Lanthanum Strontium Cobalt Ferrite (LSCF)

Lanthanum Ferrite doped with Strontium Oxide and Cobalt Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode

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Lanthanum Strontium Cobalt Ferrite (Sr = 10%) Ink LSCF-10-I Request Quote
Lanthanum Strontium Cobalt Ferrite (Sr = 10%) Powder LSCF-10-P Request Quote
Lanthanum Strontium Cobalt Ferrite (Sr = 20%) Powder LSCF-20-P Request Quote
Lanthanum Strontium Cobalt Ferrite Sr = 20%) Ink LSCF-20-I Request Quote

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About

American Elements specializes in producing Lanthanum Strontium Cobalt Ferrite (also known as Lanthanum Strontium Cobalt Ferrite, or LSCF) for fuel cell cathode applications utilizing solid state processing to produce single phase perovskite structures with various doping levels and surface areas (SSA) for use in thin film layers. Lanthanum Strontium Cobalt Ferrite has an excellent thermal expansion match with Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes. It is highly electronically conductive and has proven long term stability. solid oxide fuel cell anode (Nickel Cermet) by SEM Lanthanum Strontium Cobalt Ferrite belongs to a class of "A" site and "B" site doped perovskite structures with these properties. These include Lanthanum Strontium Manganite (LSM), Lanthanum Strontium Ferrite (LSF), Lanthanum Calcium Manganite (LCM), Lanthanum Strontium Chromite (LSC), and Lanthanum Strontium Gallate Magnesite (LSGM). Lanthanum Strontium Cobalt Ferrite is also available as a powder for tape casting, air spray/thermal spray/plasma spray, extrusion and sputtering fuel cell applications and as an ink for screen printing. Strontium doping levels are available at 10% and 20% and as specified by customer. Oxygen starved compositions are available. American Elements provides guidance on firing parameters, doping levels, and thermal expansion matching with American Elements' electrolyte and interconnect fuel cell layers.

Synonyms

Lanthanum Strontium Cobalt Ferrite, LSCF

Packaging Specifications

Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Safety Data Sheet (SDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes, and 36,000 lb. tanker trucks.

Related Products & Element Information

See more Cobalt products. Cobalt (atomic symbol: Co, atomic number: 27) is a Block D, Group 9, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 58.933195. Cobalt Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of cobalt's shells is 2, 8, 15, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d7 4s2The cobalt atom has a radius of 125 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 192 pm. Cobalt was first discovered by George Brandt in 1732. In its elemental form, cobalt has a lustrous gray appearance. Cobalt is found in cobaltite, erythrite, glaucodot and skutterudite ores. Elemental CobaltCobalt produces brilliant blue pigments which have been used since ancient times to color paint and glass. Cobalt is a ferromagnetic metal and is used primarily in the production of magnetic and high-strength superalloys. Co-60, a commercially important radioisotope, is useful as a radioactive tracer and gamma ray source. The origin of the word Cobalt comes from the German word "Kobalt" or "Kobold," which translates as "goblin," "elf" or "evil spirit." For more information on cobalt, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of cobalt products, visit the Cobalt element page.

See more Iron products. Iron (atomic symbol: Fe, atomic number: 26) is a Block D, Group 8, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 55.845. The number of electrons in each of Iron's shells is 2, 8, 14, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d6 4s2. Iron Bohr ModelThe iron atom has a radius of 126 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 194 pm. Iron was discovered by humans before 5000 BC. In its elemental form, iron has a lustrous grayish metallic appearance. Iron is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust and the most common element by mass forming the earth as a whole. Iron is rarely found as a free element, since it tends to oxidize easily; it is usually found in minerals such as magnetite, hematite, goethite, limonite, or siderite.Elemental Iron Though pure iron is typically soft, the addition of carbon creates the alloy known as steel, which is significantly stronger. For more information on iron, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of iron products, visit the Iron element page. .

See more Lanthanum products. Lanthanum (atomic symbol: La, atomic number: 57) is a Block F, Group 3, Period 6 element with an atomic weight of 138.90547. Lanthanum Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of lanthanum's shells is [2, 8, 18, 18, 9, 2] and its electron configuration is [Xe] 5d1 6s2. The lanthanum atom has a radius of 187 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 240 pm. Lanthanum was first discovered by Carl Mosander in 1838. In its elemental form, lanthanum has a silvery white appearance.Elemental Lanthanum It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal that oxidizes easily in air. Lanthanum is the first element in the rare earth or lanthanide series. It is the model for all the other trivalent rare earths and it is the second most abundant of the rare earths after cerium. Lanthanum is found in minerals such as monazite and bastnasite. The name lanthanum originates from the Greek word Lanthaneia, which means 'to lie hidden'.

See more Strontium products. Strontium (atomic symbol: Sr, atomic number: 38) is a Block S, Group 2, Period 5 element with an atomic weight of 87.62 . Strontium Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of Strontium's shells is [2, 8, 18, 8, 2] and its electron configuration is [Kr] 5s2. The strontium atom has a radius of 215 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 249 pm. Strontium was discovered by William Cruickshank in 1787 and first isolated by Humphry Davy in 1808. In its elemental form, strontium is a soft, silvery white metallic solid that quickly turns yellow when exposed to air. Elemental StrontiumCathode ray tubes in televisions are made of strontium, which are becoming increasingly displaced by other display technologies pyrotechnics and fireworks employ strontium salts to achhieve a bright red color. Radioactive isotopes of strontium have been used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and for certain cancer treatments. In nature, most strontium is found in celestite (as strontium sulfate) and strontianite (as strontium carbonate). Strontium was named after the Scottish town where it was discovered.

See more Sulfur products. Sulfur (or Sulphur) (atomic symbol: S, atomic number: 16) is a Block P, Group 16, Period 3 element with an atomic radius of 32.066. Sulfur Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of Sulfur's shells is 2, 8, 6 and its electron configuration is [Ne] 3s2 3p4. In its elemental form, sulfur has a light yellow appearance. The sulfur atom has a covalent radius of 105 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 180 pm. In nature, sulfur can be found in hot springs, meteorites, volcanoes, and as galena, gypsum, and epsom salts. Sulfur has been known since ancient times but was not accepted as an element until 1777, when Antoine Lavoisier helped to convince the scientific community that it was an element and not a compound.

Recent Research

A treatment planning comparison between modulated tri-cobalt-60 teletherapy and linear accelerator-based stereotactic body radiotherapy for central early-stage non-small cell lung cancer., Merna, Catherine, Rwigema Jean-Claude M., Cao Minsong, Wang Pin-Chieh, Kishan Amar U., Michailian Argin, Lamb James, Sheng Ke, Agazaryan Nzhde, Low Daniel A., et al. , Med Dosim, 2016 Spring, Volume 41, Issue 1, p.87-91, (2016)

A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based "Turn-On" nanofluorescence sensor using a nitrogen-doped carbon dot-hexagonal cobalt oxyhydroxide nanosheet architecture and application to α-glucosidase inhibitor screening., Li, Guoliang, Kong Weiheng, Zhao Mei, Lu Shuaimin, Gong Peiwei, Chen Guang, Xia Lian, Wang Hua, You Jinmao, and Wu Yongning , Biosens Bioelectron, 2016 May 15, Volume 79, p.728-35, (2016)

Protein-templated cobaltous phosphate nanocomposites for the highly sensitive and selective detection of platelet-derived growth factor-BB., He, Linghao, Zhang Shuai, Ji Hongfei, Wang Minghua, Peng Donglai, Yan Fufeng, Fang Shaoming, Zhang Hongzhong, Jia Chunxiao, and Zhang Zhihong , Biosens Bioelectron, 2016 May 15, Volume 79, p.553-60, (2016)

Nickel/cobalt oxide-decorated 3D graphene nanocomposite electrode for enhanced electrochemical detection of urea., Nguyen, Nhi Sa, Das Gautam, and Yoon Hyon Hee , Biosens Bioelectron, 2016 Mar 15, Volume 77, p.372-7, (2016)

Ambient temperature operated acetaldehyde vapour detection of spray deposited cobalt doped zinc oxide thin film., Shalini, S, and Balamurugan D , J Colloid Interface Sci, 2016 Mar 15, Volume 466, p.352-9, (2016)

Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles decorated on exfoliated graphene oxide, application for amperometric determination of NADH and H2O2., Ensafi, Ali A., Alinajafi Hossein A., Jafari-Asl M, Rezaei B, and Ghazaei F , Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl, 2016 Mar 1, Volume 60, p.276-84, (2016)

Electrochemical etching of micro-pores in medical grade cobalt-chromium alloy as reservoirs for drug eluting stents., Fuchsberger, Kai, Binder Karoline, Burkhardt Claus, Freudigmann Christian, Herrmann Markus, and Stelzle Martin , J Mater Sci Mater Med, 2016 Mar, Volume 27, Issue 3, p.47, (2016)

Copper and cobalt mobility in soil and accumulation in a metallophyte as influenced by experimental manipulation of soil chemical factors., Lange, Bastien, Pourret Olivier, Meerts Pierre, Jitaru Petru, Cancès Benjamin, Grison Claude, and Faucon Michel-Pierre , Chemosphere, 2016 Mar, Volume 146, p.75-84, (2016)

Analysis of cobalt phosphide (CoP) nanorods designed for non-enzyme glucose detection., Sun, Qiang-Qiang, Wang Min, Bao Shu-Juan, Wang Yu Chen, and Gu Shuang , Analyst, 2016 Jan 7, Volume 141, Issue 1, p.256-60, (2016)