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Titanium Platinum Powder

Linear Formula:

Ti-Pt

ORDER

PRODUCT Product Code ORDER SAFETY DATA TECHNICAL DATA
Titanium-Platinum Alloy Powder
TI-PT-01-P
Pricing > SDS > Data Sheet >

Titanium Platinum Powder Properties (Theoretical)

Appearance Metallic Powder
Melting Point N/A
Boiling Point N/A
Density N/A

Titanium Platinum Powder Health & Safety Information

Signal Word N/A
Hazard Statements N/A
Hazard Codes N/A
Transport Information N/A
MSDS / SDS

About Titanium Platinum Powder

American Elements manufactures high performance water and gas atomized Titanium Platinum Powder optimized for additive manufacturing (3D printing, rapid prototyping). Our spherical free-flowing metal powders are engineered to be agglomerate-free with extremely low oxygen and carbon content, consistent micro-structure and tightly controlled morphology and particle size distributions which enable the production of large complex structures without sacrificing the material’s integrity. In addition to our extensive catalog of stock metals and alloys, we also manufacture custom alloy powders with novel compositions in support of developing innovations in the field of additive manufacturing.

Our rigorous quality assurance/quality control testing combined with our proficiency in formulation and process development translates into increased speed to market for our customers. As a trusted world leader in advanced atomized metal powders and custom material solutions, American Elements has the technical expertise to provide guidance in the selection of the most appropriate materials and production technologies for the unique requirements of our customers in the aerospace, medical devices, electronics, lighting and a growing list of other industries.

Titanium Platinum Powder Synonyms

Ti-Pt

Chemical Identifiers

Linear Formula Ti-Pt
MDL Number N/A
EC No. N/A

Packaging Specifications

Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Safety Data Sheet (SDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes, and 36,000 lb. tanker trucks.

Related Elements

See more Platinum products. Platinum (atomic symbol: Pt, atomic number: 78) is a Block D, Group 10, Period 6 element with an atomic weight of 195.084. The number of electrons in each of platinum's shells is [2, 8, 18, 32, 17, 1] and its electron configuration is [Xe] 4f14 5d9 6s1. The platinum atom has a radius of 139 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 175 pm. Platinum Bohr ModelElemental PlatinumPlatinum was discovered and first isolated by Antonio de Ulloa in 1735. It is one of the rarest elements in the earth's crust, occurring at a concentration of only 0.005 ppm. Platinum is found uncombined as a free element and alloyed with iridium as platiniridium. In its elemental form, platinum has a grayish white appearance. It is highly resistant to corrosion: the metal does not oxidize in air at any temperature. It is generally non-reactive, even at high temperatures. The origin of the name "platinum" comes from the Spanish word platina, meaning silver.

See more Titanium products. Titanium (atomic symbol: Ti, atomic number: 22) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 47.867. The number of electrons in each of Titanium's shells is [2, 8, 10, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d2 4s2. Titanium Bohr ModelThe titanium atom has a radius of 147 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 187 pm. Titanium was discovered by William Gregor in 1791 and first isolated by Jöns Jakob Berzelius in 1825. In its elemental form, titanium has a silvery grey-white metallic appearance. Titanium's properties are chemically and physically similar to zirconium, both of which have the same number of valence electrons and are in the same group in the periodic table. Elemental TitaniumTitanium has five naturally occurring isotopes: 46Ti through 50Ti, with 48Ti being the most abundant (73.8%). Titanium is found in igneous rocks and the sediments derived from them. It is named after the word Titanos, which is Greek for Titans.

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January 19, 2019
Los Angeles, CA
Each business day American Elements' scientists & engineers post their choice for the most exciting materials science news of the day

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