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Lanthanum Strontium Manganite (LSM) - Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ)

50% Lanthanum Manganite doped with Strontium Oxide - 50% Yttria Stabilized Zirconium Oxide Composite Fuel Cell Cathode

Linear Formula:

50% (La0.80 Sr0.20) Mn 03-x / 50% (Y2O3)0.08(ZrO2)0.92

ORDER

PRODUCT Product Code ORDER SAFETY DATA TECHNICAL DATA
LSM-YSZ (Sr = 20% - Gd = 10%) Ink
LSM-YSZ-2010-I
Pricing > SDS > Data Sheet >
LSM-YSZ (Sr = 20% - Gd = 10%) Powder
LSM-YSZ-2010-P
Pricing > SDS > Data Sheet >

Lanthanum Strontium Manganite (LSM) - Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) Properties (Theoretical)

Appearance Powder or ink
Melting Point N/A
Boiling Point N/A
Density N/A

Lanthanum Strontium Manganite (LSM) - Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) Health & Safety Information

Signal Word N/A
Hazard Statements N/A
Hazard Codes N/A
Transport Information N/A
MSDS / SDS

About Lanthanum Strontium Manganite (LSM) - Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ)

solid oxide fuel cell anode (Nickel Cermet) by SEMAmerican Elements specializes in producing LSM-YSZ for fuel cell cathode applications utilizing solid state processing to produce single phase perovskite structures with various doping levels and surface areas (SSA) for use in thin film layers. Upon firing, American Elements' LSM-YSZ will partially sinter to form well-defined necks and open gas paths to permit simultaneous gas and electrical transfer. LSM-YSZ has an excellent thermal expansion match with Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes. It is highly electronically conductive and has proven long term stability. LSM-YSZ belongs to a class of "A" site and "B" site doped perovskite structures with these properties. These include Lanthanum Strontium Ferrite (LSF), Lanthanum Strontium Cobaltite Ferrite (LSCF), Lanthanum Calcium Manganite (LCM), Lanthanum Strontium Chromite (LSC), and Lanthanum Strontium Gallate Magnesite (LSGM). Yttria Stabilized Zirconia is available both partially and fully stabilized. Grades are available for applications include structural ceramics for turbine blades and anti-ballistic and armour ceramics and ionically conductive uses. A variety of surface areas can be produced. Forms include tape casting powder, screen printable ink and plasma spray/thermal spray powder. Proprietary formulations can be produced under non-disclosure arrangements. LSM-YSZ is available as a powder for tape casting, air spray/thermal spray/plasma spray, extrusion and sputtering fuel cell applications and as an ink for screen printing. Oxygen starved compositions are available. American Elements provides guidance on firing parameters, doping levels, and thermal expansion matching with American Elements' electrolyte and interconnect fuel cell layers. Also see product data sheets for LSM-20-P and LSM-20-I. Yttrium has the highest thermo-dynamic affinity for oxygen, useful in ceramics for crucibles for molten reactive metals, in florescent phosphors, computer displays and automotive fuel sensors. Yttria stabilized zirconia is used in high temperature applications and as an electrolyte in fuel cells. Additional technical information, such as resistivity and ink rheology data, and safety (MSDS) information are also available.

Lanthanum Strontium Manganite (LSM) - Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) Synonyms

LSM-YSZ

Chemical Identifiers

Linear Formula 50% (La0.80 Sr0.20) Mn 03-x / 50% (Y2O3)0.08(ZrO2)0.92
MDL Number N/A
EC No. N/A

Packaging Specifications

Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Safety Data Sheet (SDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes, and 36,000 lb. tanker trucks.

Related Elements

See more Lanthanum products. Lanthanum (atomic symbol: La, atomic number: 57) is a Block F, Group 3, Period 6 element with an atomic weight of 138.90547. Lanthanum Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of lanthanum's shells is [2, 8, 18, 18, 9, 2] and its electron configuration is [Xe] 5d1 6s2. The lanthanum atom has a radius of 187 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 240 pm. Lanthanum was first discovered by Carl Mosander in 1838. In its elemental form, lanthanum has a silvery white appearance.Elemental Lanthanum It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal that oxidizes easily in air. Lanthanum is the first element in the rare earth or lanthanide series. It is the model for all the other trivalent rare earths and it is the second most abundant of the rare earths after cerium. Lanthanum is found in minerals such as monazite and bastnasite. The name lanthanum originates from the Greek word Lanthaneia, which means 'to lie hidden'.

See more Manganese products. Manganese (atomic symbol: Mn, atomic number: 25) is a Block D, Group 7, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 54.938045. Manganese Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of Manganese's shells is [2, 8, 13, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d5 4s2. The manganese atom has a radius of 127 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 197 pm. Manganese was first discovered by Torbern Olof Bergman in 1770 and first isolated by Johann Gottlieb Gahn in 1774. In its elemental form, manganese has a silvery metallic appearance. Elemental ManganeseIt is a paramagnetic metal that oxidizes easily in addition to being very hard and brittle. Manganese is found as a free element in nature and also in the minerals pyrolusite, braunite, psilomelane, and rhodochrosite. The name Manganese originates from the Latin word mangnes, meaning "magnet."

See more Strontium products. Strontium (atomic symbol: Sr, atomic number: 38) is a Block S, Group 2, Period 5 element with an atomic weight of 87.62 . Strontium Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of Strontium's shells is [2, 8, 18, 8, 2] and its electron configuration is [Kr] 5s2. The strontium atom has a radius of 215 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 249 pm. Strontium was discovered by William Cruickshank in 1787 and first isolated by Humphry Davy in 1808. In its elemental form, strontium is a soft, silvery white metallic solid that quickly turns yellow when exposed to air. Elemental StrontiumCathode ray tubes in televisions are made of strontium, which are becoming increasingly displaced by other display technologies pyrotechnics and fireworks employ strontium salts to achhieve a bright red color. Radioactive isotopes of strontium have been used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and for certain cancer treatments. In nature, most strontium is found in celestite (as strontium sulfate) and strontianite (as strontium carbonate). Strontium was named after the Scottish town where it was discovered.

See more Yttrium products. Yttrium (atomic symbol: Y, atomic number: 39) is a Block D, Group 3, Period 5 element with an atomic weight of 88.90585. Yttrium Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of yttrium's shells is [2, 8, 18, 9, 2] and its electron configuration is [Kr] 4d1 5s2. The yttrium atom has a radius of 180 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 219 pm. Yttrium was discovered by Johann Gadolin in 1794 and first isolated by Carl Gustav Mosander in 1840. In its elemental form, Yttrium has a silvery white metallic appearance. Yttrium has the highest thermodynamic affinity for oxygen of any element. Elemental YttriumYttrium is not found in nature as a free element and is almost always found combined with the lanthanides in rare earth minerals. While not part of the rare earth series, it resembles the heavy rare earths which are sometimes referred to as the "yttrics" for this reason. Another unique characteristic derives from its ability to form crystals with useful properties. The name yttrium originated from a Swedish village near Vaxholm called Yttbery where it was discovered.

See more Zirconium products. Zirconium (atomic symbol: Zr, atomic number: 40) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 5 element with an atomic weight of 91.224. Zirconium Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of Zirconium's shells is 2, 8, 18, 10, 2 and its electron configuration is [Kr] 4d2 5s2. The zirconium atom has a radius of 160 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 186 pm. Zirconium was discovered by Martin Heinrich Klaproth in 1789 and first isolated by Jöns Jakob Berzelius in 1824. In its elemental form, zirconium has a silvery white appearance that is similar to titanium. Zirconium's principal mineral is zircon (zirconium silicate). Elemental ZirconiumZirconium is commercially produced as a byproduct of titanium and tin mining and has many applications as a opacifier and a refractory material. It is not found in nature as a free element. The name of zirconium comes from the mineral zircon, the most important source of zirconium, and from the Persian wordzargun, meaning gold-like.

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October 15, 2018
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