(2N) 99%  •  (3N) 99.9%  •  (4N) 99.99%  •  (5N) 99.999%  •  (6N) 99.9999%

BROMIDE INFORMATION CENTER

AE Bromides™

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Bromures Bromide Bromuri Brometos Bromuros 溴化物 臭化物 Bromider

32.4 (A)/00.012


  Hydrogen                                 Helium
  Lithium Beryllium                     Boron Carbon Nitrogen Oxygen Fluorine Neon
  Sodium Magnesium                     Aluminum Silicon Phosphorus Sulfur Chlorine Argon
  Potassium Calcium Scandium Titanium Vanadium Chromium Manganese Iron Cobalt Nickel Copper Zinc Gallium Germanium Arsenic Selenium Bromine Krypton
  Rubidium Strontium Yttrium Zirconium Niobium Molybdenum Technetium Ruthenium Rhodium Palladium Silver Cadmium Indium Tin Antimony Tellurium Iodine Xenon
  Cesium Barium Lanthanum Hafnium Tantalum Tungsten Rhenium Osmium Iridium Platinum Gold Mercury Thallium Lead Bismuth Polonium Astatine Radon
  Francium Radium Actinium Rutherfordium Dubnium Seaborgium Bohrium Hassium Meitnerium Darmstadtium Roentgenium Copernicium Ununtrium Flerovium Ununpentium Livermorium Ununseptium Ununoctium
                                     
      Cerium Praseodymium Neodymium Promethium Samarium Europium Gadolinium Terbium Dysprosium Holmium Erbium Thulium Ytterbium Lutetium    
      Thorium Protactinium Uranium Neptunium Plutonium Americium Curium Berkelium Californium Einsteinium Fermium Mendelevium Nobelium Lawerencium    

Bromide IonAmerican Elements is a manufacturer and supplier specializing in the bromide form of most metallic elements including Cerium, Lanthanum, Erbium, Ytterbium, Neodymium, Yttrium and other rare earth elements, Gallium, Hafnium, Scandium, Niobium, Indium, Ruthenium, Zirconium, transition metals such as Copper, Nickel, Tin and Cobalt and precious metals such as Gold, Silver, Platinum and Palladium as well as other advanced elements. These bromide compounds are available as both powders and solutions and marketed under the trademark AE Bromides™.

The bromide form of any metal is generally soluble in water. Bromides are often used when the chloride or nitrate form is hazardous. This has become increasingly the case with the advent of new green chemistry and hazardous materials legislation such as the new REACH program in the European Union. For example, bromides are now being used in many catalytic, electronic, coating and biomedical applications in replacement of other soluble forms for this reason.

Neodymium Bromide (NdBr)Bromide compounds are formed when a metallic cation binds with a charged (- 1) bromine (Br) anion to form a bromide salt of that metal. Bromine is the only liquid halogen. Bromides were first prepared and used as sedatives which is why a "tired" expression or saying is sometimes called a bromide.

Purities include 99%, 99.9%, 99.99%, 99.999% and 99.9999% which are sometimes referred to as 2N, 3N, 4N, 5N and 6N. These products are also available in an ultra dry form.

Physical properties may include nanopowder, nano particle, submicron, - 325 mesh, rod, foil, and high surface area bromide with particle distribution and particle size controlled and certified. We produce larger - 40 mesh, - 100 mesh, -200 mesh range sizes and < 0.5 mm, 2 mm, 5 mm and other mm size shot, granules, lump, flake and pieces, too.

American Elements maintains industrial scale production for all its bromide products.

American Elements will execute Non-Disclosure or Confidentiality Agreements to protect customer know-how.

AE Bromides™ products include:



 
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Production Catalog Available in 36 Countries and Languages

Recent Research & Development for Bromides

  • Mohammadreza Moslemi, Simon H. Davies, Susan J. Masten, Hybrid ozonation–ultrafiltration: The formation of bromate in waters containing natural organic matter, Separation and Purification Technology, Volume 125, 7 April 2014
  • Qi Han, Hongjie Wang, Wenyi Dong, Tongzhou Liu, Yulei Yin, Formation and inhibition of bromate during ferrate(VI) – Ozone oxidation process, Separation and Purification Technology, Volume 118, 30 October 2013
  • Paulo A. Nogueira, Roberto B. Faria, Hamilton Varela, On the failure of sustained oscillations in the bromate/hypophosphite–acetone/dual catalyst flow system, Chemical Physics Letters, Volume 557, 5 February 2013
  • V.M. Abdul Mujeeb, K. Muraleedharan, M.P. Kannan, T. Ganga Devi, Influence of trivalent ion dopants on the thermal decomposition kinetics of potassium bromate, Thermochimica Acta, Volume 525, Issues 1–2, 20 October 2011
  • Ramesh Chitrakar, Akinari Sonoda, Yoji Makita, Takahiro Hirotsu, Synthesis and bromate reduction of sulfate intercalated Fe(II)–Al(III) layered double hydroxides, Separation and Purification Technology, Volume 80, Issue 3, 18 August 2011
  • Jun Li, Jichang Wang, Design of batch minimal bromate oscillator, Chemical Physics Letters, Volume 508, Issues 4–6, 27 May 2011
  • Ramesh Chitrakar, Yoji Makita, Akinari Sonoda, Takahiro Hirotsu, Fe–Al layered double hydroxides in bromate reduction: Synthesis and reactivity, Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, Volume 354, Issue 2, 15 February 2011
  • Karina Listiarini, Jia Tong Tor, Darren D. Sun, James O. Leckie, Hybrid coagulation–nanofiltration membrane for removal of bromate and humic acid in water, Journal of Membrane Science, Volume 365, Issues 1–2, 1 December 2010
  • Ch. Snehalatha Reddy, P.V. Raja Shekar, K. Gopala Kishan Rao, K. Kishan Rao, Growth of large (111) and (1̅1̅1̅) sodium bromate single crystals by Reverse Seeded Solution Growth method, Materials Letters, Volume 64, Issue 5, 15 March 2010
  • Mohammad Harati, Chemical wave in the un-illuminated aminophenol-bromate beads system, Chemical Physics Letters, Volume 477, Issues 1–3, 28 July 2009