Skip to Page Content

Lead Oxalate

PbC2O4
CAS 814-93-7

Product Product Code Request Quote
(2N) 99% Lead Oxalate PB-OXL-02 Request Quote
(3N) 99.9% Lead Oxalate PB-OXL-03 Request Quote
(4N) 99.99% Lead Oxalate PB-OXL-04 Request Quote
(5N) 99.999% Lead Oxalate PB-OXL-05 Request Quote

CHEMICAL
IDENTIFIER
Formula CAS No. PubChem SID PubChem CID MDL No. EC No IUPAC Name Beilstein
Re. No.
SMILES
Identifier
InChI
Identifier
InChI
Key
PbC2O4 814-93-7 197481 61218 N/A 212-413-5 lead(2+); oxalate N/A C(=O)(C(=O)[O-])[O-].[Pb+2] InChI=1S/C2H2O4.Pb/c3-1(4)2(5)6;/h(H,3,4)(H,5,6);/q;+2/p-2 FCHAMWMIYDDXFS-UHFFFAOYSA-L

PROPERTIES Compound Formula Mol. Wt. Appearance Melting Point Boiling Point Density Exact Mass Monoisotopic Mass Charge MSDS
C2O4Pb 295.219 White Powder 327.5 °C
(621.5 °F)
1740 °C
(3164 °F)
11.336 g/cm3 295.956 295.956 0 Safety Data Sheet

Oxalate IonLead Oxalate is highly insoluble in water and converts to the oxide when heated (calcined). Lead Oxalate is generally immediately available in most volumes. High purity, submicron and nanopowder forms may be considered. American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards. Typical and custom packaging is available. Additional technical, research and safety (MSDS) information is available as is a Reference Calculator for converting relevant units of measurement.

Lead Bohr Model Lead (Pb) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolLead (atomic symbol: Pb, atomic number: 82) is a Block P, Group 14, Period 6 element with an atomic radius of 207.2. The number of electrons in each of Lead's shells is [2, 8, 18, 32, 18, 4] and its electron configuration is [Xe] 4f14 5d10 6s2 6p2. The lead atom has a radius of 175 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 202 pm. In its elemental form, lead has a metallic gray appearance. Lead occurs naturally as a mixture of four stable isotopes: 204Pb (1.48%), 206Pb (23.6%), 207Pb (22.6%), and 208Pb (52.3%). Elemental Lead Lead is obtained mainly from galena (PbS) by a roasting process. Anglesite, cerussite, and minim are other common lead containing minerals. Lead does occur as a free element in nature, but it is rare. It is a dense, soft metal that is very resistant to corrosion and poorly conductive compared to other metals. Its density and low melting point make it useful in applications such as electrolysis and industrual materials. For more information on lead, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of lead products, visit the Lead element page.

HEALTH, SAFETY & TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION
Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS
Signal Word N/A
Hazard Statements N/A
Hazard Codes N/A
Risk Codes N/A
Safety Precautions N/A
RTECS Number N/A
Transport Information N/A
WGK Germany N/A
Globally Harmonized System of
Classification and Labelling (GHS)
N/A        

LEAD OXALATE SYNONYMS
Ethanedioic acid, lead(2+) salt (1:1)

CUSTOMERS FOR LEAD OXALATE HAVE ALSO LOOKED AT
Lead Foil Lead Silver Alloy Lead Pellets Lead Powder Lead Wire
Lead Nitrate Lead Nanopowder Lead Sputtering Target Lead Metal Lead Oxide
Lead Chloride Tin Lead Silver Alloy Lead Acetylacetonate Lead Acetate Lead Oxide Pellets
Show Me MORE Forms of Lead

PACKAGING SPECIFICATIONS FOR BULK & RESEARCH QUANTITIES
Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.


Have a Question? Ask a Chemical Engineer or Material Scientist
Request an MSDS or Certificate of Analysis

Recent Research & Development for Lead

  • Chemical and Electronic Structure Characterization of Lead Halide Perovskites and Stability Behavior under Different Exposures - a Photoelectron Spectroscopy Investigation. Bertrand Philippe, Byung-Wook Park, Rebecka Lindblad, Johan Oscarsson, Sareh Ahmadi, Erik M. J. Johansson, and Håkan Rensmo. Chem. Mater.: February 14, 2015
  • Perovskite Solar Cells: Beyond Methylammonium Lead Iodide. Pablo P. Boix, Shweta Agarwala, Teck Ming Koh, Nripan Mathews, and Subodh G Mhaisalkar. J. Phys. Chem. Lett.: 42048
  • The in situ synthesis of PbS nanocrystals in polymer thin films from lead(II) xanthate and dithiocarbamate complexes: evidence for size and morphology control. Edward A Lewis, Paul D. McNaughter, Zhongjie Yin, Yiqiang Chen, Jack R. Brent, Selina A. Saah, James Raftery, Johannes A. M. Awudza, M. Azad Malik, Paul O’Brien, and Sarah J. Haigh. Chem. Mater.: February 13, 2015
  • Importance of Orbital Interactions in Determining Electronic Band Structures of Organo-Lead Iodide. Jongseob Kim, Seung-Cheol Lee, Sung-Hoon Lee, and Ki-Ha Hong. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 13, 2015
  • Design of Lead Telluride Based Thermoelectric Materials through Incorporation of Lead Sulfide Inclusions or Ligand Stripping of Nano-Sized Building Blocks. Derak James, Xu Lu, Alexander Chi Nguyen, Donald T. Morelli, and Stephanie L. Brock. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 11, 2015
  • Electric Field Induced Giant Strain and Photoluminescence-Enhancement Effect in Rare-Earth Modified Lead-Free Piezoelectric Ceramics. Qirong Yao, Feifei Wang, Feng Xu, Chung Ming Leung, Tao Wang, Yanxue Tang, Xiang Ye, Yiqun Xie, Dazhi Sun, and Wangzhou Shi. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: February 9, 2015
  • Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Lead-Iodide Perovskite Featuring Zero-Dipole-Moment Guanidinium Cations: A Theoretical Analysis. Giacomo Giorgi, Jun-ichi Fujisawa, Hiroshi Segawa, and Koichi Yamashita. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 5, 2015
  • Lifetime, Mobility, and Diffusion of Photoexcited Carriers in Ligand-ExchangedLead Selenide Nanocrystal Films Measured by Time-Resolved Terahertz Spectroscopy. Glenn W. Guglietta, Benjamin T. Diroll, E. Ashley Gaulding, Julia L. Fordham, Siming Li, Christopher B. Murray, and Jason B. Baxter. ACS Nano: February 2, 2015
  • Methylammonium Lead Bromide Perovskite-Based Solar Cells by Vapor-Assisted Deposition. Rui Sheng, Anita Ho-Baillie, Shujuan Huang, Sheng Chen, Xiaoming Wen, Xiaojing Hao, and Martin A. Green. J. Phys. Chem. C: January 27, 2015
  • Crystallization Kinetics of Organic–Inorganic Trihalide Perovskites and the Role of the Lead Anion in Crystal Growth. David T. Moore, Hiroaki Sai, Kwan W. Tan, Detlef-M. Smilgies, Wei Zhang, Henry J. Snaith, Ulrich Wiesner, and Lara A. Estroff. J. Am. Chem. Soc.: January 27, 2015

Recent Research & Development for Oxalates

  • Unraveling the structure of Iron(III) oxalate tetrahydrate and its reversible Li insertion capability. Hania Ahouari, Gwenaelle Rousse, Juan Jose Rodriguez-Carvajal, Moulay Tahar Sougrati, Matthieu Saubanère, Matthieu Courty, Nadir Recham, and Jean-Marie Tarascon. Chem. Mater.: February 12, 2015
  • The Complexation of Cm(III) with Oxalate in Aqueous Solution at T = 20–90 °C: A Combined TRLFS and Quantum Chemical Study. Andrej Skerencak-Frech, Martin Maiwald, Michael Trumm, Daniel R. Froehlich, and Petra J. Panak. Inorg. Chem.: February 3, 2015
  • Three-Dimensional Architectures of [MnIICrIII(oxalate)3] Complexes with Cage-Type Networks Surrounding Supramolecular Cations. Toru Endo, Kazuya Kubo, Masashi Yoshitake, Shin-ichiro Noro, Norihisa Hoshino, Tomoyuki Akutagawa, and Takayoshi Nakamura. Crystal Growth & Design: January 21, 2015
  • Kinetics Study of Hydrogenation of Dimethyl Oxalate over Cu/SiO2 Catalyst. Siming Li, Yue Wang, Jian Zhang, Shengping Wang, Yan Xu, Yujun Zhao, and Xinbin Ma. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.: January 12, 2015
  • Aspects of the Mechanism of Nucleation and Intergrowth of Gibbsite Crystals on Sodium Oxalate Surfaces in Concentrated Alkaline Solutions. Weng Fu, James Vaughan, and Alistair Gillespie. Crystal Growth & Design: November 21, 2014
  • Closure of the Cytoplasmic Gate Formed by TM5 and TM11 during Transport in the Oxalate/Formate Exchanger from Oxalobacter formigenes. Osigbemhe Iyalomhe, Dawn Z. Herrick, David S. Cafiso, and Peter C. Maloney. Biochemistry: November 19, 2014
  • Aggregation of Calcium Phosphate and Oxalate Phases in the Formation of Renal Stones. Baoquan Xie, Timothy J. Halter, Ballav M. Borah, and George H. Nancollas. Crystal Growth & Design: November 12, 2014
  • Rectangle versus Square Oxalate-Connective Tetralanthanide Cluster Anchored in Lacunary Lindqvist Isopolytungstates: Syntheses, Structures, and Properties. Junwei Zhao, Hailou Li, Yanzhou Li, Chunyang Li, Zhenling Wang, and Lijuan Chen. Crystal Growth & Design: October 3, 2014
  • Formation and Structure of Copper(II) Oxalate Layers on Carboxy-Terminated Self-Assembled Monolayers. I. Schrader, L. Wittig, K. Richter, H. Vieker, A. Beyer, A. Gölzhäuser, A. Hartwig, and P. Swiderek. Langmuir: September 16, 2014
  • Cu Nanoparticles Inlaid Mesoporous Al2O3 As a High-Performance Bifunctional Catalyst for Ethanol Synthesis via Dimethyl Oxalate Hydrogenation. Yifeng Zhu, Xiao Kong, Xianqing Li, Guoqiang Ding, Yulei Zhu, and Yong-Wang Li. ACS Catal.: September 4, 2014