Tin Disc



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Product Code Product Request Quote
SN-M-02-D (2N) 99% Tin Disc Request
SN-M-03-D (3N) 99.9% Tin Disc Request
SN-M-04-D (4N) 99.99% Tin Disc Request
SN-M-05-D (5N) 99.999% Tin Disc Request
SN-M-06-D (6N) 99.9999% Tin Disc Request


American Elements specializes in producing high purity Tin discs with the highest possible densityand smallest possible average grain sizes for use in semiconductor, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) display and optical applications. Our standard disc sizes range from 1" to 8" in diameter and from 2mm to 1/2" thick. We can also provide Discs outside this range. Materials are produced using crystallization, solid state and other ultra high purification processes such as sublimation. American Elements specializes in producing custom compositions for commercial and research applications and for new proprietary technologies. American Elements also casts any of the rare earth metals and most other advanced materials into rod, bar, or plate form, as well as other machined shapes and through other processes such as nanoparticles and in the form of solutions and organometallics. American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards. Typical and custom packaging is available. See safety data and research below and pricing/lead time above. We also produce Tin as rod, pellets, powder, pieces, granules, ingot, wire, and in compound forms, such as oxide. Other shapes are available by request.



Chemical Identifiers

Formula Sn
CAS 7440-31-5
Pubchem CID 5352426
MDL MFCD00133862
EC No. 231-141-8
Beilstein Registry No. N/A
InchI Identifier InChI=1S/Sn


Molecular Weight 118.69
Appearance Yellow
Melting Point 231.93 °C
Boiling Point 2602 °C
Density 7310 kg/m3
Tensile Strength N/A
Thermal Conductivity 0.668 W/cm/K @ 298.2 K
Electronegativity 1.8 Paulings
Specific Heat 0.0510 Cal/g/K @ 25 °C
Heat of Vaporization 70 K-Cal/gm atom at 2270 °C
Heat of Fusion 1.72 Cal/gm mole

Health & Safety Info  |  MSDS / SDS

Signal Word Warning
Hazard Statements H319-H335
Hazard Codes Xi
Risk Codes 36/37
Safety Statements 26
RTECS Number XP7320000
Transport Information N/A
WGK Germany 3
Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling (GHS) N/A

Packaging Specifications

Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.

Related Products

SnSee more Tin products. Tin (atomic symbol: Sn, atomic number: 50) is a Block P, Group 14, Period 5 element with an atomic weight of 118.710. The number of electrons in each of tin's shells is 2, 8, 18, 18, 4 and its electron configuration is [Kr] 4d10 5s2 5p2. The tin atom has a radius of 140.5 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 217 pm.In its elemental form, tin has a silvery-gray metallic appearance. It is malleable, ductile and highly crystalline. Tin has nine stable isotopes and 18 unstable isotopes. Under 3.72 degrees Kelvin, Tin becomes a superconductor. Applications for tin include soldering, plating, and such alloys as pewter. The first uses of tin can be dated to the Bronze Age around 3000 BC in which tin and copper were combined to make the alloy bronze. The origin of the word tin comes from the Latin word Stannum which translates to the Anglo-Saxon word tin. For more information on tin, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of tin products, visit the Tin element page.


Recent Research & Development for Tin

  • Combined Tin-Containing Fluoride Solution and CO2 Laser Treatment Reduces Enamel Erosion in vitro. Esteves-Oliveira M, Witulski N, Hilgers RD, Apel C, Meyer-Lueckel H, de Paula Eduardo C. Caries Res. 9/29/2015
  • Interface Promoted Reversible Mg Insertion in Nanostructured Tin-Antimony Alloys. Cheng Y, Shao Y, Parent LR, Sushko ML, Li G, Sushko PV, Browning ND, Wang C, Liu J. Adv Mater. 9/29/2015
  • Tin-carbon clusters and the onset of microscopic level immiscibility: Experimental and computational study. Bernstein J, Landau A, Zemel E, Kolodney E. J Chem Phys. 9/27/2015
  • Effective Electrochemistry of Human Sulfite Oxidase Immobilized on Quantum-Dots-Modified Indium Tin Oxide Electrode. Zeng T, Leimkühler S, Koetz J, Wollenberger U. ACS Appl Mater Interfaces. 9/26/2015
  • Laser Direct Ablation of Indium Tin Oxide Films on Both Sides of Various Substrates. Oh GT, Kwon SJ, Han JH, Cho ES. J Nanosci Nanotechnol. 9/25/2015
  • Tin sulfide and selenide clusters soluble in organic solvents with the core structures of Sn4S6 and Sn4Se6. Zhong M, Yang Z, Yi Y, Zhang D, Sun K, Roesky HW, Yang Y. Dalton Trans. 9/25/2015
  • Nanolayered tin phosphate: a remarkably selective Cs ion sieve for acidic waste solutions. Huang W, Komarneni S, Aref AR, Noh YD, Ma J, Chen K, Xue D, Jiang B. Chem Commun (Camb). 9/25/2015
  • Indium Tin Oxide Nanoparticles/Vaseline Nanocomposites: Preparation of Nanoelectrode Assembles with Tunable Dimensions. Lin Y, Yin L, Xu Y, Gao Y. J Nanosci Nanotechnol. 9/24/2015
  • Chemical Gated Field Effect Transistor by Hybrid Integration of One-Dimensional Silicon Nanowire and Two-Dimensional Tin Oxide Thin Film for Low Power Gas Sensor. Han JW, Rim T, Baek CK, Meyyappan M. ACS Appl Mater Interfaces. 9/23/2015
  • Application of least squares support vector regression and linear multiple regression for modeling removal of methyl orange onto tin oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon and activated carbon prepared from Pistacia atlantica wood. Ghaedi M, Rahimi MR, Ghaedi AM, Tyagi I, Agarwal S, Gupta VK. J Colloid Interface Sci. 8/12/2015

Free Test Sample Program

We recognize many of our customers are purchasing small quantities directly online as trial samples in anticipation of placing a larger future order or multiple orders as a raw material for production. Since our primary business is the production of industrial quantities and/or highly consistent batches which can be used for commercial production and purchased repeatedly in smaller quantity, American Elements offers trial samples at no charge on the following basis. Within 6 months of purchasing materials directly online from us, you have the option to refer back to that order and advise that it is the intention of your company, institution or lab to either purchase a larger quantity, purchase the material in regular intervals or purchase more on some other basis.

We will then evaluate your future needs and assuming the quantity or number of future purchases qualify, we will fully credit your purchase price with the next order. Because of the many variables in the quantity and number of orders you may place, it is impossible to evaluate whether your future order(s) will qualify for this program prior to your placing your next order. Please know American Elements strongly desires to make this free sample program available to you and will make every effort to do so once your next order is placed.