titanate

FeTiO3

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About

Iron(II) Titanate is generally immediately available in most volumes. High purity, submicron and nanopowder forms may be considered. Titanate compounds contain a form of Titanium Oxide and have various applications including electronics, ceramics, and batteries (in the case of Lithium Titanate). Researchers from the University of Illinois recently created nanofiber mats of zinc titanate that can scrub sulfur impurities from petroleum-based fuels more efficiently than existing methods, a nanotechnology-based development that may lower the cost of fuel technologies in the future. American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards. Typical and custom packaging is available. Additional technical, research and safety (MSDS) information is available as is a Reference Calculator for converting relevant units of measurement.

Synonyms

Iron titanium trioxide, iron titanium oxide, iron(2+) titanate

Chemical Identifiers

Formula FeTiO3
CAS 12022-71-8
Pubchem CID 3709578
MDL MFCD00064704
EC No. 234-667-6
IUPAC Name dihydroxy(oxo) titanium; iron
Beilstein Registry No. N/A
SMILES O[Ti](=O)O.[Fe]
InchI Identifier InChI=1S/Fe.2H2O.O.Ti/h;2*1H2;;/q;;;;+2/p-2
InchI Key JIAXFBFASROBHB-UHFFFAOYSA-L

Properties

Compound Formula FeH2O3Ti
Molecular Weight 151.71
Appearance Gray to black powder
Melting Point N/A
Boiling Point N/A
Density N/A
Exact Mass 153.883278
Monoisotopic Mass 153.883278
Charge N/A

Health & Safety Info  |  MSDS / SDS

Signal Word Warning
Hazard Statements H302-H312-H315-H319-H332-H335-H351
Hazard Codes Xn
Risk Codes 20/21/22-36/37/38-40
Safety Statements 22-26-36
RTECS Number N/A
Transport Information N/A
WGK Germany 3
Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling (GHS) N/A
MSDS / SDS

Packaging Specifications

Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.

Related Products

FeSee more Iron products. Iron (atomic symbol: Fe, atomic number: 26) is a Block D, Group 8, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 55.845. The number of electrons in each of Iron's shells is 2, 8, 14, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d6 4s2. The iron atom has a radius of 126 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 194 pm. Iron was discovered by humans before 5000 BC. In its elemental form, iron has a lustrous grayish metallic appearance. Iron is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust and the most common element by mass forming the earth as a whole. Iron is rarely found as a free element, since it tends to oxidize easily it is usually found in minerals such as magnetite, hematite, goethite, limonite, or siderite. Though pure iron is typically soft, the addition of carbon creates the alloy known as steel, which is significantly stronger. For more information on iron, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of iron products, visit the Iron element page. .

TiSee more Titanium products. Titanium (atomic symbol: Ti, atomic number: 22) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 47.867. The number of electrons in each of Titanium's shells is [2, 8, 10, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d2 4s2. The titanium atom has a radius of 147 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 187 pm. Titanium was discovered by William Gregor in 1791 and first isolated by Jöns Jakob Berzelius in 1825. In its elemental form, titanium has a silvery grey-white metallic appearance. Titanium's properties are chemically and physically similar to zirconium, both of which have the same number of valence electrons and are in the same group in the periodic table. Titanium has five naturally occurring isotopes: 46Ti through 50Ti, with 48Ti being the most abundant (73.8%). Titanium is found in igneous rocks and the sediments derived from them. It is named after the word Titanos, which is Greek for Titans.

Research

Recent Research & Development for Titanium

  • The effects of aging process and preactivation on mechanical properties of nickel-titanium closed coil springs. Alavi S, Haerian A. Dent Res J (Isfahan). 2015 May-Jun
  • Mini titanium plates and screws for cranial bone flap fixation; an experience from Pakistan. Bukhari SS, Junaid M. Surg Neurol Int. 2015 May 8
  • β-cyclodextrin functionalized meso-/macroporous magnetic titanium dioxide adsorbent as extraction material combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the detection of chlorobenzenes in soil samples. Zhang J, Gan N, Chen S, Pan M, Wu D, Cao Y. J Chromatogr A. 2015 May 6.
  • A highly efficient flexible dye-sensitized solar cell based on nickel sulfide/platinum/titanium counter electrode. Yue G, Ma X, Zhang W, Li F, Wu J, Li G. Nanoscale Res Lett. 2015 Jan 10
  • Forced degradation studies, and effect of surfactants and titanium dioxide on the photostability of paliperidone by HPLC. Marothu VK, Nellutla A, Gorrepati M, Majeti S, Mamidala SK. Ann Pharm Fr. 2015 May 13.
  • Effect of fluoride on nickel-titanium and stainless steel orthodontic archwires: an in-vitro study. Heravi F, Moayed MH, Mokhber N. J Dent (Tehran). 2015 Jan
  • Intratracheally instilled titanium dioxide nanoparticles translocate to heart and liver and activate complement cascade in the heart of C57BL/6 mice. Husain M, Wu D, Saber AT, Decan N, Jacobsen NR, Williams A, Yauk CL, Wallin H, Vogel U, Halappanavar S. Nanotoxicology. 2015 May 20:1-10.
  • Photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue and inactivation of pathogenic bacteria using silver nanoparticles modified titanium dioxide thin films. Ibrahim HM. World J Microbiol Biotechnol. 2015 Apr 16. : World J Microbiol Biotechnol
  • Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles on the Synthesis of Fibroin in Silkworm (Bombyx mori). Ni M, Li F, Tian J, Hu J, Zhang H, Xu K, Wang B, Li Y, Shen W, Li B. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2015 Feb 11. : Biol Trace Elem Res
  • Electronic structures and current conductivities of B, C, N and F defects in amorphous titanium dioxide. Pham HH, Wang LW. Phys Chem Chem Phys. 2015 Apr 14. : Phys Chem Chem Phys

Recent Research & Development for Iron

  • Humic acids enhance the microbially mediated release of sedimentary ferrous iron. Chang CH, Wei CC, Lin LH, Tu TH, Liao VH. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2015 May 22.
  • An update on iron acquisition by Legionella pneumophila: new pathways for siderophore uptake and ferric iron reduction. Cianciotto NP. Future Microbiol. 2015 May
  • Iron accumulation promotes TACE-mediated TNF-α secretion and neurodegeneration in a mouse model of ALS. Lee JK, Shin JH, Gwag BJ, Choi EJ. Neurobiol Dis. 2015 May 19.
  • Colorimetric detection of iron ions (III) based on the highly sensitive plasmonic response of the N-acetyl-l-cysteine-stabilized silver nanoparticles. Gao X, Lu Y, He S, Li X, Chen W. Anal Chim Acta. 2015 Jun 16
  • Superparamagnetic iron oxide as a tracer for sentinel node biopsy in breast cancer: A comparative non-inferiority study. Piñero-Madrona A, Torró-Richart JA, de León-Carrillo JM, de Castro-Parga G, Navarro-Cecilia J, Domínguez-Cunchillos F, Román-Santamaría JM, Fuster-Diana C, Pardo-García R; “Grupo de Estudios Senológicos de la Sociedad Española de Patologia Mamaria (SESPM)”. Eur J Surg Oncol. 2015 May 12.
  • Functionalized magnetic iron oxide/alginate core-shell nanoparticles for targeting hyperthermia. Liao SH, Liu CH, Bastakoti BP, Suzuki N, Chang Y, Yamauchi Y, Lin FH, Wu KC. Int J Nanomedicine. 2015 May 4
  • Characterization of the enhancement of zero valent iron on microbial azo reduction. Fang Y, Xu M, Wu WM, Chen X, Sun G, Guo J, Liu X. BMC Microbiol. 2015 Apr 10: BMC Microbiol
  • Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for in vivo molecular and cellular imaging. Sharifi S, Seyednejad H, Laurent S, Atyabi F, Saei AA, Mahmoudi M. Contrast Media Mol Imaging. 2015 Apr 16.: Contrast Media Mol Imaging
  • Transformation of triclosan to 2,8-dichlorodibenzo-p-dioxin by iron and manganese oxides under near dry conditions. Ding J, Su M, Wu C, Lin K. Chemosphere. 2015 Apr 13: Chemosphere
  • Application of iron oxide b nanoparticles in neuronal tissue engineering. Ziv-Polat O, Margel S, Shahar A. Neural Regen Res. 2015 Feb: Neural Regen Res

Recent Research & Development for Titanates

  • Two-dimensional wavelike spinel lithium titanate for fast lithium storage. Liu J, Wei X, Liu XW. Sci Rep. 2015 May 18
  • Coating lithium titanate with nitrogen-doped carbon by simple refluxing for high-power lithium-ion batteries. Long du H, Jeong MG, Lee YS, Choi W, Lee JK, Oh IH, Jung HG. ACS Appl Mater Interfaces. 2015 May 20
  • Unfolding grain size effects in barium titanate ferroelectric ceramics. Tan Y, Zhang J, Wu Y, Wang C, Koval V, Shi B, Ye H, McKinnon R, Viola G, Yan H. Sci Rep. 2015 May 7
  • Oxygen diffusion in single crystal barium titanate. Kessel M, De Souza RA, Martin M. Phys Chem Chem Phys. 2015 May 6
  • One-dimensional carbon nanotube@barium titanate@polyaniline multiheterostructures for microwave absorbing application. Ni QQ, Zhu YF, Yu LJ, Fu YQ. Nanoscale Res Lett. 2015 Apr 11
  • Synthesis of [111]- and {010}-faceted anatase TiO2 nanocrystals from tri-titanate nanosheets and their photocatalytic and DSSC performances. Chen C, Ikeuchi Y, Xu L, Sewvandi GA, Kusunose T, Tanaka Y, Nakanishi S, Wen P, Feng Q. Nanoscale. 2015 Apr 24
  • MoS2 Nanoparticles Decorating Titanate-Nanotube Surfaces: Combined Microscopy, Spectroscopy, and Catalytic Studies. Cravanzola S, Muscuso L, Cesano F, Agostini G, Damin A, Scarano D, Zecchina A. Langmuir. 2015 May 19
  • Patterned growth of Au nanoparticles on polycrystalline lead zirconate titanate surfaces. Kim JH, Kwon S, Yang W. J Nanosci Nanotechnol. 2014 Oct
  • Biocompatibility and osteogenesis of the castor bean polymer doped with silica (SiO2) or barium titanate (BaTiO3) nanoparticles. Nacer RS, Silva BA, Poppi RR, Silva DK, Cardoso VS, Delben JR, Delben AA. Acta Cir Bras. 2015 Apr

Free Test Sample Program

We recognize many of our customers are purchasing small quantities directly online as trial samples in anticipation of placing a larger future order or multiple orders as a raw material for production. Since our primary business is the production of industrial quantities and/or highly consistent batches which can be used for commercial production and purchased repeatedly in smaller quantity, American Elements offers trial samples at no charge on the following basis. Within 6 months of purchasing materials directly online from us, you have the option to refer back to that order and advise that it is the intention of your company, institution or lab to either purchase a larger quantity, purchase the material in regular intervals or purchase more on some other basis.

We will then evaluate your future needs and assuming the quantity or number of future purchases qualify, we will fully credit your purchase price with the next order. Because of the many variables in the quantity and number of orders you may place, it is impossible to evaluate whether your future order(s) will qualify for this program prior to your placing your next order. Please know American Elements strongly desires to make this free sample program available to you and will make every effort to do so once your next order is placed.