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Cobalt Chromium Tungsten Nickel Iron Manganese Foil

Linear Formula:

Co-Cr-W-Ni-Fe-Mn

ORDER

PRODUCT Product Code ORDER SAFETY DATA TECHNICAL DATA
Cobalt Chromium Tungsten Nickel Iron Manganese Foil
COCRW-NIFEMN-01-F
Pricing > SDS > Data Sheet >

Cobalt Chromium Tungsten Nickel Iron Manganese Foil Properties

Compound Formula Co-Cr-W-Ni-Fe-Mn
Appearance Metallic Foil
Melting Point 1330-1410 °C
Boiling Point N/A
Density (Theoretical) 9.27 g/cm3
Electrical Resistivity 8.864 × 10-5 Ω-cm
Specific Heat 0.385 J/g-°C (21 °C)
Tensile Strength 466 MPa (yield)
Thermal Expansion 13.0 µm/m-°C (93.9 °C, 200 °F)

Cobalt Chromium Tungsten Nickel Iron Manganese Foil Health & Safety Information

Signal Word N/A
Hazard Statements N/A
Hazard Codes N/A
Transport Information N/A
MSDS / SDS

About Cobalt Chromium Tungsten Nickel Iron Manganese Foil

Cobalt Chromium Tungsten Nickel Iron Manganese Foil is generally immediately available in most volumes, including bulk quantities. American Elements can produce most materials in high purity and ultra high purity (up to 99.99999%) forms and follows applicable ASTM testing standards; a range of grades are available including Mil Spec (military grade), ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade, Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade, Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia). We can also produce materials to custom specifications by request, in addition to custom compositions for commercial and research applications and new proprietary technologies. Typical and custom packaging is available, as is additional research, technical and safety (MSDS) data. Please contact us above for information on specifications, lead time and pricing.

Cobalt Chromium Tungsten Nickel Iron Manganese Foil Synonyms

Haynes 188, Alloy L-605, UNS R30605, AMS 5537, 5759, 5796, 5797

Chemical Identifiers

Linear Formula Co-Cr-W-Ni-Fe-Mn
MDL Number N/A
EC No. N/A

Packaging Specifications

Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Safety Data Sheet (SDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes, and 36,000 lb. tanker trucks.

Related Elements

See more Chromium products. Chromium (atomic symbol: Cr, atomic number: 24) is a Block D, Group 6, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 51.9961. Chromium Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of Chromium's shells is 2, 8, 13, 1 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d5 4s1. Chromium was first discovered by Louis Nicolas Vauquelin in 1797. It was first isolated in 1798, also by Louis Nicolas Vauquelin. The chromium atom has a radius of 128 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 189 pm. In its elemental form, chromium has a lustrous steel-gray appearance. Elemental ChromiumChromium is the hardest metal element in the periodic table and the only element that exhibits antiferromagnetic ordering at room temperature, above which it tranforms into a paramagnetic solid. The most common source of chromium is chromite ore (FeCr2O4). Due to its various colorful compounds, Chromium was named after the Greek word 'chroma' meaning color.

See more Cobalt products. Cobalt (atomic symbol: Co, atomic number: 27) is a Block D, Group 9, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 58.933195. Cobalt Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of cobalt's shells is 2, 8, 15, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d7 4s2The cobalt atom has a radius of 125 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 192 pm. Cobalt was first discovered by George Brandt in 1732. In its elemental form, cobalt has a lustrous gray appearance. Cobalt is found in cobaltite, erythrite, glaucodot and skutterudite ores. Elemental CobaltCobalt produces brilliant blue pigments which have been used since ancient times to color paint and glass. Cobalt is a ferromagnetic metal and is used primarily in the production of magnetic and high-strength superalloys. Co-60, a commercially important radioisotope, is useful as a radioactive tracer and gamma ray source. The origin of the word Cobalt comes from the German word "Kobalt" or "Kobold," which translates as "goblin," "elf" or "evil spirit." For more information on cobalt, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of cobalt products, visit the Cobalt element page.

See more Iron products. Iron (atomic symbol: Fe, atomic number: 26) is a Block D, Group 8, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 55.845. The number of electrons in each of Iron's shells is 2, 8, 14, 2 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d6 4s2. Iron Bohr ModelThe iron atom has a radius of 126 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 194 pm. Iron was discovered by humans before 5000 BC. In its elemental form, iron has a lustrous grayish metallic appearance. Iron is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust and the most common element by mass forming the earth as a whole. Iron is rarely found as a free element, since it tends to oxidize easily; it is usually found in minerals such as magnetite, hematite, goethite, limonite, or siderite.Elemental Iron Though pure iron is typically soft, the addition of carbon creates the alloy known as steel, which is significantly stronger.

See more Manganese products. Manganese (atomic symbol: Mn, atomic number: 25) is a Block D, Group 7, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 54.938045. Manganese Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of Manganese's shells is [2, 8, 13, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d5 4s2. The manganese atom has a radius of 127 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 197 pm. Manganese was first discovered by Torbern Olof Bergman in 1770 and first isolated by Johann Gottlieb Gahn in 1774. In its elemental form, manganese has a silvery metallic appearance. Elemental ManganeseIt is a paramagnetic metal that oxidizes easily in addition to being very hard and brittle. Manganese is found as a free element in nature and also in the minerals pyrolusite, braunite, psilomelane, and rhodochrosite. The name Manganese originates from the Latin word mangnes, meaning "magnet."

See more Nickel products. Nickel (atomic symbol: Ni, atomic number: 28) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 58.6934. Nickel Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of nickel's shells is [2, 8, 16, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar]3d8 4s2. Nickel was first discovered by Alex Constedt in 1751. The nickel atom has a radius of 124 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 184 pm. In its elemental form, nickel has a lustrous metallic silver appearance. Nickel is a hard and ductile transition metal that is considered corrosion-resistant because of its slow rate of oxidation. Elemental NickelIt is one of four elements that are ferromagnetic and is used in the production of various type of magnets for commercial use. Nickel is sometimes found free in nature but is more commonly found in ores. The bulk of mined nickel comes from laterite and magmatic sulfide ores. The name originates from the German word kupfernickel, which means "false copper" from the illusory copper color of the ore.

See more Tungsten products. Tungsten (atomic symbol: W, atomic number: 74) is a Block D, Group 6, Period 6 element with an atomic weight of 183.84. The number of electrons in each of tungsten's shells is [2, 8, 18, 32, 12, 2] and its electron configuration is [Xe] 4f14 5d4 6s2. Tungsten Bohr ModelThe tungsten atom has a radius of 139 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 210 pm. Tungsten was discovered by Torbern Bergman in 1781 and first isolated by Juan José Elhuyar and Fausto Elhuyar in 1783. In its elemental form, tungsten has a grayish white, lustrous appearance. Elemental TungstenTungsten has the highest melting point of all the metallic elements and a density comparable to that or uranium or gold and about 1.7 times that of lead. Tungsten alloys are often used to make filaments and targets of x-ray tubes. It is found in the minerals scheelite (CaWO4) and wolframite [(Fe,Mn)WO4]. In reference to its density, Tungsten gets its name from the Swedish words tung and sten, meaning heavy stone.

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