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Nickel Cobalt Chromium Nanoparticles

Ni Co Cr Nanoparticles/Nanopowder

Product Product Code Request Quote
(2N) 99% Nickel Cobalt Chromium Nanoparticles NICOCR-M-02-NP Request Quote
(3N) 99.9% Nickel Cobalt Chromium Nanoparticles NICOCR-M-03-NP Request Quote
(4N) 99.99% Nickel Cobalt Chromium Nanoparticles NICOCR-M-04-NP Request Quote
(5N) 99.999%Nickel Cobalt Chromium Nanoparticles NICOCR-M-05-NP Request Quote

High Purity, D50 = +10 nanometer (nm) by SEMNickel Cobalt Chromium (NiCoCr) Nanoparticles, nanodots or nanopowder are spherical or faceted high surface area metal particles. Nanoscale Tin Particles are typically 10-20 nanometers (nm) with specific surface area (SSA) in the 30 - 60 m 2 /g range and also available in with an average particle size of 80 nm range with a specific surface area of approximately 12 m 2 /g. Nano Tin Particles are also available in Ultra high purity and high purity and coated and dispersed forms. They are also available as a nanofluid through the AE Nanofluid production group. Nanofluids are generally defined as suspended nanoparticles in solution either using surfactant or surface charge technology. Nanofluid dispersion and coating selection technical guidance is also available. Other nanostructures include nanorods, nanowhiskers, nanohorns, nanopyramids and other nanocomposites. Surface functionalized nanoparticles allow for the particles to be preferentially adsorbed at the surface interface using chemically bound polymers.

Nickel (Ni) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolNickel (atomic symbol: Ni, atomic number: 28) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 58.6934. Nickel Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of nickel's shells is [2, 8, 16, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar]3d8 4s2. Nickel was first discovered by Alex Constedt in 1751. The nickel atom has a radius of 124 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 184 pm. In its elemental form, nickel has a lustrous metallic silver appearance. Elemental Nickel Nickel is a hard and ductile transition metal that is considered corrosion-resistant because of its slow rate of oxidation. It is one of four elements that are ferromagnetic and is used in the production of various type of magnets for commercial use. Nickel is sometimes found free in nature but is more commonly found in ores. The bulk of mined nickel comes from laterite and magmatic sulfide ores. The name originates from the German word kupfernickel, which means "false copper" from the illusory copper color of the ore. For more information on nickel, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of nickel products, visit the Nickel element page.


Cobalt (Co) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolCobalt (atomic symbol: Co, atomic number: 27) is a Block D, Group 9, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 58.933195. Cobalt Bohr Model The number of electrons in each of cobalt's shells is 2, 8, 15, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d7 4s2The cobalt atom has a radius of 125 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 192 pm. Cobalt was first discovered by George Brandt in 1732. In its elemental form, cobalt has a lustrous gray appearance. Cobalt is found in cobaltite, erythrite, glaucodot and skutterudite ores. Elemental Cobalt Cobalt produces brilliant blue pigments which have been used since ancient times to color paint and glass. Cobalt is a ferromagnetic metal and is used primarily in the production of magnetic and high-strength superalloys. Co-60, a commercially important radioisotope, is useful as a radioactive tracer and gamma ray source. The origin of the word Cobalt comes from the German word "Kobalt" or "Kobold," which translates as "goblin," "elf" or "evil spirit." For more information on cobalt, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of cobalt products, visit the Cobalt element page.


Chromium (Cr) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolChromium (atomic symbol: Cr, atomic number: 24) is a Block D, Group 6, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 51.9961. Chromium Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of Chromium's shells is 2, 8, 13, 1 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d5 4s1. Chromium was first discovered by Louis Nicolas Vauquelin in 1797. It was first isolated in 1798, also by Louis Nicolas Vauquelin. The chromium atom has a radius of 128 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 189 pm. In its elemental form, chromium has a lustrous steel-gray appearance. Elemental ChromiumChromium is the hardest metal element in the periodic table and the only element that exhibits antiferromagnetic ordering at room temperature, above which it tranforms into a paramagnetic solid. The most common source of chromium is chromite ore (FeCr2O4). Due to its various colorful compounds, Chromium was named after the Greek word 'chroma' meaning color. For more information on chromium, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of chromium products, visit the Chromium element page.



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PACKAGING SPECIFICATIONS FOR BULK & RESEARCH QUANTITIES
Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.


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Recent Research & Development for Nickel

  • Association Model for Nickel and Vanadium with Asphaltene during Solvent Deasphalting. Chuanbo Yu, Linzhou Zhang, Xiuying Guo, Zhiming Xu, Xuewen Sun, Chunming Xu, and Suoqi Zhao. Energy Fuels: February 12, 2015
  • Coke Minimization during Conversion of Biogas to Syngas by Bimetallic Tungsten-Nickel Incorporated Mesoporous Alumina Synthesized by the One-Pot Route. Huseyin Arbag, Sena Yasyerli, Nail Yasyerli, Gulsen Dogu, Timur Dogu, Ilja Gasan Osojnik Crnivec, and Albin Pintar. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.: February 12, 2015
  • Cleavage of lignin-derived 4-O-5 aryl ethers over nickel nanoparticles supported on niobic acid-activated carbon composites. Shaohua Jin, Zihui Xiao, Xiao Chen, Lei Wang, Jin Guo, Miao Zhang, and Changhai Liang. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.: February 10, 2015
  • Visible Light Mediated Cyclization of Tertiary Anilines with Maleimides Using Nickel(II) Oxide Surface-Modified Titanium Dioxide Catalyst. Jian Tang, Günter Grampp, Yun Liu, Bing-Xiang Wang, Fei-Fei Tao, Li-Jun Wang, Xue-Zheng Liang, Hui-Quan Xiao, and Yong-Miao Shen. J. Org. Chem.: February 2, 2015
  • Enhancement of Nitrite and Nitrate Electrocatalytic Reduction through the Employment of Self-Assembled Layers of Nickel- and Copper-Substituted Crown-Type Heteropolyanions. Shahzad Imar, Chiara Maccato, Calum Dickinson, et. al. Langmuir: February 2, 2015
  • Selective N-Methylation of Aliphatic Amines with CO2 and Hydrosilanes Using Nickel-Phosphine Catalysts. Lucero González-Sebastián, Marcos Flores-Alamo, and Juventino J. García. Organometallics: January 30, 2015
  • Structural and Chemical Evolution of Amorphous Nickel Iron Complex Hydroxide upon Lithiation/Delithiation. Kai-Yang Niu, Feng Lin, Liang Fang, Dennis Nordlund, Runzhe Tao, Tsu-Chien Weng, Marca Doeff, and Haimei Zheng. Chem. Mater.: January 27, 2015
  • Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Ethylene Reaction on Nickel (111) Surface. Rizal Arifin, Yasushi Shibuta, Kohei Shimamura, Fuyuki Shimojo, and Shu Yamaguchi. J. Phys. Chem. C: January 23, 2015
  • Synthesis, Structure, and Solution Dynamic Behavior of Nickel Complexes Bearing a 1,3-Diallyl-Substituted NHC Ligand. Agata Wodarska, Andrzej Kozio, Maciej Dranka, Adam Gryff-Keller, Przemysaw Szczeciski, Jakub Jurkowski, and Antoni Pietrzykowski. Organometallics: January 22, 2015
  • Synthesis and Characterization of Ferrocene-Chelating Heteroscorpionate Complexes of Nickel(II) and Zinc(II). Mark Abubekerov and Paula L. Diaconescu. Inorg. Chem.: January 21, 2015

Recent Research & Development for Cobalt

  • High-Performance Oxygen Redox Catalysis with Multifunctional Cobalt Oxide Nanochains: Morphology Dependent Activity. Prashanth W. Menezes, Arindam Indra, Diego González-Flores, Nastaran Ranjbar Sahraie, Ivelina Zaharieva, Michael Schwarze, Peter Strasser, Holger Dau, and Matthias Driess. ACS Catal.: February 16, 2015
  • Light-Activated Protein Inhibition through Photoinduced Electron Transfer of a Ruthenium(II)-Cobalt(III) Bimetallic Complex. Robert J. Holbrook, David J. Weinberg, Mark D. Peterson, Emily A. Weiss, and Thomas J. Meade. J. Am. Chem. Soc.: February 11, 2015
  • In situ CobaltCobalt Oxide/N-Doped Carbon Hybrids As Superior Bifunctional Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen and Oxygen Evolution. Haiyan Jin, Jing Wang, Diefeng Su, Zhongzhe Wei, Zhenfeng Pang, and Yong Wang. J. Am. Chem. Soc.: February 6, 2015
  • Cobalt-Embedded Nitrogen Doped Carbon Nanotubes: A Bifunctional Catalyst for Oxygen Electrode Reactions in a Wide pH Range. Zilong Wang, Shuang Xiao, Zonglong Zhu, Xia Long, Xiaoli Zheng, Xihong Lu, and Shihe Yang. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: February 4, 2015
  • Carbon Dioxide/Epoxide Copolymerization via a Nanosized ZincCobalt(III) Double Metal Cyanide Complex: Substituent Effects of Epoxides on Polycarbonate Selectivity, Regioselectivity and Glass Transition Temperatures. Xing-Hong Zhang, Ren-Jian Wei, Ying?Ying Zhang, Bin-Yang Du, and Zhi-Qiang Fan. Macromolecules: January 29, 2015
  • Germanium Anode with Excellent Lithium Storage Performance in a Germanium/Lithium–Cobalt Oxide Lithium-Ion Battery. Xiuwan Li, Zhibo Yang, Yujun Fu, Li Qiao, Dan Li, Hongwei Yue, and Deyan He. ACS Nano: January 28, 2015
  • Global Mining Risk Footprint of Critical Metals Necessary for Low-Carbon Technologies: The Case of Neodymium, Cobalt, and Platinum in Japan. Keisuke Nansai, Kenichi Nakajima, Shigemi Kagawa, Yasushi Kondo, Yosuke Shigetomi, and Sangwon Suh. Environ. Sci. Technol.: 42030
  • Much Enhanced Catalytic Reactivity of Cobalt Chlorin Derivatives on Two-Electron Reduction of Dioxygen to Produce Hydrogen Peroxide. Kentaro Mase, Kei Ohkubo, and Shunichi Fukuzumi. Inorg. Chem.: January 22, 2015
  • Highly Active and Stable Hybrid Catalyst of Cobalt-Doped FeS2 Nanosheets–Carbon Nanotubes for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction. Di-Yan Wang, Ming Gong, Hung-Lung Chou, Chun-Jern Pan, Hsin-An Chen, Yingpeng Wu, Meng-Chang Lin, Mingyun Guan, Jiang Yang, Chun-Wei Chen, Yuh-Lin Wang, Bing-Joe Hwang, Chia-Chun Chen, and Hongjie Dai. J. Am. Chem. Soc.: January 14, 2015
  • Covalent Entrapment of Cobalt–Iron Sulfides in N-Doped Mesoporous Carbon: Extraordinary Bifunctional Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction and Evolution Reactions. Mengxia Shen, Changping Ruan, Yan Chen, Chunhuan Jiang, Kelong Ai, and Lehui Lu. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: December 22, 2014

Recent Research & Development for Chromium

  • Synthesis and Catalytic Hydrogenation Reactivity of a Chromium Catecholate Porous Organic Polymer. Jeffrey Camacho-Bunquin, Nathan A. Siladke, Guanghui Zhang, Jens Niklas, Oleg G. Poluektov, SonBinh T. Nguyen, Jeffrey T. Miller, and Adam S. Hock. Organometallics: February 16, 2015
  • Thin Films of Molybdenum Disulfide Doped with Chromium by Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (AACVD). David J. Lewis, Aleksander A. Tedstone, Xiang Li Zhong, Edward A. Lewis, Aidan Rooney, Nicky Savjani, Jack R. Brent, Sarah J. Haigh, M. Grace Burke, Christopher A. Muryn, James M. Raftery, Chris Warrens, Kevin West, Sander Gaemers, and Paul O’Brien. Chem. Mater.: January 31, 2015
  • Combined Effect of Sunflower Stem Carbon–Calcium Alginate Beads for the Removal and Recovery of Chromium from Contaminated Water in Column Mode. Monika Jain, V.K. Garg, Krishna Kadirvelu, and Mika Sillanpää. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.: January 14, 2015
  • Preparation of Mesoporous Chromium Promoted Magnetite Based Catalysts for High Temperature Water Gas Shift Reaction. Fereshteh Meshkani , Mehran Rezaei. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.: January 14, 2015
  • Microarray-Based Analysis of Gene Expression in Lycopersicon esculentum Seedling Roots in Response to Cadmium, Chromium, Mercury, and Lead. Jing Hou, Xinhui Liu, Juan Wang, Shengnan Zhao, and Baoshan Cui. Environ. Sci. Technol.: January 6, 2015
  • Two-Dimensional Titanium Carbide for Efficiently Reductive Removal of Highly Toxic Chromium(VI) from Water. Yulong Ying, Yu Liu, Xinyu Wang, Yiyin Mao, Wei Cao, Pan Hu, and Xinsheng Peng. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 5, 2015
  • Temperature Dependent EXAFS Study of Chromium-Doped GaFeO3 at Gallium and Iron Edges. S. Basu, Ripandeep Singh, A. Das, T. Roy, A. Chakrabarti, A. K. Nigam, S. N. Jha, and D. Bhattacharyya. J. Phys. Chem. C: December 24, 2014
  • Formation of an Endoperoxide upon Chromium-Catalyzed Allylic Oxidation of a Triterpene by Oxygen. Abbie Chung, Matthew R. Miner, Kathleen J. Richert, Curtis J. Rieder, and K. A. Woerpel. J. Org. Chem.: November 13, 2014
  • From Chromium–ChromiumQuintuple Bonds to Molecular Squares and Porous Coordination Polymers. Awal Noor, Emmanuel Sobgwi Tamne, Benjamin Oelkers, Tobias Bauer, Serhiy Demeshko, Franc Meyer, Frank W. Heinemann, and Rhett Kempe. Inorg. Chem.: November 10, 2014
  • Chemical Bonding in a Linear Chromium Metal String Complex. Lai-Chin Wu, Maja K. Thomsen, Solveig R. Madsen, Mette Schmoekel, Mads R. V. Jørgensen, Ming-Chuan Cheng, Shie-Ming Peng, Yu-Sheng Chen, Jacob Overgaard, and Bo B. Iversen. Inorg. Chem.: November 10, 2014