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Lead Magnesium Niobate/Lead Titanate

Piezoelectric PMNT Substrate

Linear Formula:

(1-x)[Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]-x[PbTiO3]

ORDER

PRODUCT Product Code ORDER SAFETY DATA TECHNICAL DATA
Lead Magnesium Niobate/Lead Titanate Powder
PMN-PBT-01-P
Pricing > SDS > Data Sheet >
Lead Magnesium Niobate/Lead Titanate Single Crystal
PMN-PBT-01-SX
Pricing > SDS > Data Sheet >

Lead Magnesium Niobate/Lead Titanate Properties (Theoretical)

Appearance Solid
Melting Point N/A
Boiling Point N/A
Density N/A

Lead Magnesium Niobate/Lead Titanate Health & Safety Information

Signal Word N/A
Hazard Statements N/A
Hazard Codes N/A
Risk Codes N/A
Safety Statements N/A
Transport Information N/A

View and Print SDS

SAFETY DATA SHEET

Date Created: 5/15/2015
Date Revised: 5/15/2015

SECTION 1. IDENTIFICATION

Product Name: Lead Magnesium Niobate/Lead Titanate

Product Number: All applicable American Elements product codes, e.g. PMN-PBT-01-SX, PMN-PBT-01-P

Relevant identified uses of the substance: Scientific research and development


SECTION 2. HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION

MECHANICAL PROCESSING OF PMN-PT PRODUCT MAY RESULT IN
TOXIC FINE POWDER OR DUST.
Potential Health Effects Resulting from Fine Powder or Dust:
Inhalation: The respiratory system may
be irritated and both acute
and chronic effects can result.
Ingestion: Powder or dust swallowed or
contained in the upper
respiratory tract through
multiple methods (food,
tobacco, fingers, etc.) can
have acute and chronic
effects on blood and kidney
functions.
Skin Contact: May cause irritation to skin
Eye Contact: May cause irritation to eyes


SECTION 3. COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS

Composition and Ingredient Information*:
Material CAS Number
Lead Monoxide (PbO)** 1317-36-8
Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) 13463-67-7
Niobium Pentoxide (Nb2O5) 1313-96-8
Magnesium Oxide (MgO) 1309-48-4
*Specific percentages of Materials withheld due to a trade secret claim.
**SARA Section 313 Supplier Notification: This product contains chemicals noted that are subject to the reporting requirements of Section 313 of the EMERGENCY PLANNING AND COMMUNITY RIGHTTO-KNOW ACT OF 1986 AND OF 40 CFR 372.


SECTION 4. FIRST AID MEASURES

Inhalation: Remove from exposure and seek medical attention
if experiencing effects from acute overexposure to
lead.
Ingestion: Induce vomiting in a conscious individual and seek
immediate medical attention.
Skin Contact: Wash skin with soap and water.
Skin Absorption: N/A
Eye Contact: Flush eyes well for 15 minutes, lifting the lower and
upper eyelids occasionally. Seek immediate medical
attention


SECTION 5. FIREFIGHTING MEASURES

Flammability:
NFPA Flammability Rating = 0
Extinguishing Media = Water, CO2, and Dry Chemicals
Unusual Fire Hazard:
Product emits toxic fumes under fire conditions and can react quickly with strong
oxidizing agents.
Fire Fighting Precautions:
Self-contained breathing apparatus, full face piece, and full body protective clothing
strongly recommended.


SECTION 6. ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES

Waste Disposal:
Disposal of waste obtained through mechanical processing of the PMN-PT material must
be handled in according to local, state, and federal regulations of hazardous material.


SECTION 7. HANDLING AND STORAGE

Processing of Material:
Wet mechanical processing of the PMN-PT material with incorporation of water cooling
to minimize dust exposure is recommended. The PMN-PT material is intended for use
only in industrial applications.
Proper handling practices include:
- Proper PPE equipment utilized (Gloves, masks, safety glasses)
- Wash thoroughly after handling product or in contact areas where the product
is stored or processed
- Keep materials away from food, food products, and children
- Do not reuse containers
- Do not wear any clothing home that may have come into contact with this
material.


SECTION 8. EXPOSURE CONTROLS/PERSONAL PROTECTION

Personal Protection Equipment
Respirator Dust / Fume respirator compliant to NIOSH/WSHA when handling material.
Protective Gloves Chemical resistant gloves recommended.
Eye Protection Safety goggles recommended.
Other Clothing and Equipment Personal clothing should be protected against
contamination
Processing Controls:
- If operations generate dust, ventilation must be used to keep exposure to
contaminants to a minimum.
- Ventilation should be in accordance with OSHA, industry, state, local, and
federal regulations.


SECTION 9. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

Appearance: Yellow/Green/Brown
Odor: Odorless
Melting Point: 1300 to 1320C
Molecular Weight: 310 - 330
Specific Gravity: 8.0 - 8.2
Decomposition Temp: 700C


SECTION 10. STABILITY AND REACTIVITY

Reactivity: Reacts with Hydrochloric Acid
Chemical Stability: Stable to 700C
Conditions to Avoid: Dry Mechanical Processing
Hazardous Polymerization: N/A


SECTION 11. TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Routes of Exposure:
Eyes, mouth, and inhalation of the dust or powder
Effects from Acute Overexposure:
Lead poisoning with possible symptoms of abdominal pain, confusion, headache, fatigue,
and various others. Severe symptoms can result in convulsions, stupor, and
encephalopathy. Niobium Pentoxide may irritate the mucus membranes and skin.
Effects from Chronic Overexposure:
Normal adult metabolism can handle and mitigate ingestion of lead from the air, food,
and beverages until a certain level of toxicity is attained due to the cumulative toxic
effect of lead. Early symptoms of lead poisoning can include loss of appetite, intermittent
abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea, constipation, and muscle pain. Magnesium compounds
may cause metal fume fever of which symptoms are similar to those of common
influenza.


SECTION 12. ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION

No data available.


SECTION 13. DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS

Waste Disposal:
Disposal of waste obtained through mechanical processing of the PMN-PT material must
be handled in according to local, state, and federal regulations of hazardous material.


SECTION 14. TRANSPORT INFORMATION

Not considered hazardous for transport in this form.


SECTION 15. REGULATORY INFORMATION

Lead, silver and chromium compounds are reportable chemicals under Section 313 of the Emergency Planning
and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 (SARA Title III).


16. OTHER INFORMATION

Safety Data Sheet according to Regulation (EC) No. 1907/2006 (REACH). The above information is believed to be correct but does not purport to be all inclusive and shall be used only as a guide. The information in this document is based on the present state of our knowledge and is applicable to the product with regard to appropriate safety precautions. It does not represent any guarantee of the properties of the product. American Elements shall not be held liable for any damage resulting from handling or from contact with the above product. See reverse side of invoice or packing slip for additional terms and conditions of sale. COPYRIGHT 1997-2016 AMERICAN ELEMENTS. LICENSED GRANTED TO MAKE UNLIMITED PAPER COPIES FOR INTERNAL USE ONLY.

About Lead Magnesium Niobate/Lead Titanate

Lead Magnesium Niobate/Lead Titanate (PMN-PT) is a piezoelectric solid-solution of lead magnesium niobate and lead titanate. PMN-PT single crystals are available in various dimensions and shapes such as plate, disc, and wafer, in addition to powder. American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards. Typical and custom packaging is available. Additional technical, research and safety (MSDS) information is available as is a Reference Calculator for converting relevant units of measurement. Please follow the Contact links above to request a quote, and indicate the quantity and any specifications you require.

Lead Magnesium Niobate/Lead Titanate Synonyms

PMNT, PMN-PT, lead magnesium niobate / lead titanate solid solution, Lead Magnesium Niobate-Lead Titanate

Chemical Identifiers

Linear Formula (1-x)[Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]-x[PbTiO3]
MDL Number N/A
EC No. N/A

Packaging Specifications

Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Safety Data Sheet (SDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes, and 36,000 lb. tanker trucks.

Related Elements

Lead Bohr ModelSee more Lead products. Lead (atomic symbol: Pb, atomic number: 82) is a Block P, Group 14, Period 6 element with an atomic radius of 207.2. The number of electrons in each of Lead's shells is [2, 8, 18, 32, 18, 4] and its electron configuration is [Xe] 4f14 5d10 6s2 6p2. The lead atom has a radius of 175 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 202 pm. In its elemental form, lead has a metallic gray appearance. Lead occurs naturally as a mixture of four stable isotopes: 204Pb (1.48%), 206Pb (23.6%), 207Pb (22.6%), and 208Pb (52.3%). Elemental LeadLead is obtained mainly from galena (PbS) by a roasting process. Anglesite, cerussite, and minim are other common lead containing minerals. Lead does occur as a free element in nature, but it is rare. It is a dense, soft metal that is very resistant to corrosion and poorly conductive compared to other metals. Its density and low melting point make it useful in applications such as electrolysis and industrial materials.

Magnesium Bohr ModelSee more Magnesium products. Magnesium (atomic symbol: Mg, atomic number: 12) is a Block S, Group 2, Period 3 element with an atomic mass of 24.3050. The number of electrons in each of Magnesium's shells is [2, 8, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ne] 3s2. The magnesium atom has a radius of 160 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 173 pm. Magnesium was discovered by Joseph Black in 1775 and first isolated by Sir Humphrey Davy in 1808. Magnesium is the eighth most abundant element in the earth's crust and the fourth most common element in the earth as a whole. Elemental MagnesiumIn its elemental form, magnesium has a shiny grey metallic appearance and is an extremely reactive. It is can be found in minerals such as brucite, carnallite, dolomite, magnesite, olivine and talc. Commercially, magnesium is primarily used in the creation of strong and lightweight aluminum-magnesium alloys, which have numerous advantages in industrial applications. The name "Magnesium" originates from a Greek district in Thessaly called Magnesia.

See more Niobium products. Niobium (atomic symbol: Nb, atomic number: 41) is a Block D, Group 5, Period 5 element with an atomic weight of 92.90638. Niobium Bohr ModelThe number of electrons in each of niobium's shells is 2, 8, 18, 12, 1 and its electron configuration is [Kr] 4d4 5s1. The niobium atom has a radius of 146 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 207 pm. Niobium was discovered by Charles Hatchett in 1801 and first isolated by Christian Wilhelm Blomstrand in 1864. In its elemental form, niobium has a gray metallic appearance. Niobium has the largest magnetic penetration depth of any element and is one of three elemental type-II superconductors (Elemental Niobiumalong with vanadium and technetium). Niobium is found in the minerals pyrochlore, its main commercial source, and columbite. The word Niobium originates from Niobe, daughter of mythical Greek king Tantalus.

See more Titanium products. Titanium (atomic symbol: Ti, atomic number: 22) is a Block D, Group 4, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 47.867. The number of electrons in each of Titanium's shells is [2, 8, 10, 2] and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d2 4s2. Titanium Bohr ModelThe titanium atom has a radius of 147 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 187 pm. Titanium was discovered by William Gregor in 1791 and first isolated by Jöns Jakob Berzelius in 1825. In its elemental form, titanium has a silvery grey-white metallic appearance. Titanium's properties are chemically and physically similar to zirconium, both of which have the same number of valence electrons and are in the same group in the periodic table. Elemental TitaniumTitanium has five naturally occurring isotopes: 46Ti through 50Ti, with 48Ti being the most abundant (73.8%). Titanium is found in igneous rocks and the sediments derived from them. It is named after the word Titanos, which is Greek for Titans.

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