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Gallium(III) Telluride Sputtering Target

Ga2Te3
CAS 12024-27-0


Product Product Code Request Quote
(2N) 99% Gallium(III) Telluride Sputtering Target GA3-TE-02-ST Request Quote
(3N) 99.9% Gallium(III) Telluride Sputtering Target GA3-TE-03-ST Request Quote
(4N) 99.99% Gallium(III) Telluride Sputtering Target GA3-TE-04-ST Request Quote
(5N) 99.999% Gallium(III) Telluride Sputtering Target GA3-TE-05-ST Request Quote
(6N) 99.9999% Gallium(III) Telluride Sputtering Target GA3-TE-06-ST Request Quote
(7N) 99.99999% Gallium(III) Telluride Sputtering Target GA3-TE-07-ST Request Quote

CHEMICAL
IDENTIFIER
Formula CAS No. PubChem CID MDL No. EC No IUPAC Name Beilstein
Re. No.
SMILES
Identifier
InChI
Identifier
InChI
Key
Ga2Te3 12024-27-0 N/A N/A 234-690-1 N/A N/A [Ga+2].[TeH2-2] InChI=1S/Ga.Te.H/q+2;-2; GSXIPKZTZZWWRS-UHFFFAOYSA-N

PROPERTIES Compound Formula Mol. Wt. Appearance Melting Point Boiling Point Density Exact Mass Monoisotopic Mass Charge MSDS
Ga2Te3 522.3 cubic crystals 790° C (1,454° F) N/A 5.57 g/cm3 N/A N/A N/A Safety Data Sheet

Telluride IonAmerican Elements specializes in producing high purity Gallium(III) Telluride Sputtering Targets with the highest possible density High Purity (99.99%) Gallium(III) Telluride Sputtering Targetand smallest possible average grain sizes for use in semiconductor, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) display and optical applications. Our standard Sputtering Targets for thin film are available monoblock or bonded with dimensions and configurations up to 820 mm with hole drill locations and threading, beveling, grooves and backing designed to work with both older sputtering devices as well as the latest process equipment, such as large area coating for solar energy or fuel cells and flip-chip applications. Research sized targets are also produced as well as custom sizes and alloys. All targets are analyzed using best demonstrated techniques including X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry (GDMS), and Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP). "Sputtering" allows for thin film deposition of an ultra high purity sputtering metallic or oxide material onto another solid substrate by the controlled removal and conversion of the target material into a directed gaseous/plasma phase through ionic bombardment. We can also provide targets outside this range in addition to just about any size rectangular, annular, or oval target. Materials are produced using crystallization, solid state and other ultra high purification processes such as sublimation. American Elements specializes in producing custom compositions for commercial and research applications and for new proprietary technologies. American Elements also casts any of the rare earth metals and most other advanced materials into rod, bar, or plate form, as well as other machined shapes and through other processes nanoparticles.Other shapes are available by request.

Gallium (Ga) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolGallium (atomic symbol: Ga, atomic number: 31) is a Block P, Group 13, Period 4 element with an atomic weight of 69.723.The number of electrons in each of Gallium's shells is 2, 8, 18, 3 and its electron configuration is [Ar] 3d10 4s2 4p1. The gallium atom has a radius of 122.1 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 187 pm. Gallium Bohr ModelGallium was predicted by Dmitri Mendeleev in 1871. It was first discovered and isolated by Lecoq de Boisbaudran in 1875. In its elemental form, gallium has a silvery appearance. Elemental GalliumGallium is one of three elements that occur naturally as a liquid at room temperature, the other two being mercury and cesium. Gallium does not exist as a free element in nature and is sourced commercially from bauxite and sphalerite. Currently, gallium is used in semiconductor devices for microelectronics and optics. The element name originates from the Latin word 'Gallia', the old name of France, and the word 'Gallus,' meaning rooster. For more information on gallium, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of gallium products, visit our Gallium element page.

Tellurium Bohr ModelTellurium (Te) atomic and molecular weight, atomic number and elemental symbolTellurium (atomic symbol: Te, atomic number: 52) is a Block P, Group 16, Period 5 element with an atomic radius of 127.60. The number of electrons in each of tellurium's shells is 2, 8, 18, 18, 6 and its electron configuration is [Kr] 4d10 5s2 5p4. Tellurium was discovered by Franz Muller von Reichenstein in 1782 and first isolated by Martin Heinrich Klaproth in 1798. In its elemental form, tellurium has a silvery lustrous gray appearance.Elemental Tellurium The tellurium atom has a radius of 140 pm and a Van der Waals radius of 206 pm. Tellurium is most commonly sourced from the anode sludges produced as a byproduct of copper refining. The name Tellurium originates from the Greek word Tellus, meaning Earth. For more information on tellurium, including properties, safety data, research, and American Elements' catalog of tellurium products, visit the Tellurium element page.

HEALTH, SAFETY & TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION
Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS
Signal Word N/A
Hazard Statements N/A
Hazard Codes N/A
Risk Codes N/A
Safety Precautions N/A
RTECS Number N/A
Transport Information N/A
WGK Germany N/A
Globally Harmonized System of
Classification and Labelling (GHS)
N/A        

CUSTOMERS FOR GALLIUM (III) TELLURIDE SPUTTERING TARGET HAVE ALSO LOOKED AT
Gallium Acetylacetonate Gallium Acetate Gallium Fluoride Gallium Antimonide Triethylgallium
Copper Indium Gallium Selenide - CIGS Gallium Arsenide Gallium Oxide Nanopowder Gallium Oxide Powder Gallium Nitride Wafer
Gadolinium Gallium Garnet - GGG Copper Gallium Sputtering Target Trimethylgallium Gallium doped Zinc Oxide - GZO Gallium Oxide
Show Me MORE Forms of Gallium

PACKAGING SPECIFICATIONS FOR BULK & RESEARCH QUANTITIES
Typical bulk packaging includes palletized plastic 5 gallon/25 kg. pails, fiber and steel drums to 1 ton super sacks in full container (FCL) or truck load (T/L) quantities. Research and sample quantities and hygroscopic, oxidizing or other air sensitive materials may be packaged under argon or vacuum. Shipping documentation includes a Certificate of Analysis and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Solutions are packaged in polypropylene, plastic or glass jars up to palletized 440 gallon liquid totes.


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Recent Research & Development for Gallium

  • Nanoscale Optical Properties of Indium Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride Nanodisk-in-Rod Heterostructures. Xiang Zhou, Ming-Yen Lu, Yu-Jung Lu, Eric J. Jones, Shangjr Gwo, and Silvija Gradeak. ACS Nano: February 7, 2015
  • Gallium Plasmonics: Deep Subwavelength Spectroscopic Imaging of Single and Interacting Gallium Nanoparticles. Mark W. Knight, Toon Coenen, Yang Yang, Benjamin J. M. Brenny, Maria Losurdo, April S. Brown, Henry O. Everitt, and Albert Polman. ACS Nano: January 28, 2015
  • Influence of Source and Drain Contacts on the Properties of Indium–Gallium–Zinc-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors based on Amorphous Carbon Nanofilm as Barrier Layer. Dongxiang Luo, Hua Xu, Mingjie Zhao, Min Li, Miao Xu, Jianhua Zou, Hong Tao, Lei Wang, and Junbiao Peng. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: January 26, 2015
  • Insertion of Benzonitrile into Al–N and Ga–N Bonds: Formation of Fused Carbatriaza-Gallanes/Alanes and Their Subsequent Synthesis from Amidines and Trimethyl-Gallium/Aluminum. K. Maheswari, A. Ramakrishna Rao, and N. Dastagiri Reddy. Inorg. Chem.: January 26, 2015
  • Mixed Pentele-Chalcogen Cationic Chains from Aluminum and Gallium Halide Melts. Andreas Eich, Thomas Bredow, and Johannes Beck. Inorg. Chem.: December 30, 2014
  • Temperature Dependent EXAFS Study of Chromium-Doped GaFeO3 at Gallium and Iron Edges. S. Basu, Ripandeep Singh, A. Das, T. Roy, A. Chakrabarti, A. K. Nigam, S. N. Jha, and D. Bhattacharyya. J. Phys. Chem. C: December 24, 2014
  • Solvothermal Synthesis of Gallium–Indium-Zinc-Oxide Nanoparticles for Electrolyte-Gated Transistors. Lídia Santos, Daniela Nunes, Tomás Calmeiro, Rita Branquinho, Daniela Salgueiro, Pedro Barquinha, Luís Pereira, Rodrigo Martins, and Elvira Fortunato. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: December 17, 2014
  • Surface Characterization of Gallium Nitride Modified with Peptides before and after Exposure to Ionizing Radiation in Solution. Nora G. Berg, Michael W. Nolan, Tania Paskova, and Albena Ivanisevic. Langmuir: December 5, 2014
  • Influence of Water on the Interfacial Behavior of Gallium Liquid Metal Alloys. Mohammad R. Khan, Chris Trlica, Ju-Hee So, Michael Valeri, and Michael D. Dickey. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: December 3, 2014
  • Low-Temperature Growth of Crystalline Gallium Nitride Films Using Vibrational Excitation of Ammonia Molecules in Laser-Assisted Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition. Hossein Rabiee Golgir, Yang Gao, Yun Shen Zhou, Lisha Fan, Premkumar Thirugnanam, Kamran Keramatnejad, Lan Jiang, Jean-François Silvain, and Yong Feng Lu. Crystal Growth & Design: November 11, 2014
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Recent Research & Development for Tellurides

  • Design of Lead Telluride Based Thermoelectric Materials through Incorporation of Lead Sulfide Inclusions or Ligand Stripping of Nano-Sized Building Blocks. Derak James, Xu Lu, Alexander Chi Nguyen, Donald T. Morelli, and Stephanie L. Brock. J. Phys. Chem. C: February 11, 2015
  • Efficient and Ultrafast Formation of Long-Lived Charge-Transfer Exciton State in Atomically Thin Cadmium Selenide/Cadmium Telluride Type-II Heteronanosheets. Kaifeng Wu, Qiuyang Li, Yanyan Jia, James R. McBride, Zhao-xiong Xie, and Tianquan Lian. ACS Nano: December 30, 2014
  • Quantitative Analysis of Free Fatty Acids in Human Serum Using Biexciton Auger Recombination in Cadmium Telluride Nanoparticles Loaded on Zeolite. Mengrui Yang and Tatsuya Fujino. Anal. Chem.: September 15, 2014
  • Mercury Telluride Colloidal Quantum Dots: Electronic Structure, Size-Dependent Spectra, and Photocurrent Detection up to 12 ?m. Sean E. Keuleyan, Philippe Guyot-Sionnest, Christophe Delerue, and Guy Allan. ACS Nano: August 12, 2014
  • Electron-Deficient Telluride Cs3Cu20Te13 with Sodalite-Type Network: Syntheses, Structures, and Physical Properties. Wen-Juan Huai, Jin-Ni Shen, Hua Lin, Ling Chen, and Li-Ming Wu. Inorg. Chem.: May 13, 2014
  • Thermoelectric Properties of Silver TellurideBismuth Telluride Nanowire Heterostructure Synthesized by Site-Selective Conversion. Haiyu Fang, Haoran Yang, and Yue Wu. Chem. Mater.: May 8, 2014
  • n-Type Carbon Nanotubes/Silver Telluride Nanohybrid Buckypaper with a High-Thermoelectric Figure of Merit. Weiyun Zhao, Hui Teng Tan, Li Ping Tan, Shufen Fan, Huey Hoon Hng, Yin Chiang Freddy Boey, Igor Beloborodov, and Qingyu Yan. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: March 19, 2014
  • Intense Pulsed Light Treatment of Cadmium Telluride Nanoparticle-Based Thin Films. Ruvini Dharmadasa, Brandon Lavery, I. M. Dharmadasa, and Thad Druffel. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces: March 17, 2014
  • Generalized One-Pot Synthesis of Copper Sulfide, Selenide-Sulfide, and Telluride-Sulfide Nanoparticles. Pearl L. Saldanha, Rosaria Brescia, Mirko Prato, Hongbo Li, Mauro Povia, Liberato Manna, and Vladimir Lesnyak. Chem. Mater.: January 9, 2014
  • Synthesis of Uniform Disk-Shaped Copper Telluride Nanocrystals and Cation Exchange to Cadmium Telluride Quantum Disks with Stable Red Emission. Hongbo Li, Rosaria Brescia, Mauro Povia, Mirko Prato, Giovanni Bertoni, Liberato Manna, and Iwan Moreels. J. Am. Chem. Soc.: July 18, 2013