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Tin Bismuth Zinc Powder

Linear Formula:

Sn-Bi-Zn

ORDER

PRODUCT Product Code ORDER SAFETY DATA TECHNICAL DATA
Tin Bismuth Zinc Alloy Powder
SN-BIZN-01-P
Pricing > SDS > Data Sheet >

Tin Bismuth Zinc Powder Properties (Theoretical)

Appearance Metallic Powder
Melting Point N/A
Boiling Point N/A
Density N/A

Tin Bismuth Zinc Powder Health & Safety Information

Signal Word N/A
Hazard Statements N/A
Hazard Codes N/A
Transport Information N/A
MSDS / SDS

About Tin Bismuth Zinc Powder

American Elements manufactures high performance water and gas atomized Tin Bismuth Zinc Powder optimized for additive manufacturing (3D printing, rapid prototyping). Our spherical free-flowing metal powders are engineered to be agglomerate-free with extremely low oxygen and carbon content, consistent micro-structure and tightly controlled morphology and particle size distributions which enable the production of large complex structures without sacrificing the material’s integrity. In addition to our extensive catalog of stock metals and alloys, we also manufacture custom alloy powders with novel compositions in support of developing innovations in the field of additive manufacturing.

Our rigorous quality assurance/quality control testing combined with our proficiency in formulation and process development translates into increased speed to market for our customers. As a trusted world leader in advanced atomized metal powders and custom material solutions, American Elements has the technical expertise to provide guidance in the selection of the most appropriate materials and production technologies for the unique requirements of our customers in the aerospace, medical devices, electronics, lighting and a growing list of other industries.

Tin Bismuth Zinc Powder Synonyms

SnBiZn

Chemical Identifiers

Linear Formula Sn-Bi-Zn
MDL Number N/A
EC No. N/A

Packaging Specifications

Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Safety Data Sheet (SDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes, and 36,000 lb. tanker trucks.

Related Elements

See more Bismuth products. Bismuth (atomic symbol: Bi, atomic number: 83) is a Block P, Group 15, Period 6 element with an atomic radius of 208.98040. The number of electrons in each of Bismuth's shells is 2, 8, 18, 32, 18, 5 and its electron configuration is [Xe] 4f14 5d10 6s2 6p3. Bismuth Bohr ModelThe bismuth atom has a radius of 156 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 207 pm. In its elemental form, bismuth is a silvery white brittle metal. Bismuth is the most diamagnetic of all metals and, with the exception of mercury, its thermal conductivity is lower than any other metal. Elemental BismuthBismuth has a high electrical resistance, and has the highest Hall Effect of any metal (i.e., greatest increase in electrical resistance when placed in a magnetic field). Bismuth is found in bismuthinite and bismite It is also produced as a byproduct of lead, copper, tin, molybdenum and tungsten extraction. Bismuth was first discovered by Early Man. The name Bismuth originates from the German word 'wissmuth,' meaning white mass.

Tin Bohr ModelSee more Tin products. Tin (atomic symbol: Sn, atomic number: 50) is a Block P, Group 14, Period 5 element with an atomic weight of 118.710. The number of electrons in each of tin's shells is 2, 8, 18, 18, 4 and its electron configuration is [Kr] 4d10 5s2 5p2. The tin atom has a radius of 140.5 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 217 pm.In its elemental form, tin has a silvery-gray metallic appearance. It is malleable, ductile and highly crystalline. High Purity (99.9999%) Tin (Sn) MetalTin has nine stable isotopes and 18 unstable isotopes. Under 3.72 degrees Kelvin, Tin becomes a superconductor. Applications for tin include soldering, plating, and such alloys as pewter. The first uses of tin can be dated to the Bronze Age around 3000 BC in which tin and copper were combined to make the alloy bronze. The origin of the word tin comes from the Latin word Stannum which translates to the Anglo-Saxon word tin. For more information on tin, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of tin products, visit the Tin element page.

See more Zinc products. Zinc (atomic symbol: Zn, atomic number: 30) is a Block D, Group 12, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 65.38. The number of electrons in each of zinc's shells is 2, 8, 18, 2, and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d10 4s2. Zinc Bohr ModelThe zinc atom has a radius of 134 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 210 pm. Zinc was discovered by Indian metallurgists prior to 1000 BC and first recognized as a unique element by Rasaratna Samuccaya in 800. Zinc was first isolated by Andreas Marggraf in 1746. In its elemental form, zinc has a silver-gray appearance. It is brittle at ordinary temperatures but malleable at 100 °C to 150 °C.Elemental Zinc It is a fair conductor of electricity, and burns in air at high red producing white clouds of the oxide. Zinc is mined from sulfidic ore deposits. It is the 24th most abundant element in the earth's crust and the fourth most common metal in use (after iron, aluminum, and copper). The name zinc originates from the German word "zin," meaning tin.

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December 14, 2018
Los Angeles, CA
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