Nickel Cobalt Chromium Nanoparticles

Linear Formula: NiCoCr

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PRODUCT PRODUCT CODE REQUEST A QUOTE SAFETY DATA TECHNICAL DATA
(2N) 99% Nickel Cobalt Chromium Nanoparticles
NI-COCR-02-NP Pricing
(3N) 99.9% Nickel Cobalt Chromium Nanoparticles
NI-COCR-03-NP Pricing
(4N) 99.99% Nickel Cobalt Chromium Nanoparticles
NI-COCR-04-NP Pricing
(5N) 99.999%Nickel Cobalt Chromium Nanoparticles
NI-COCR-05-NP Pricing

Properties

Appearance Powder
Melting Point N/A
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Health & Safety Info  |  MSDS / SDS

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About

High Purity, D50 = +10 nanometer (nm) by SEMNickel Cobalt Chromium (NiCoCr) Nanoparticles, nanodots or nanopowder are spherical or faceted high surface area metal particles. Nanoscale Tin Particles are typically 10-20 nanometers (nm) with specific surface area (SSA) in the 30- 60 m2/g range and also available in with an average particle size of 80 nm range with a specific surface area of approximately 12 m2/g. Nano Tin Particles are also available in Ultra high purity and high purity and coated and dispersed forms. They are also available as a dispersion through the AE Nanofluid production group. Nanofluids are generally defined as suspended nanoparticles in solution either using surfactant or surface charge technology. Nanofluid dispersion and coating selection technical guidance is also available. Other nanostructures include nanorods, nanowhiskers, nanohorns, nanopyramids and other nanocomposites. Surface functionalized nanoparticles allow for the particles to be preferentially adsorbed at the surface interface using chemically bound polymers.

Synonyms

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Chemical Identifiers

Linear Formula NiCoCr
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Packaging Specifications

Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Safety Data Sheet (SDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes, and 36,000 lb. tanker trucks.

Related Products & Element Information

See more Chromium products. Chromium (atomic symbol: Cr, atomic number: 24) is a Block D, Group 6, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 51.9961. Chromium Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of Chromium's shells is 2, 8, 13, 1 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d5 4s1. Chromium was first discovered by Louis Nicolas Vauquelin in 1797. It was first isolated in 1798, also by Louis Nicolas Vauquelin. The chromium atom has a radius of 128 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 189 pm. In its elemental form, chromium has a lustrous steel-gray appearance. Elemental ChromiumChromium is the hardest metal element in the periodic table and the only element that exhibits antiferromagnetic ordering at room temperature, above which it tranforms into a paramagnetic solid. The most common source of chromium is chromite ore (FeCr2O4). Due to its various colorful compounds, Chromium was named after the Greek word 'chroma' meaning color.

See more Cobalt products. Cobalt (atomic symbol: Co, atomic number: 27) is a Block D, Group 9, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 58.933195. Cobalt Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of cobalt's shells is 2, 8, 15, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d7 4s2The cobalt atom has a radius of 125 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 192 pm. Cobalt was first discovered by George Brandt in 1732. In its elemental form, cobalt has a lustrous gray appearance. Cobalt is found in cobaltite, erythrite, glaucodot and skutterudite ores. Elemental CobaltCobalt produces brilliant blue pigments which have been used since ancient times to color paint and glass. Cobalt is a ferromagnetic metal and is used primarily in the production of magnetic and high-strength superalloys. Co-60, a commercially important radioisotope, is useful as a radioactive tracer and gamma ray source. The origin of the word Cobalt comes from the German word "Kobalt" or "Kobold," which translates as "goblin," "elf" or "evil spirit." For more information on cobalt, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of cobalt products, visit the Cobalt element page.

See more Nickel products. Nickel (atomic symbol: Ni, atomic number: 28) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 58.6934. Nickel Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of nickel's shells is [2, 8, 16, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar]3d8 4s2. Nickel was first discovered by Alex Constedt in 1751. The nickel atom has a radius of 124 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 184 pm. In its elemental form, nickel has a lustrous metallic silver appearance. Nickel is a hard and ductile transition metal that is considered corrosion-resistant because of its slow rate of oxidation. Elemental NickelIt is one of four elements that are ferromagnetic and is used in the production of various type of magnets for commercial use. Nickel is sometimes found free in nature but is more commonly found in ores. The bulk of mined nickel comes from laterite and magmatic sulfide ores. The name originates from the German word kupfernickel, which means "false copper" from the illusory copper color of the ore.

Recent Research

Combined nano-biotechnology for in-situ remediation of mixed contamination of groundwater by hexavalent chromium and chlorinated solvents., Němeček, Jan, Pokorný Petr, Lhotský Ondřej, Knytl Vladislav, Najmanová Petra, Steinová Jana, Černík Miroslav, Filipová Alena, Filip Jan, and Cajthaml Tomáš , Sci Total Environ, 2016 Sep 1, Volume 563-564, p.822-34, (2016)

Adverse effects and bioconcentration of chromium in two freshwater rotifer species., Hernández-Ruiz, Esmeralda, Alvarado-Flores Jesús, Rubio-Franchini Isidoro, Ventura-Juárez Javier, and Rico-Martínez Roberto , Chemosphere, 2016 Sep, Volume 158, p.107-15, (2016)

Chromium speciation in tannery effluent after alkaline precipitation: Isolation and characterization., Wang, Dandan, He Shiya, Shan Chao, Ye Yuxuan, Ma Hongrui, Zhang Xiaolin, Zhang Weiming, and Pan Bingcai , J Hazard Mater, 2016 Oct 5, Volume 316, p.169-77, (2016)

Chromium immobilization by extra- and intraradical fungal structures of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses., Wu, Songlin, Zhang Xin, Sun Yuqing, Wu Zhaoxiang, Li Tao, Hu Yajun, Lv Jitao, Li Gang, Zhang Zhensong, Zhang Jing, et al. , J Hazard Mater, 2016 Oct 5, Volume 316, p.34-42, (2016)

Chromate Allergy in Northern Israel in Relation to Exposure to Cement and Detergents., Kridin, Khalaf, Bergman Reuven, Khamaisi Mogher, and Weltfriend Sara , Dermatitis, 2016 May-Jun, Volume 27, Issue 3, p.131-6, (2016)

Effect of NaX zeolite-modified graphite felts on hexavalent chromium removal in biocathode microbial fuel cells., Wu, Xiayuan, Tong Fei, Yong Xiaoyu, Zhou Jun, Zhang Lixiong, Jia Honghua, and Wei Ping , J Hazard Mater, 2016 May 5, Volume 308, p.303-11, (2016)

Enhancement of chromate reduction in soils by surface modified biochar., Mandal, Sanchita, Sarkar Binoy, Bolan Nanthi, Ok Yong Sik, and Naidu Ravi , J Environ Manage, 2016 May 24, (2016)

Bioreduction of Chromate in a Methane-Based Membrane Biofilm Reactor., Lai, Chun-Yu, Zhong Liang, Zhang Yin, Chen Jia-Xian, Wen Li-Lian, Shi Ling-Dong, Sun Yan-Ping, Ma Fang, Rittmann Bruce E., Zhou Chen, et al. , Environ Sci Technol, 2016 May 17, (2016)

Carbothermal synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbon-supported nano zero-valent iron with enhanced stability and activity for hexavalent chromium reduction., Dai, Ying, Hu Yuchen, Jiang Baojiang, Zou Jinlong, Tian Guohui, and Fu Honggang , J Hazard Mater, 2016 May 15, Volume 309, p.249-58, (2016)

[Reduction Kinetics of Cr (VI) in Chromium Contaminated Soil by Nanoscale Zerovalent Iron-copper Bimetallic]., Ma, Shao-yun, Zhu Fang, and Shang Zhi-feng , Huan Jing Ke Xue, 2016 May 15, Volume 37, Issue 5, p.1953-9, (2016)

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