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Titanium-based Molybdenum Zirconium Tin Alloy

Linear Formula:

Ti-Mo-Zr-Sn

ORDER

PRODUCT Product Code ORDER SAFETY DATA TECHNICAL DATA
Ti Mo-11.5% Zr-6% Sn-4.5%
TIMO-ZRSN-01-P.045SN
Pricing > SDS > Data Sheet >

Properties

Compound Formula

Ti11.5Mo6Zr4.5Sn

Appearance

Solid

Melting Point

1573-1690 °C

Boiling Point

N/A

Density

5.06 g/cm3

Tensile Strength

725 MPa (Ultimate)

Thermal Conductivity

6.28 W/m·K

Electrical Resistivity

0.000156 Ω·cm

Specific Heat

0.525 J/g·°C

Health & Safety Info  |  MSDS / SDS

Signal Word N/A
Hazard Statements N/A
Hazard Codes N/A
Transport Information N/A
MSDS / SDS

About

Titanium based Molybdenum Zirconium Tin (Titanium Beta-III, Titanium-Beta 3, Beta-Titanium III) is one of numerous metal alloys sold by American Elements under the trade name AE Alloys™. Primary applications include bearing assembly, ballast, casting, step soldering, and radiation shielding. AE Alloys™ are available in numerous machined shapes such as bar, ingot, ribbon, wire, shot, sheet, and foil, in various dimensions. We can also produce materials to custom specifications by request. Ultra high purity and high purity forms also include metal powder, submicron powder and nanoscale, targets for thin film deposition, and pellets for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) applications. American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards. Typical and custom packaging is available, as is additional research, technical and safety (MSDS) data. Please contact us above for information on specifications, lead time and pricing.

Synonyms

Titanium Beta-III, Titanium-Beta 3, Beta-Titanium III, Titanium Alloy Beta 3

Chemical Identifiers

Linear Formula

Ti-Mo-Zr-Sn

Packaging Specifications

Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Safety Data Sheet (SDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes, and 36,000 lb. tanker trucks.

Related Elements

See more Titanium products. Titanium (atomic symbol: Ti, atomic number: 22) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 47.867. The number of electrons in each of Titanium's shells is [2, 8, 10, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d2 4s2. Titanium Bohr ModelThe titanium atom has a radius of 147 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 187 pm. Titanium was discovered by William Gregor in 1791 and first isolated by Jöns Jakob Berzelius in 1825. In its elemental form, titanium has a silvery grey-white metallic appearance. Titanium's properties are chemically and physically similar to zirconium, both of which have the same number of valence electrons and are in the same group in the periodic table. Elemental TitaniumTitanium has five naturally occurring isotopes: 46Ti through 50Ti, with 48Ti being the most abundant (73.8%). Titanium is found in igneous rocks and the sediments derived from them. It is named after the word Titanos, which is Greek for Titans.

See more Molybdenum products. Molybdenum (atomic symbol: Mo, atomic number: 42) is a Block D, Group 6, Period 5 element with an atomic weight of 95.96. Molybdenum Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of molybdenum's shells is [2, 8, 18, 13, 1] and its electron configuration is [Kr] 4d5 5s1. The molybdenum atom has a radius of 139 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 209 pm. In its elemental form, molybdenum has a gray metallic appearance. Molybdenum was discovered by Carl Wilhelm in 1778 and first isolated by Peter Jacob Hjelm in 1781. Molybdenum is the 54th most abundant element in the earth's crust. Elemental MolybdenumIt has the third highest melting point of any element, exceeded only by tungsten and tantalum. Molybdenum does not occur naturally as a free metal, it is found in various oxidation states in minerals. The primary commercial source of molybdenum is molybdenite, although it is also recovered as a byproduct of copper and tungsten mining. The origin of the name Molybdenum comes from the Greek word molubdos meaning lead.

See more Zirconium products. Zirconium (atomic symbol: Zr, atomic number: 40) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 5 element with an atomic weight of 91.224. Zirconium Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of Zirconium's shells is 2, 8, 18, 10, 2 and its electron configuration is [Kr] 4d2 5s2. The zirconium atom has a radius of 160 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 186 pm. Zirconium was discovered by Martin Heinrich Klaproth in 1789 and first isolated by Jöns Jakob Berzelius in 1824. In its elemental form, zirconium has a silvery white appearance that is similar to titanium. Zirconium's principal mineral is zircon (zirconium silicate). Elemental ZirconiumZirconium is commercially produced as a byproduct of titanium and tin mining and has many applications as a opacifier and a refractory material. It is not found in nature as a free element. The name of zirconium comes from the mineral zircon, the most important source of zirconium, and from the Persian wordzargun, meaning gold-like.

Tin Bohr ModelSee more Tin products. Tin (atomic symbol: Sn, atomic number: 50) is a Block P, Group 14, Period 5 element with an atomic weight of 118.710. The number of electrons in each of tin's shells is 2, 8, 18, 18, 4 and its electron configuration is [Kr] 4d10 5s2 5p2. The tin atom has a radius of 140.5 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 217 pm.In its elemental form, tin has a silvery-gray metallic appearance. It is malleable, ductile and highly crystalline. High Purity (99.9999%) Tin (Sn) MetalTin has nine stable isotopes and 18 unstable isotopes. Under 3.72 degrees Kelvin, Tin becomes a superconductor. Applications for tin include soldering, plating, and such alloys as pewter. The first uses of tin can be dated to the Bronze Age around 3000 BC in which tin and copper were combined to make the alloy bronze. The origin of the word tin comes from the Latin word Stannum which translates to the Anglo-Saxon word tin. For more information on tin, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of tin products, visit the Tin element page.

Recent Research

Tunable resistance switching in solution processed chromium-doped strontium titanate nanoparticles films., Wan, Tao, Qu Bo, Du Haiwei, Lin Xi, Guan Peiyuan, Lin Qianru, Chen Nan, Tan Thiam Teck, Hang Tao, and Chu Dewei , J Colloid Interface Sci, 2017 May 15, Volume 494, p.178-184, (2017)

Tunable pyroelectric properties of barium strontium titanate thin films., Shirokov, V B., Razumnaya A G., and Yuzyuk Yu I. , J Phys Condens Matter, 2017 May 10, Volume 29, Issue 18, p.185701, (2017)

Nucleation and growth process of atomic layer deposition platinum nanoparticles on strontium titanate nanocuboids., Wang, Chuandao, Hu Linhua, Poeppelmeier Kenneth, Stair Peter C., and Marks Laurence , Nanotechnology, 2017 May 05, Volume 28, Issue 18, p.185704, (2017)

Ordered titanium templates functionalized by gold films for biosensing applications - Towards non-enzymatic glucose detection., Grochowska, Katarzyna, Szkoda Mariusz, Karczewski Jakub, Śliwiński Gerard, and Siuzdak Katarzyna , Talanta, 2017 May 01, Volume 166, p.207-214, (2017)

Vacuum arc plasma deposition of thin titanium dioxide films on silicone elastomer as a functional coating for medical applications., Boudot, Cécile, Kühn Marvin, Kühn-Kauffeldt Marina, and Schein Jochen , Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl, 2017 May 01, Volume 74, p.508-514, (2017)

Titanium (IV) ion-modified covalent organic frameworks for specific enrichment of phosphopeptides., Wang, Heping, Jiao Fenglong, Gao Fangyuan, Lv Yayao, Wu Qiong, Zhao Yan, Shen Yehua, Zhang Yangjun, and Qian Xiaohong , Talanta, 2017 May 01, Volume 166, p.133-140, (2017)

Osteo Growth Induction titanium surface treatment reduces ROS production of mesenchymal stem cells increasing their osteogenic commitment., Ghensi, Paolo, Bressan Eriberto, Gardin Chiara, Ferroni Letizia, Ruffato Lucio, Caberlotto Mauro, Soldini Claudio, and Zavan Barbara , Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl, 2017 May 01, Volume 74, p.389-398, (2017)

Formation of novel hydrogel bio-anode by immobilization of biocatalyst in alginate/polyaniline/titanium-dioxide/graphite composites and its electrical performance., Szöllősi, Attila, Hoschke Ágoston, Rezessy-Szabó Judit M., Bujna Erika, Kun Szilárd, and Nguyen Quang D. , Chemosphere, 2017 May, Volume 174, p.58-65, (2017)

Effects of high power ultrasonic vibration on the cold compaction of titanium., Fartashvand, Vahid, Abdullah Amir, and Vanini Seyed Ali Sadoug , Ultrason Sonochem, 2017 May, Volume 36, p.155-161, (2017)

Ultrasound-driven titanium modification with formation of titania based nanofoam surfaces., Zhukova, Yulia, Ulasevich Sviatlana A., Dunlop John W. C., Fratzl Peter, Möhwald Helmuth, and Skorb Ekaterina V. , Ultrason Sonochem, 2017 May, Volume 36, p.146-154, (2017)

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April 24, 2017
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