Copper Iron Alloy

Cu-Fe

Request Quote

PRODUCT PRODUCT CODE REQUEST A QUOTE PRINT SAFETY DATA
Cu-70% Fe-30% CU-FE-01-P.30FE Request Quote
Cu-96% Fe-4% CU-FE-01-P.04FE Request Quote

Properties

Melting Point N/A
Boiling Point N/A
Density N/A

Health & Safety Info  |  MSDS / SDS

Signal Word N/A
Hazard Statements N/A
Hazard Codes N/A
Risk Codes N/A
Safety Statements N/A
Transport Information N/A
Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling (GHS) N/A
MSDS / SDS

About

Copper Iron is one of numerous metal alloys sold by American Elements under the tradename AE Alloys™. Generally immediately available in most volumes, AE Alloys™ are available as bar, ingot, ribbon, wire, shot, sheet, and foil. Ultra high purity and high purity forms also include metal powder, submicron powder and nanoscale, targets for thin film deposition, and pellets for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) applications. American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards. Typical and custom packaging is available. Primary applications include bearing assembly, ballast, casting, step soldering, and radiation shielding.

Synonyms

N/A

Chemical Identifiers

Formula Cu-Fe
CAS N/A
MDL N/A
EC No. N/A

Packaging Specifications

Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Safety Data Sheet (SDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes, and 36,000 lb. tanker trucks.

Related Products & Element Information

See more Copper products. Copper Bohr Model Copper (atomic symbol: Cu, atomic number: 29) is a Block D, Group 11, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 63.546. The number of electrons in each of copper's shells is 2, 8, 18, 1 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d10 4s1. The copper atom has a radius of 128 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 186 pm. Copper was first discovered by Early Man prior to 9000 BC. In its elemental form, copper has a red-orange metallic luster appearance. Of all pure metals, only silver Elemental Copperhas a higher electrical conductivity.The origin of the word copper comes from the Latin word 'cuprium' which translates as "metal of Cyprus." Cyprus, a Mediterranean island, was known as an ancient source of mined copper.

See more Iron products. Iron (atomic symbol: Fe, atomic number: 26) is a Block D, Group 8, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 55.845. The number of electrons in each of Iron's shells is 2, 8, 14, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d6 4s2. Iron Bohr ModelThe iron atom has a radius of 126 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 194 pm. Iron was discovered by humans before 5000 BC. In its elemental form, iron has a lustrous grayish metallic appearance. Iron is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust and the most common element by mass forming the earth as a whole. Iron is rarely found as a free element, since it tends to oxidize easily; it is usually found in minerals such as magnetite, hematite, goethite, limonite, or siderite.Elemental Iron Though pure iron is typically soft, the addition of carbon creates the alloy known as steel, which is significantly stronger. For more information on iron, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of iron products, visit the Iron element page. .

Recent Research

Intensified removal of copper from waste water using activated watermelon based biosorbent in the presence of ultrasound., Gupta, Harsh, and Gogate Parag R. , Ultrason Sonochem, 2016 May, Volume 30, p.113-22, (2016)

Utilization of reduced graphene oxide/cadmium sulfide-modified carbon cloth for visible-light-prompt photoelectrochemical sensor for copper (II) ions., Foo, C Y., Lim H N., Pandikumar A, Huang N M., and Ng Y H. , J Hazard Mater, 2016 Mar 5, Volume 304, p.400-8, (2016)

Creatinine and urea biosensors based on a novel ammonium ion-selective copper-polyaniline nano-composite., Zhybak, M, Beni V, Vagin M Y., Dempsey E, Turner A P. F., and Korpan Y , Biosens Bioelectron, 2016 Mar 15, Volume 77, p.505-11, (2016)

Layer-by-layer assembly of copper nanoparticles and manganese dioxide-multiwalled carbon nanotubes film: A new nonenzymatic electrochemical sensor for glucose., Wang, Yan, Zhang Sai, Bai Wushuang, and Zheng Jianbin , Talanta, 2016 Mar 1, Volume 149, p.211-6, (2016)

Molecular imprinting method for fabricating novel glucose sensor: Polyvinyl acetate electrode reinforced by MnO2/CuO loaded on graphene oxide nanoparticles., Farid, Mohammad Masoudi, Goudini Leila, Piri Farideh, Zamani Abbasali, and Saadati Fariba , Food Chem, 2016 Mar 1, Volume 194, p.61-7, (2016)

Nanosized spongelike Mn3O4 as an adsorbent for preconcentration by vortex assisted solid phase extraction of copper and lead in various food and herb samples., Yavuz, Emre, Tokalıoğlu Şerife, Şahan Halil, and Patat Şaban , Food Chem, 2016 Mar 1, Volume 194, p.463-9, (2016)

Ultrasound assisted dispersal of a copper nanopowder for electroless copper activation., Graves, John E., Sugden Mark, Litchfield Robert E., Hutt David A., Mason Timothy J., and Cobley Andrew J. , Ultrason Sonochem, 2016 Mar, Volume 29, p.428-38, (2016)

Formation of Bromate and Halogenated Disinfection Byproducts during Chlorination of Bromide-Containing Waters in the Presence of Dissolved Organic Matter and CuO., Liu, Chao, and Croué Jean-Philippe , Environ Sci Technol, 2016 Jan 5, Volume 50, Issue 1, p.135-44, (2016)

An investigation into the use of cuprous chloride for the removal of radioactive iodide from aqueous solutions., Liu, Yang, Gu Ping, Jia Lin, and Zhang Guanghui , J Hazard Mater, 2016 Jan 25, Volume 302, p.82-9, (2016)

Laser sintering of copper nanoparticles on top of silicon substrates., Soltani, A, B Vahed Khorramdel, Mardoukhi A, and Mäntysalo M , Nanotechnology, 2016 Jan 22, Volume 27, Issue 3, p.035203, (2016)